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Comment: Re:Philosophy is fundamental (Score 1) 515

by darkvizier (#31584366) Attached to: Of the options below, I'd most like to learn more ...

(that in reply to ... ("energy" for example, but there are hundreds) have been invented by a single guy named Aristotle who lived 2500 years ago and always invented a new word when he had an idea which was unamed (sorry for nesting brackets)))

Ah, a vi user I see. Fixed that for you. You might be interested to know about paredit-mode, if you ever decide to convert.

Comment: We live in a physical world (Score 1) 511

by darkvizier (#31573058) Attached to: What Is Holding Back the Paperless Office?
Our brains like to map things in a model similar to that which we already know. I can write on a piece of paper, I can doodle. I can draw arbitrary lines and shapes wherever I choose, and I can put it in a physical space on my desk which isn't limited to my screen real estate. It is real to me, in a way that a window on my desktop is not. It follows laws of physics. The matter will not be destroyed if my machine reboots and I forget to click save.

Because our computer applications do not follow the same laws as our physical world, we can't think about them in the same way. In many cases we don't need to. There are advantages of course to not being restrained to the laws of the physical world. We can make copies of our data, we can apply different templates and formatting to it without rewriting the content.

Can we create technologies which carry both the benefits of the digital world and the solidity and predictability, and reliability of the physical world? I think this is possible, but it requires a much greater discipline than we normally apply to our product design. It requires that intuitive workflows be established and well supported, and that the interface itself have parallels to our experience of the physical world. It requires a lot of thinking about what we do and how and why. We just don't hold ourselves to very high standards in this regard. We are lazy. And we are unimaginative about the ideal role of technology.

Comment: My experience working in healthcare insurance... (Score 1) 2044

by darkvizier (#31538808) Attached to: Health Care Reform
From my experience, healthcare insurance companies are disgustingly inefficient from an IT standpoint. I've worked at two, including one major national provider and one that is the main provider for state employees where I live. Both of them were using outdated technologies and hiring entire departments of people to manually push claims through the system, since their software was consistently unreliable. Quality software in this industry would cut out a huge amount of overhead. It would also force a lot of lazy people to find new jobs, so there is a big political force in these companies opposing this sort of change. I think the best hope for this market is competition. The industry needs some startup companies who are doing things smarter, faster and better, and are taking huge swaths of customers away from them. That's the only thing that will actually motivate them to change. I'm looking for a bill that actually finds a way to encourage and help new companies get started in the industry.

Comment: Re:do you treat the iliad and odyssey (Score 1) 248

by darkvizier (#31373582) Attached to: China's Human Flesh Search Engine

because there really are people posting here, and that you meet in real life, who think of orwell as some sort of religious prophet about the coming armageddeon. that every sign and signal and portent of news from real life is merely evidence of the coming state of big brother and 1984 as reality. the same as any other idiotic apocalyptic cult

We are not idiots. Steve Jobs will lead us to freedom.

Comment: Re:Who cares? (Score 1) 182

by darkvizier (#31100064) Attached to: <em>StarCraft II</em> Beta To Begin This Month

This is Slashdot. We should be griping about the DRM, or the removal of LAN play which is obviously intended to keep us as indentured servants to the corporate behemoth, not talking about trivial things like when the game is going to be released.

Fuck yeah! That's the spirit. Bring back the /. I know!

Comment: Re:This beta should be...fun? (Score 4, Insightful) 182

by darkvizier (#31100050) Attached to: <em>StarCraft II</em> Beta To Begin This Month

PC games are losing ground to consoles because the fucking game manufacturers keep trying to turn the PC into a console.

Turning PCs into consoles? That won't happen easily in the RTS genre because the controls are so different.

But in other genres, let me know when multiplayer PC games designed for use with a single PC and HDTV become common, and I'll agree with you. But right now, they appear to be limited to Serious Sam, Left 4 Dead, and EA Sports.

I think the GP was talking about DRM/anti-pirating measures, not the user controls. Essentially they're trying to turn computer games into the black box that console games are.

Comment: Re:Map Publishing (Score 1) 188

by darkvizier (#31086984) Attached to: Blizzard Previews Revamped Battle.net
Good points. I find the map features interesting as well. I like the idea of having some sort of organization there, as with Starcraft you just had people appending a bunch of random ascii characters to a name and throwing it out there. Dunno about others but I often found it confusing to determine exactly what I was looking at. Giving the option of paid maps/mods is a good idea too... players can decide for themselves whether something is of value, and conversely map/mod makers will have to tell a convincing story in order to get people to pay.

Also really looking forward to a more robust set of editing tools. One of the funnest things for me was building storyline maps. Triggers were a wonderful asset for that, but some customization was still missing. Can't wait to get my hands on the new map editor.

The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that, you've got it made. -- Jean Giraudoux

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