Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:They are not claiming everything is their own. (Score 1) 394

by dark12222000 (#41996553) Attached to: Red Hat Developer Demands Competitor's Source Code
RTS simply said they had used some APIs. What that means isn't entirely clear - it could mean modules, or just a specification. There has been some question as to whether or not they are shipping a modified Linux without releasing source, but that's been a more recent development.

Comment: Re:Guilty by confusion. (Score 1) 394

by dark12222000 (#41988029) Attached to: Red Hat Developer Demands Competitor's Source Code
You're wrong. The issue here is whether or not Rising Tide backported other's contributions from their GPL version which would be a violation of the GPL. Nvidia's codebase is 100% theirs and is 100% proprietary, and therefore, they can do whatever they want with it. Rising Tide open sourced a version of their code. They claim the version they are now selling is only their work... despite that it seems to contain improvements found in the GPL version from other contributors.

Comment: Depends on what you want (Score 1) 259

by dark12222000 (#41949665) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Is the Best Way To Add Forums To a Website?
Most of it depends on what you're after.

PhpBB has a ton of features, but is a bit slow and bulky. I feel it's easy to work with, but it's probably not the easiest out there.

VanillaForums are extremely simply but lack some features (though many of these can be "bought").

vBulletin has a lot of niceties, but can be a bit of a hog and doesn't come cheap.

There is also SMF (Simple Machine Forums) which I've been told is a cross between phpBB and Vanilla Forums, but I haven't personally used it.

If you're new to this sort of thing, go for Vanilla. It's free, extremely easy, and has a lot of nifty features out of the box.

Comment: Re:Make it illegal (Score 4, Interesting) 1199

by dark12222000 (#41569281) Attached to: Hiring Smokers Banned In South Florida City
You're confusing advertising with rights.

I have a right (a liberty in Hoefield's scheme of rights) to curse within my own home. I also have a right to live off of brownies if I so decide. I don't have that right because brownies or cursing is so "valuable" per se, but because it's my right, legally, to do what I wish within my home so long as it doesn't affect others. To carry my example, I can't curse so loudly as to disrupt my neighbors, even though I can otherwise curse - again, the issue isn't the cursing here, it's that I am disrupting my neighbors.

We can argue that smoking seems to cause a lot of health issues for non-smokers who are nearby. The majority of the research we have at this point seems to indicate a causative pattern pretty strongly. Therefore, at least in some states, you can't smoke in a restaurant or by a door way. On the other hand, there is absolutely no reason (nor does the Federal Government have the ability to) limit smoking within the privacy of your own home. I would argue that most businesses don't either unless they can prove that your smoking/non-smoking is required for your job (say, if you work at a hospital).

TLDR: "If [eating brownies] is so great and such a valuable right that others shouldn't be able to stop you doing it whenever and wherever you please, why do [brownie producing companies] spend hundred of millions of dollars every year just to keep convincing people they need to keep doing it?

+ - Notch releases early view of 0x10c->

Submitted by
dark12222000
dark12222000 writes "Notch, the creator of the acclaimed game Minecraft has just released a video which gives us an early glimpse into his latest game, 0x10c. The video includes basic physics, lighting, and an early weapon.

0x10c is a space based MMORPG which allows players to explore space while programming and building their own spaceship."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Technet + Dreamspark (Score 4, Informative) 187

by dark12222000 (#41413639) Attached to: How Microsoft Is Wooing College Kids To Write Apps For Windows 8
What University do you go to? CS at my Uni is 80% Macs, 10% Linux machines (disproportionately Ubuntu, for better or for worse), 5% Windows machines, and the rest never bring laptops (and borrow a mac from the Uni to do work on).

Again, all of our software is either on a central server that can be SSH'd to with X access (and thus any machine can be used to get to it), it's cross platform, or it's OS/X or Linux. I can only think of maybe one specific class that you *must* have a windows machine for (and it's like a C# class or something) and even then, I think they meet in a computer lab of Windows machines.

Any mac can be setup for development trivially quickly and easily. I'm not at all a mac fanboy (quite the opposite) but Apple did figure out how to treat their developers well. It wouldn't surprise me if a great amount of Universities are pretty Windows leaning, but it's not the de facto standard by any shot. OS X has a good hold on the Universities (and most programmers) and I strongly suspect it will continue grow. (Personally, they can have my Arch laptop when they can pry it out of my cold dead hands).

Comment: Re:Technet + Dreamspark (Score 1) 187

by dark12222000 (#41413399) Attached to: How Microsoft Is Wooing College Kids To Write Apps For Windows 8
Welcome to programming? Lets you see develop windows applications without buying a 400$+ windows PC, or even Linux applications without a machine that runs Linux. If you buy a mac, all the programming tools are free, all the documentation is free, and you don't even need to show student ID.

Comment: Re:It Has Kept Us Safe (Score 2) 326

by dark12222000 (#41318621) Attached to: House Approves Extending the Warrantless Wiretapping Act
Yup. This has absolutely kept us perfectly safe. All of our consulates are safe, we've never had any terrorist attacks, and there have never been any breaches of government security. This is clearly working so well.

By the way, you're a selfish bastard if all you care about is "My freedom".

Thus spake the master programmer: "Time for you to leave." -- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"

Working...