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Networking

200-400 Gbps DDoS Attacks Are Now Normal 92

Posted by Soulskill
from the distributed-denial-of-sherbet dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Brian Krebs has a followup to this week's 400 Gbps DDoS attack using NTP amplification. Krebs, as a computer security writer, has often been the target of DDoS attacks. He was also hit by a 200Gbps attack this week (apparently, from a 15-year-old in Illinois). That kind of volume would have been record-breaking only a couple of years ago, but now it's just normal. Arbor Networks says we've entered the 'hockey stick' era of DDoS attacks, as a graph of attack volume spikes sharply over the past year. CloudFlare's CEO wrote, 'Monday's DDoS proved these attacks aren't just theoretical. To generate approximately 400Gbps of traffic, the attacker used 4,529 NTP servers running on 1,298 different networks. On average, each of these servers sent 87Mbps of traffic to the intended victim on CloudFlare's network. Remarkably, it is possible that the attacker used only a single server running on a network that allowed source IP address spoofing to initiate the requests. An attacker with a 1 Gbps connection can theoretically generate more than 200Gbps of DDoS traffic.' In a statement to Krebs, he added, 'We have an attack of over 100 Gbps almost every hour of every day.'"

Comment: Simply Put: Hell No (Score 4, Informative) 402

by daphx86 (#39852269) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Building A Server Rack Into a New Home?

At work we have 1U servers mounted on a two post rack. Every time I have to do any kind of work on the rack I basically have to do yoga to get at the back of the rack.

As nice as it is to get a full body workout every time something needs to be added to or removed from the rack, I would strongly suggest you avoid racks that can't be accessed from the back like the plague.

On the upside I have discovered unique ways to string together curse words while fumbling behind the rack.

Science

Dinosaur Feathers Found In Amber 190

Posted by samzenpus
from the I-think-I-saw-this-movie dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A stunning array of prehistoric feathers, including dinosaur protofeathers, has been discovered in Late Cretaceous amber from Canada. 'Protofeathers aren't known from any modern, existing groups of birds and therefore the most obvious interpretation is that they belong to dinosaurs,' said University of Alberta professor, Alexander P. Wolfe. The 78 to 79-million-year-old amber preserved the feathers in vivid detail, including some of their diverse colors."
Biotech

Sequencing the Weed Genome 315

Posted by Soulskill
from the department-of..-wait-no..-i'm-hungry dept.
GNUman writes "Maybe soon we'll be able to genetically modify humans so that a specific action (e.g., tapping your nose, pinching your ear) triggers the release of THC directly from your own cells. From the Nature blog post: 'At last, the field of genomics has something to offer Cheech and Chong. DNA sequencing hit a new high last night with the midnight release of the Cannabis sativa genome. The raw sequence was posted on Amazon's EC2 public cloud computing service by a young company called Medicinal Genomics, which aims to explore the genomes of therapeutic plants.'"
PlayStation (Games)

Sony To Offer Free Identity Theft Monitoring 157

Posted by timothy
from the should-be-an-easy-script-to-write dept.
olsmeister writes "Several weeks after having the PlayStation Network hacked, and apologizing to users for the breach, Sony is offering $1 million in identity theft protection for users who sign up before June 18th. The protection is being offered through Debix and is called AllClear ID Plus. This appears to be some kind of custom plan especially for Sony, as their normal offerings are called AllClear ID Free and AllClear ID Pro."
Wireless Networking

Ask Slashdot: Best Way To Leave My Router Open? 520

Posted by timothy
from the tomayto-tomahto-ddwrt dept.
generalhavok writes "I read the story on Slashdot earlier about the EFF encouraging people to leave their WiFi open to share the internet. I would like to do this! I don't mind sharing my connection and letting my neighbors check their email or browse the web. However, when I used to leave it open, I quickly found my limited bandwidth dissappearing, as my neighbors started using it heavily by streaming videos, downloading large files, and torrenting. What is an easy way I can share my internet, while enforcing some limits so there is enough bandwidth left for me? What about separating the neighbors from my internal home network? Can this be done with consumer-grade routers? If the average consumer wants to share, what's the easiest and safest way to do it?"
The Courts

Obama DoJ Goes Against Film Companies 321

Posted by Soulskill
from the shaking-things-up dept.
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "If one attempted to distill a single prevailing emotion or attitude about government on Slashdot, I think it is fairly arguable that the winner would be cynicism or skepticism. Well here's a story that could make us skeptical and/or cynical about our skepticism and/or cynicism. Chalk one up for those who like to point out that, occasionally, the system does work. You may recall that the US Supreme Court has been mulling over whether to grant the film industry's petition for certiorari seeking to overturn the important Cartoon Networks v. CSC Holdings decision from the US Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit. This was the case which held that Cablevision's allowing its customers to make copies of shows and store them on Cablevision's servers for later viewing did not constitute a direct copyright infringement by Cablevision, there being no 'copy' made since the files were in RAM and buffered for only a 'transitory' duration. The Supreme Court asked the Obama DoJ to submit an amicus curiae brief, giving its opinion on whether or not the film companies' petition for review should be granted. The government did indeed file such a brief, but the content of the brief (PDF) is probably not what the film companies were expecting. They probably thought they had this one in the bag, since some of the very lawyers who have been representing them have been appointed to the highest echelons of the Obama DoJ. Instead, however, the brief eloquently argued against the film companies' position, dismembering with surgical accuracy each and every argument the film companies had advanced."
The Military

Project OXCART Declassified From Area 51 208

Posted by Soulskill
from the tommy-lee-jones-comes-forward dept.
An anonymous reader sends this excerpt from the LA Times: "... the myths of Area 51 are hard to dispute if no one can speak on the record about what actually happened there. Well, now, for the first time, someone is ready to talk ... Colonel Hugh 'Slip' Slater, 87, was commander of the Area 51 base in the 1960s. Edward Lovick, 90, featured in 'What Plane?' in LA's March issue, spent three decades radar testing some of the world's most famous aircraft (including the U-2, the A-12 OXCART and the F-117). Kenneth Collins, 80, a CIA experimental test pilot, was given the silver star. Thornton 'T.D.' Barnes, 72, was an Area 51 special-projects engineer. And Harry Martin, 77, was one of the men in charge of the base's half-million-gallon monthly supply of spy-plane fuels."
Patents

Some Schools Welcoming Patent Firm, Others Wary 55

Posted by Soulskill
from the and-by-firm-i-mean-troll dept.
theodp writes "Intellectual Ventures (IV) will be setting up shop at the top of a Four Seasons this week as Headline Sponsor of the Ready to Commercialize 2008 conference hosted by the University of Texas at Austin. It's the patent firm's 100th university deal, though some, such as Professor Michael Heller at Columbia University, warn against such deals. '... their individual profit comes at the cost of the public ability to innovate. The university's larger mission is to serve the public interest, and some of these deals work against that public interest.' It's a follow-up to the conference IV sponsored last summer for technology transfer professionals entrusted with commercializing their universities' intellectual property, and should help IV, a friend of Microsoft, snag even more exclusive deals (PDF)."
Image

The Walking House 304 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the baba-yaga-eat-your-heart-out dept.
What is 10' tall, has six hydraulic legs, and is powered by the wind and solar panels? The prototype pod house built by art collective N55 in Copenhagen, Denmark. With the help of MIT, N55 built the pod over a two-year period at a cost of £30,000. Designers say it provides a solution to the problem of rising water levels as the house can simply walk away from floods. One of the designers says, "This house is not just for travellers but also for anyone interested in a more general way of nomadic living." It won't be long now until the Japanese make Howl's Moving Castle.
Earth

Huge Arctic Ice Shelf Breaks Off 736

Posted by samzenpus
from the getting-warmer dept.
knarfling writes "CNN is reporting that a chunk of ice shelf nearly the size of Manhattan has broken away from Ellesmere Island in Canada's northern Arctic. Just last month 21 square miles of ice broke free from the Markham Ice Shelf. Scientists are saying that Ellesmere Island has now lost more than 10 times the ice that was predicted earlier this summer. How long before the fabled Northwest Passage is a reality?"
Announcements

+ - Perfect Sphere: Scientists redefine 1kg standard->

Submitted by zam_Zamorano
zam_Zamorano (666) writes "Scientists from Australia's CSIRO and National Measurement Institute have created a perfect silicon sphere that will replace the 120 year old international standard for the mass of one kilogram, held by the International Bureau of Weights and Measurement in Paris. For several years the world body for weights and measurements has followed several attempts to redefine the kilogram, one of which was the CSIRO and NMI's Avogadro Project. Avogadro sought to bring together enough atoms of a single substance to redefine the kilogram. They created a perfect sphere from a single isotope: silicon 28, with the help of a Russian uranium enrichment plant that was converted to enrich the relatively cheap and well understood silicon, which was a suitable substance as a single crystal of the right size can be grown and its atomic structure is extremely uniform. To achieve the perfect and faultless surface, a technique not unlike the practice Sir Isaac Newtown used to polish the first mirrors was used. Two sphere's were produced, each with out-of-roundness figures of about 63nm and 70nm, or 63 and 70 millionths of a millimeter respectively, at a cost of 2.5 million dollars. One of the key scientists working on Avogadro, Achim Leistner, had this to say: "The kilogram is the only primary standard of the seven other standards that is not based on a natural constant in nature — in other words it is purely by definition...every other of the SI units will almost automatically get an upgrade because we will know more precisely what the kilogram is...the opportunity to work on such a prestigious but important project that will affect not just the kilogram but every other science and every other measurement is something even I can't get my head around properly.""
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