Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:How does one detect these things (Score 3, Informative) 168

by dan_linder (#47481845) Attached to: New Mayhem Malware Targets Linux and UNIX-Like Servers
From reading TFA, they mention some possible names:

and drops a malicious shared object named 'libworker.so'

or

After that, the PHP dropper creates a shell script named '1.sh',

And for each of those, they present some example contents that could be used to verify it is part of this infection.

Comment: The next Clippy? (Score 2) 56

by dan_linder (#43542757) Attached to: IBM Robotic Coworker Will Help Engineers Fix Broken Systems

"I see you're trying to fix a linear accelerator, would you like some help?"

And who is responsible when the system tells the human to incorrectly repair something? If taken to the extreme companies will (attempt to) hire the least expensive human asset and expect the computer system to provide infallible information.

Debian

+ - AMD64 Now Debian's Most Popular Architecture->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Bill Allombert announced today via the Debian-devel mailing list that the X86_64 version of Debian has now surpassed all of the other supported architectures by a narrow margin. The most surprising part of this announcement however, and accompanying info-graphics provided on the Debian Popularity Contest page, is that this was not already true.

Thanks to PAE support is Debian kernels dating back to 2010, the i386 architecture had been given life support, finally allowing for systems to break through the 32-bit 4GB memory ceiling. PAE support allows for 64-bit Intel and AMD processors to dedicate the maximum addressable memory to individual applications, while still executing 32-bit code exclusively."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:It would be good to have optional GUI (Score 1) 780

by dan_linder (#38686928) Attached to: Windows Admins Need To Prepare For GUI-Less Server

So why not have a management client tool that is a native Windows app that you can run on your desktop?

For the complex applications that make good use of a GUI, these can be setup this way.

And a well written CLI tool run on the server (or possibly remotely) could do all of that too, just more complex command lines. (Or a curses-like menu system.)

+ - Version Control

Submitted by
David_Wayne
David_Wayne writes "I'm interested in using a version control system like Subversion to maintain the versions of the executables for an installation. I want to be able to track the changes to various files over time (not the content of the files, but their replacements with newer versions). This will allow me to ensure records of when changes occur as well as who makes them. It also ensures that the old version is easily available in the event of rollback need. My question to the Slashdot community is, is this a valid use of SVN?"
Transportation

+ - TSA Makes $440K Annually in Loose Change

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens writes
Hugh Pickens writes writes "NBC reports that airport travelers left behind $409,085.56 in loose change at security checkpoints in 2010 providing an additional source of funding for the Transportation Security Administration. “TSA puts (the leftover money) in a jar at security checkpoint, at the end of each shift they take it, count it, put it in an envelope and send it to the finance office," says TSA spokesperson Nico Melendez. "“It is amazing. All that change, it all adds up." Melendez adds that the money goes into the general operating budget for TSA that is typically used for technology, light bulbs or just overall general expenses. Rep. Jeff Miller (R-Fla.) has introduced legislation that would direct the TSA to transfer unclaimed money recovered at airport security checkpoints to the United Service Organizations (USO), a private nonprofit that operates centers for the military at 41 U.S. airports. “The congressman feels giving it to the USO to help with onsite airport service for active members of the military would be a good use for it," says Miller spokesperson Dan McFaul. The recovered change is not to be confused with the theft that occurs when TSA agents augment their salary by helping themselves to the contents of passengers’ luggage as it passes through security checkpoints. For example in 2009, a half dozen TSA agents at Miami International Airport were charged with grand theft after boosting an iPod, bottles of perfume, cameras, a GPS system, a Coach purse, and a Hewlett Packard Mini Notebook from passengers’ luggage as travelers at just this one airport reported as many as 1,500 items stolen, the majority of which were never recovered."

Comment: Re:Anyone else not surprised? (Score 1) 612

by dan_linder (#38309234) Attached to: Iranian TV Shows Downed US Drone

How about this failsafe:
Once Iran is confident that they can take control of all our drone aircraft, we put in a small yield bomb of some sort with a multi-hour delay. The delay timer is started once the lock between the drone and the US transmitter is broken. A few hours is probably enough to get the aircraft back to their base where they start dismantling it and *boom*.

And we can have the drones refuel at a remote automated location, so only maintenance is the only time a user would have to get close to the explosive. (Aircraft crews work with potentially armed bombs all the time, so it's not that big of a problem to surmount.)

Comment: *yawn* More impressed with Javascript PC Emulator. (Score 1) 209

by dan_linder (#37073716) Attached to: Chrome 14 Beta Integrates Native Client

How's the "Native Client" a big step when we've already seen the Javascript PC Emulator:

        http://bellard.org/jslinux/

I guess a Chrome browser pulling up that page, the Javascript PC Emulator booting X to run Chrome to run a Native Client PC emulator would be a neat hack...

Dan

Comment: Re:And the CAs do ... what again? (Score 1) 151

by dan_linder (#35597588) Attached to: Phony Web Certs Issued For Google, Yahoo, Skype

Eh, I kinda just realized that I'm coming off like a jerk. Sorry for my comments.

Wow, I'm impressed. The first sign of self-monitoring I've seen on Slashdot in a long time!

I sincerely wish more people would actually apologize like Sancho when they have an inkling they might have gone over the line.

You've restored my faith in the Slashdot community a bit.

Dan

Comment: Re:DEC scared IBM in the 80's (Score 2) 172

by dan_linder (#35136830) Attached to: Computer Industry Mourns DEC Founder Ken Olsen

You have forgotten the DEC Rainbow. But that's ok, everyone else has also forgoten the Rainbow.

Which is sad really. It was a dual-processor system - a Zilog Z80 and an Intel 8080 CPU. When it ran CP/M the Z80 did everything, but when it ran MS-DOS the 8080 was the primary CPU and the Z80 handled the IO.

The architecture was even better thought through and didn't break up the RAM like the IBM PC did (hence the 640K "limit"). I remember booting my Rainbow 100B and getting 720KB of usable RAM without trying very hard.

Sadly, the only real games that got ported to it were the Zork line of Infocom games, and a few DEC written graphical games. (Anyone remember "SCRAM"? Probably not the most marketable game since the objective was to descend to the lowest level of a failing nuclear reactor and "scram it" to keep it from going critical...)

Ken, you have no idea how much your "little company" got me started in computers. Thank you!

Dan

"No job too big; no fee too big!" -- Dr. Peter Venkman, "Ghost-busters"

Working...