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damn_registrars's Journal: Washington Hasn't Changed That Much Yet 7

Journal by damn_registrars
It was revealed recently that the credit card bill passed by congress included an amendment to allow concealed weapons in national parks. This leaves several questions:
  • What do the national parks have to do with credit cards?
  • What do guns have to do with credit cards?
  • What do guns have to do with national parks?
  • What exactly do people need to defend themselves from with loaded and concealed weapons in the national parks?

Obviously this is just another sign of how so many things have been done in Washington; if you want your less-than-popular measure passed, just attach it at the last minute to a popular and unrelated bill (yes, even The Simpsons did this). In other words, even though the gun lobby knew they did not have enough support for such an act, they managed to push it through anyways by tacking it onto something widely supported.

Though no, I am not going to ask for a line-item veto. This is bad legislation in the fact that completely unrelated causes were tied together. But a line-item veto would be too much power for an executive; rather we need to expect more from our congresspeople. Though of course we know this is not something that itself can be legislated away; we need to see genuine ethics reform in Washington.

This discussion was created by damn_registrars (1103043) for no Foes, but now has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Washington Hasn't Changed That Much Yet

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  • That's an understatement. It's ALL of the power. People forget that the line item veto means that ANY line can be vetoed. So make a massive bill that includes a tiny point hidden in the back that reads "free hookers for PMF". The bill gets to the President's desk, and he vetoes the entire bill but that one line.

    So the bill turns into the PMF Free Hooker bill just like that.

    • the PMF Free Hooker bill

      Are you trying to take a classic Washington establishment and paint it dirty?

      Although I think the line-item could be even worse than you just described. If the situation was that the bill I referred to was passed by both houses under the name "credit card fairness act" or whatever name was assigned to it, and it went to the desk of a president who was pro-gun but anti-regulation with the line item veto power, he could do as you suggested and line out everything but the gun bit. The end result would be

      • by Qzukk (229616)

        Bigger question is whether Congress would get a corresponding line-item-veto override, and if they do, whether they'd be forced to use it in these situations (or if they could just have one override vote to restore the whole bill). Because it would be totally awes^H^H^Hsshat-ish to take a really important "must pass" bill that Congress loaded down with 600 pages of bullshit, and individually veto everything but one line of some harmless bullshit, and then let Congress duke it out for the rest of the sessio

  • What exactly do people need to defend themselves from with loaded and concealed weapons in the national parks?

    Bears. Cougars. Mountain Lions. Rattlesnakes. Aggressive Bull Deer. Criminals. Badgers. Wolverines.

    Apparently you've never been to a National Park.
  • In other words, even though the gun lobby knew they did not have enough support for such an act, they managed to push it through anyways by tacking it onto something widely supported.

    I wouldn't be so sure that it wasn't the other way around. Instead of this measure being attached to the credit card bill to assure that Democrats would vote for gun rights, perhaps this was attached to the credit card bill to assure a more broadly bipartisan passage for the bill. Republicans have their NRA ratings to look after.

  • My question is how the fuck did this get attached to anything without a vote of some sort? I have heard about these sorts of things for years. Why isn't there a fucking paper trail? I would think that one could look through the proceedings and unwind the BS to figure out what 'representatives' allowed this in. But that would require a reporter to get off his dead ass.

    This, this is why newspapers are dying: you no longer report. You do not have someone willing to dig through the minutes of a Congressional he

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