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Comment: Going to be a lot of dead kids and pets (Score 1) 43

by WillAffleckUW (#48907591) Attached to: Germany Plans Highway Test Track For Self-Driving Cars

Test tracks rarely allow for what happens in the real world when snow, rain, and fog combine with small kids and pets playing.

How many billions in lawsuits for their lifetime (a kid lives 100 years, and becomes a CEO that means $40 billion each kid) will these Steel Death Automatons rack up before they are outlawed except in retirement communities without kids or pets?

Comment: Re: not honest (Score 1) 334

by PopeRatzo (#48906739) Attached to: Americans Support Mandatory Labeling of Food That Contains DNA

"Safe" doesn't even have to be the issue. The issue is, why are these people so keen to make sure consumers don't know where their food comes from? Even more important, why are they so keen to make sure that consumers don't know where their food money is going?

When I buy a bag of rice or an ear of corn, I want to know whether or not my money is going to pay for a license fee for intellectual property covering a basic foodstuff. Because I would rather it did not. And for some strange reason, there is a group of people out there who believe I should not have that choice as a consumer, and they use "science" as their reason.

+ - Is a Climate Disaster Inevitable?

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Astrophysicist Adam Frank has an interesting article in the NYT postulating one answer to the Fermi paradox — that the human evolution into a globe-spanning industrial culture is forcing us through the narrow bottleneck of a sustainability crisis and that civilization inevitably leads to catastrophic planetary changes. According to Frank, our current sustainability crisis may be neither politically contingent nor unique, but a natural consequence of laws governing how planets and life of any kind, anywhere, must interact. Some excerpts:

The defining feature of a technological civilization is the capacity to intensively “harvest” energy. But the basic physics of energy, heat and work known as thermodynamics tell us that waste, or what we physicists call entropy, must be generated and dumped back into the environment in the process. Human civilization currently harvests around 100 billion megawatt hours of energy each year and dumps 36 billion tons of carbon dioxide into the planetary system, which is why the atmosphere is holding more heat and the oceans are acidifying.

All forms of intensive energy-harvesting will have feedbacks, even if some are more powerful than others. A study by scientists at the Max Planck Institute in Jena, Germany, found that extracting energy from wind power on a huge scale can cause its own global climate consequences. When it comes to building world-girdling civilizations, there are no planetary free lunches.

By studying these nearby planets, we’ve discovered general rules for both climate and climate change (PDF). These rules, based in physics and chemistry, must apply to any species, anywhere, taking up energy-harvesting and civilization-building in a big way. For example, any species climbing up the technological ladder by harvesting energy through combustion must alter the chemical makeup of its atmosphere to some degree. Combustion always produces chemical byproducts, and those byproducts can’t just disappear

"

Comment: Re:Their excuse sucks (Score 1) 334

It's worse than that. They are saying that if you don't submit a patch with your bug report then you can fuck off, because they don't care. Even if you do submit a patch they'll only "consider" it, meaning when they feel like getting around to it. Which will be never, because *they don't care*.

Who the heck do Google think they are - Linus Torvalds?

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