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Comment: Shift already occurring in scientific research (Score 1) 197 197

In our latest studies on various diseases associated with aging, many are now following younger subjects. The major problem is that annual followups tend not to work as well, since younger people are busy, so you have to go from an annual cycle to an every 2-3 year cycle. However, this makes changes more noticeable. Following subjects when they're very young is more difficult, as they tend to move a lot more. So most studies now are shifting to a 35-40 lower age range.

Portables

Two-Pounder From Lenovo Might Be Too Light For Comfort 26 26

MojoKid writes: With the advent of solid state storage and faster, lower-powered processors that require less complex cooling solutions, the average mainstream notebook is rather svelte. Recently, however, Lenovo announced their LaVie Z and LaVie Z 360 ultrabooks and at 1.87 and 2.04 pounds respectively, they're almost ridiculously light. Further, with Core i7 mobile processors and fast SSDs on board, these machines perform impressively well in the benchmarks and real world usage. If you actually pick one up though, both models are so light they feel almost empty, like there's nothing inside. Lenovo achieved this in part by utilizing a magnesium--lithium composite material for the casing of the machines. Though they're incredibly light, the feeling is almost too light, such that they tend to feel a little cheap or flimsy. With a tablet, you come to expect a super thin and light experience and when holding them in one hand, the light weight is an advantage. However, banging on a full-up notebook keyboard deck is a different ball of wax.

+ - Airbus chating on competition in cross-channel e-flight challenge

An anonymous reader writes: Aerospace giant Airbus has been accused of 'bad sportsmanship' after squashing the ambitions of light aircraft maker Pipistrel to be the first to fly an electric aircraft across the English Channel.
After Pipistrel acquired flight permissions, the German electronics company Siemens which supplies the electric motor used in the Pipistrel Alpha Electro contacted Pipistrel to say they could not use the motor over water (partly German).

+ - Robots in the rough: Pictures and videos from demo day at FSR Toronto->

Hallie Siegel writes: This June the world’s top experts on field and service robotics met at the bi-annual Field and Service Robotics (FSR) conference, hosted this year by the University of Toronto. We went up to the UTIAS lab for Demo Day to get a first hand look at some of the robot research platforms being developed there, and at Waterloo, and MDA Robotics. Some nice pics and video demos of a tethered robot climbing walls, an autonomous RUV driving through tall grasses, a robust controller for quadrotors, a hexcopter with a multi-camera system that constructs maps, and even an autonomous test car.
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Security

'Severe Bug' To Be Patched In OpenSSL 23 23

An anonymous reader writes: The Register reports that upcoming OpenSSL versions 1.0.2d and 1.0.1p are claimed to fix a single security defect classified as "high" severity. It is not yet known what this mysterious vulnerability is — that would give the game away to attackers hoping to exploit the hole before the patch is released to the public. Some OpenSSL's examples of "high severity" vulnerabilities are a server denial-of-service, a significant leak of server memory, and remote code execution. If you are a system administrator, get ready to patch your systems this week. The defect does not affect the 1.0.0 or 0.9.8 versions of the library.

Comment: Re:Master key (Score 1) 44 44

Sort of like how Hacking Team had a separate watermark/backdoor into each tool they sold to governments.

I'm sure the government's solution will be to outlaw backdoors in stuff they buy while mandating backdoors for everyone else. Not being a flaming hypocrite has never been any politician's strong suit.

+ - 'Severe Bug' To Be Patched In OpenSSL

An anonymous reader writes: The Register reports that upcoming OpenSSL versions 1.0.2d and 1.0.1p are claimed to fix a single security defect classified as "high" severity. It is not yet known what this mysterious vulnerability is — that would give the game away to attackers hoping to exploit the hole before the patch is released to the public. Some OpenSSL's examples of "high severity" vulnerabilities are a server denial-of-service, a significant leak of server memory, and remote code execution. If you are a system administrator, get ready to patch your systems this week. The defect does not affect the 1.0.0 or 0.9.8 versions of the library.

+ - Nvidia Hopes To Sell More Chips By Bringing AI Programming To The Masses->

jfruh writes: Artificial intelligence typically requires heavy computing power, which can only help manufacturers of specialized chip manufacturers like Nvidia. That's why the company is pushing its Digits software, which helps users design and experiment with neural networks. Version 2 of digits moves out of the command line and comes with a GUI interface in an attempt to move interest beyond the current academic market; it also makes programming for multichip configurations possible.
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+ - Samsung Can't Make Galaxy S6 Phones Fast Enough->

jfruh writes: Samsung's profits were below expectations, but to look on the bright side, the reason is one that many companies want to have: so many people want to buy Galaxy S6 phones that the company can't make them fast enough to meet demand. The phone features curved glass that is tricky to manufacture.
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+ - Pressure mounts on Google to extend Right to Be Forgotten to US-> 1 1

Mark Wilson writes: The Right To Be Forgotten has proved controversial. A little over a year ago Google was told by a European court that it should accept requests to remove from search results pages that are "inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant". Now, calls for the scheme to be extended to the US are growing ever-louder.

Consumer Watchdog not only says that the Right To Be Forgotten should be brought to the US, but also that Google's refusal to do so is an "unfair and deceptive" business practice. The consumer group is writing to the Federal Trade Commission calling for the search giant to be investigated and forced to consider the removal of certain search results. As has been proved in Europe, it's something that is not without controversy.

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+ - World's First Road-Ready Line of 3D Printed Cars Unveiled Today by Local Motors->

ErnieKey writes: Phoenix-based Local Motors 3D printed their first Strati car last September, and has been going strong since, announcing the Project [Redacted] design challenge in June seeking input from their co-creation community for a road-ready 3D printed car design. A panel of judges reviewed more than 60 entries, and this morning the winners were announced, with Oregon-based Kevin Lo taking the Grand Prize for his design, a customizable vehicle called the Reload Redacted — Swim and Sport. The modular design includes both the 'Swim' and the 'Sport' body types, and both allow for customization and repair via snap modularity.
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Why did the Roman Empire collapse? What is the Latin for office automation?

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