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Submission + - Job, economy fears mix with hope for Class of '12 (

An anonymous reader writes: For the Class of 2012, the optimism of graduation is clouded by the uncertain aftermath of the worst economic slide since the Depression. Last year, graduates 24 and younger posted a 9.3 percent jobless rate; since then, there have been signs of progress.

Submission + - Oz govt pushes ahead with ISP customer data retention (

angry tapir writes: "The Australian federal government is pushing ahead with reforms that could see consumers' information kept on file for up to two years by ISPs. This could include the data retention of personal internet browsing information which intelligence agencies could access in the event of criminal activities by individuals or organisations."
Electronic Frontier Foundation

Submission + - House Committee Approves Internet Spy Policy (

E.I.A writes: Despite the collaborative efforts of scores of privacy advocates (EFF) and leaders of both Republican and Democratic interests, the H.R. 1981 bill has been approved. This bill will require ISPs to retain data on their customer's usage, and essentially criminalize anyone behind a monitor. Ne Boltai comrades!

Submission + - 22% in US Admit to Potential Abuse of Private Data (

Orome1 writes: 22% of US, 29% of Australian and 48% of British employees who have access to their employer’s or client’s private data, would feel comfortable doing something with that data, regardless if that access was intentional or accidental, according to a SailPoint survey. The survey also questioned if an employee would feel comfortable profiting from proprietary information by selling it on the Internet. While only 5% of American and 4% of Australian employees with access who answered the question selected this response, an alarming 24% of British employees with access said they would feel comfortable selling data.

Leveraging always beats prototyping.