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Submission + - AntiSec Hacks FBI Laptop, Leaks Over a Million iOS Device UDIDs (

hypnosec writes: Anonymous affiliated hacking collective Antisec has leaked more than a million records of Apple iOS Unique Identifies (UDIDs) that were present on an FBI laptop. The hackers have posted their message on a Pastebin whereby they have explained their motive behind the hack and how did they get hold of these records. Giving a reference to July 2012 NSA's General Keith Alexander speech at DefCon, whereby he urged hackers to help out the government in securing the Internet. The hacking collective said, “We decided we'd help out Internet security by auditing FBI first.”

Submission + - World's first Linux Ultrabook ships (

Rozzin writes: "Everyone here has heard of Dell's `Project Sputnik', but a little manufacturer of strictly Linux computers in California appears to have beat them to the punch: PCWorld reports that ZaReason has started shipping the world's first Linux Ultrabook. And they've somehow managed to fit 16 GB of RAM and two solid-state drives inside, along with a 6-hour battery and 14" display. CEO Cathy Malmrose explains: "It's one of my pet peeves that the world's most robust, high-end software is so often housed in low-end, unappealing machines or, worse, tweaked to work on machines that were built for Windows. Our goal is to build hardware that more aptly matches the high-end aspects of FOSS"."

Submission + - Bill Gates Takes the Stand in WordPerfect Trial

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Remember WorldPerfect? Bill Gates took the witness stand to defend his company against a $1 billion antitrust lawsuit that claims Microsoft duped Novell into thinking he would include WordPerfect in the new Windows system, then backed out because he feared it was too good. Gates testified Monday that Microsoft was racing to put out Windows 95 when he dropped technical features that would no longer support the rival's word processor and that in making the decision about the code, he was concerned not about Novell but about one element of the program that could have caused computers to crash. That code, technically known as "name space extensions," had to do with the display of folders and files. Novell attorney Jeff Johnson concedes that Microsoft was under no legal obligation to provide advance access to Windows 95 so Novell could prepare a compatible version but contends that Microsoft enticed Novell to work on a version, only to withdraw support months before Windows 95 hit the market. "We got stabbed in the back.""

Submission + - Facebook Hit By Coordinated Spam Attack

An anonymous reader writes: Over the last few days, Facebook users have been experiencing a flood of very graphic images depicting pornography, acts of violence, self-mutilation, and bestiality. The company confirmed the reports this morning and then this afternoon revealed that this has been the result of a coordinated spam attack leveraging a browser vulnerability.

Submission + - Analyzing Bulldozer: Why AMD's chip is so disappoi

An anonymous reader writes: AMD’s Bulldozer is finally here, after years of development — and its performance is significantly worse than anyone expected. The situation is ugly enough that it may explain why so many executives left AMD over the past twelve months, and why the company was so tight-lipped about their departure. Bulldozer’s general performance has been widely covered; our goal here is to drill into why the Bulldozer performs the way it does.

Submission + - UN Bigwig: 'The web" should have been patented and (

An anonymous reader writes: Cory Doctorow over at BoingBoing has unearthed an amazing video where the head of WIPO, the UN agency responsible for "promoting" intellectual property, suggests that Tim Berners-Lee should have patented HTML and licensed it to all users. Amazingly this is done on camera and in front of the head of CERN and the Internet Society, who look on in disbelief.
The Internet

Submission + - Trumpet Winsock creator made little money ( 1

omast writes: It appears that Peter Tattam, creator of Trumpet Winsock, got very little for this piece of software. For those of you who do not remember — or did not need it because were already outside the MS Windows world — Trumpet Winsock was a shareware program that provided TCP/IP functionality to Windows machines back in 1994-1995. It allowed millions to connect to the Internet back then; I was one of them.
According to the article, Tattam made very little money from the program as it was widely distributed but rarely paid for.


Submission + - Android Devices Are Hives of License Violations (

inkscapee writes: Android developers are paying little attention to Free/Open Source software licenses and have a 71% violation rate. Come on folks, FOSS licenses are easy to comply with, certainly easier than proprietary software licenses, and less punitive. But it seems even the tiny hoops that FOSS requires are too much for devs eager to cash in.

Submission + - Can For-Profit Tech Colleges Be Trusted? (

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Robert Scheier takes a closer look at for-profit IT-oriented colleges, questioning whether IT pros and employers can trust the quality of education on offer at institutions such as University of Phoenix, DeVry, ITT Tech, and Kaplan in the wake of increasing scrutiny for alleged deceptive practices that leave in high debt for jobs that pay little. 'For-profit schools carry a stigma in some eyes because of their reputation for hard sales pitches, aggressive marketing tactics, and saddling students with big loans for dubious degrees or certificates,' Scheier writes. 'Should IT pros looking to increase their skills, or people seeking to enter the IT profession, consider such for-profit schools? And should employers trust their graduates' skills?'"
Open Source

Submission + - LSE: What really went wrong with trading ( 1

DMandPenfold writes: The London Stock Exchange has made a U-turn on the system requirements placed on data vendors such as Thomson Reuters, Interactive Data and Bloomberg, after three weeks of problems since the launch of its new trading platform.

The decision, to fundamentally change the timing and systems around closing share price data recording, was made following a heated meeting with the providers that addressed significant disparities in quoted share prices.

The move has been widely welcomed by vendors, which provide share price data from the LSE to traders, and compete on speed and quality. A number of them had expressed real opposition ...

Submission + - Egypt's Mordor becomes a torrent of leaks

Weezul writes: In what Egyptian ex-pats are calling the Egyptian Bastille Day, protesters stormed the Egyptian state security services on Saturday 5 March, freeing victims of torture there, detaining security personnel, and have started publishing secret documents on facebook and twitter.
An Egyptian Twitter poster wrote "I almost can't believe I'm witnessing this. We're inside the fortress of terror, our very own Mordor..."

Among the more amusing discoveries has been a room full of sex tapes, including Arab royals like Kuwait's Princess.
The Internet

Submission + - US Gov.t Seeking Inputs on IANA

Demerara writes: As a member of ISOC, I just got this circular asking for inputs on an important review of IANA functions. I though it would be useful to broaden it to /.
The email reads: "Dear Chapter Delegates and Members, As you are probably aware, the Government of the United States released its long-awaited Notice of Inquiry on the IANA functions on Friday last week. I'm attaching a pdf version that is easier to read than the Federal Register version on their web site>. The deadline for comments is 31 March 2011, so we need to begin developing our response now. The evolution of the IANA function is an issue of immediate and great interest to all parts of ISOC and our companion organizations. I am seeking views from our membership on this important topic to use as inputs when developing the ISOC response to the NOI. I will also be drawing on the Board discussions of the IANA function that have taken place over the past few years. And finally, I will be coordinating with the other I* organizations. I do not believe we should try to develop a joint response to DoC, but we will want to ensure there are no surprises and, ideally, that there is broad general agreement in what we provide to the decision making process. It is my believe that the US government is sincerely hoping to get a broad range of responses from the US and elsewhere with concrete suggestions for improvement of the way the IANA function is handled. For example, they are hoping to hear clear statements about what this community wants; e.g., whether and why there should be changes to how the .arpa and/or the .int are treated in the contract, what should be the arrangements for the protocol parameters, etc. If the Internet technical community would like to see the US government make changes, we need to participate in this process to build a record of those recommendations. Thus I encourage you to send me your inputs by end of day Friday, 18 March, 2011. The NOI is quite detailed, as you will see. It describes the IANA function, and then goes on to ask questions in six areas. To paraphrase, those are: 1/ Whether the interdependent technical functions performed under the IANA should continue to be treated as interdependent, or if there should be changes to the present grouping? 2/ Recognizing that other Internet technical organizations' policies (e.g., IETF, IAB, RIRs, ccTLDs) impact on the performance of the IANA functions, should those be referred to and specified in the IANA functions contract and how? 3/ Should there be changes in the handling of root zone management requests requests pertaining to ccTLDs to address the concerns of some governments and ccTLD operators? 4/ Are the current performance metrics and reporting by the IANA functions operator adequate, or should there be changes? 5/ Are there improvements that should be made to the IANA functions contract to better address the needs of users of the IANA functions? Here the NOI specifically asks if additional information on the performance and administration of the IANA function would make the process more transparent? 6/ Should additional security considerations or enhancements be included in the requirements in the IANA functions contract? In every case, the NOI requests *specific* information and *specific* suggestions for improvements in the IANA contract. This may be an area where ISOC can contribute to the process in a very positive way. I would especially like to hear from you if you are in some direct way a participant or user of the IANA functions, and if you have any specific experience that indicates a need for improvement or alteration of the contract, and if so, what your specific recommendations would be. That kind of input would improve the depth and credibility of the ISOC response. Of course, as always, you are welcome to make your own direct comments to the process, but I would still very much appreciate hearing about your experiences and views. While I have not prepared text for the submission, in general, I would like to see ISOC explain how important it is to rely on the native Internet institutions to play appropriate roles where their expertise contributes to the smooth functioning of the Internet overall. Thus it is important that the roles of the IETF, IAB, RIRs, and ccTLD operators be recognized in the system, and that there is a need to build international confidence in how the IANA function is operated and administered. That includes the need to be more open, transparent and thus accountable in the administration of the process, to match the openness and transparency provided by the operator's extensive reporting. I also foresee suggesting that the stability of the IANA functions could be improved under different process than the current redrawing and renewing of relatively short term IANA functions contracts. I hope that you will read the full NOI, and I look forward to hearing your views on the questions it asks, your experiences, and your recommendations for improvement. Once again, to make it possible for me to prepare the ISOC input, please send me your inputs before end of day on March 18, 2011 or earlier if possible. Thank you in advance Bill"

"Consider a spherical bear, in simple harmonic motion..." -- Professor in the UCB physics department