Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: A few possible problems (Score 2) 317

by dHagger (#38630640) Attached to: Microsoft Patents Bad Neighborhood Detection

I can see a few possible problems with this.

1) Lag/delay in statistics. If the feature is abused as described in some of the posts above, an area considered safe can be unsafe for a while before the statistics catches up with reality. The opposite is also true; an area that has been "cleaned up" may be considered unsafe for a while.

2) Different types of violent crime. Not all violent crimes occur in the streets; domnestic violence is (at least where I live) considered a violent crime, and it is also a lot more common than unprovoked violence on the streets. At least that is what the police says - in the statistics they are bundled.

3) Seasonal / time of day differences. I live in a city that is flooded by tourists in the summer. Violent crimes increases significantly during those few months, and most of those crimes occur late evenings / nights when people at clubs/bars/pubs are drunk. Still, statistics for specific areas are compiled on a yearly basis.

4) In sparse areas, a single crime can have a huge impact in the statistics. Looking at statistics compiled "per capita", the area where I grew up had a 200% increase in violent crimes one year. It went from one case of domnestic violence to three - or 20/1000 per capita.

Comment: Depends... (Score 1) 569

by dHagger (#38169824) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Camera For Getting Into Photography?
It depends on if you would like to take good photos or store memories? My experience after owning and using various cameras ranging from cheap phone cameras up to a professional DSLR during the last 12 years, is that I use mobile cameras and pocket cameras for memories. But their small sensor makes them difficult to use in some situations, like low light or high contrast. DSLR's makes it easier to take stunning pictures, but their size/weight increases the risk that the camera is left at home and not used. In your situation, I would probably aim for something in between, like a Micro four thirds camera or a Sony NEX. Small enough to keep in a large pocket, large sensor that makes it easier to get shallow focus, and not as expensive as a pro DSLR. From there, you will probably notice how/when you are using it, and either be happy with it, or switch to a smaller or larger camera.
Transportation

+ - Britain Closes Airspace as Volcanic Ash Spreads

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens
Hugh Pickens writes "The NY Times reports that British civil aviation authorities ordered the closure of the country’s airspace as of noon on Thursday to shield aircraft from a high-altitude cloud of ash drifting south and east from an erupting volcano in Iceland. The perils of volcanic ash are well known to pilots and airline operators. After the 1982 eruption of Galunggung volcano in Indonesia, for example, a Boeing 747 flying from Kuala Lumpur to Perth, Australia, lost power in all four engines and descended from 36,000 feet to 12,500 feet before pilots could restart them and make an emergency landing in Jakarta. It was impossible to predict how long the disruptions might last or the extent of the flight cancellations, since the volcano was still erupting, says Deborah Seymour, a spokeswoman for Britain’s National Air Traffic Service. “We are completely and utterly hostage to weather conditions.""

Comment: Re:Learn to relax (Score 1) 153

by dHagger (#31451634) Attached to: Best Pre-Paid Data Plan For a Visit To Germany?
I find it easier to relax if I know I can quickly find whatever I'm looking for, like bringing up google maps when I get lost, or search for the address of whatever I intend to visit - instead of planing everything ahead in detail and bringing tons of maps, printouts and so on. My last visit to London, I spent an hour trying to find a theater using a regular map and street signs, so I had to run to make it in time. Using a phone with GPS and google maps, it would probably have taken 15 minutes, giving me plenty of time to relax.

Comment: Re:9.10 is buggy imo (Score 1) 244

by dHagger (#31336436) Attached to: Matt Asay Answers Your Questions About Ubuntu and Canonical

I can only agree. Using the same hardware since 7.04, I've seen improvements up to about 8.04. After that, it has gone downhill. Audio has gone from "good" to "horrible" in three versions (I'm going to wait and see if 10.04 improves things, or I will install OSS 4 instead). Things like Notify OSD was rushed/pushed out before it was ready. Changing monitor settings in Gnome requires the applet to be launched with root privileges from run/console instead from the menu to be able to apply the changes, at least on the various 8.10/9.04 laptops I have seen/used. Last time i tried KUbuntu (I don't remember if it was 9.04 or 9.10) multi-monitor support was not working at all.

The answers from Matt gives me the feeling they aim for "quantity" instead of "quality". I don't care if Ubuntu supports some rare hardware if I have major problems listening to music using a default Ubuntu install on some really common desktop hardware. I don't care if the new and shiny feature that replaced the old and proven feature has some nice touches, if this new feature is so incomplete/unfinished that it breaks things (like Notify OSD placing notifications outside the visible areas in some configurations, and no options whatsoever to move them back inside).

Comment: Re:Teach me something I can't with a Google search (Score 2, Insightful) 186

by dHagger (#30359060) Attached to: What Do You Look For In a Conference?
The problem with google is that it is both time-consuming and difficult to filter out the crap. The good thing about conferences and lectures (at least those I have attended) is that most of the crap has already been filtered by someone who knows about the subject. A good lecture usually get me thinking in new directions, talking about best practices and giving good advice - usually things that drowns in a flood of useless/amateur advice when using google.
The Almighty Buck

EA Flip-Flops On Battlefield: Heroes Pricing, Fans Angry 221

Posted by Soulskill
from the put-your-money-where-your-gun-is dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Ben Kuchera from Ars Technica is reporting that EA/DICE has substantially changed the game model of Battlefield: Heroes, increasing the cost of weapons in Valor Points (the in-game currency that you earn by playing) to levels that even hardcore players cannot afford, and making them available in BattleFunds (the in-game currency that you buy with real money). Other consumables in the game, such as bandages to heal the players, suffered the same fate, turning the game into a subscription or pay-to-play model if players want to remain competitive. This goes against the creators' earlier stated objectives of not providing combat advantage to paying customers. Ben Cousins, from EA/DICE, argued, 'We also frankly wanted to make buying Battlefunds more appealing. We have wages to pay here in the Heroes team and in order to keep a team large enough to make new free content like maps and other game features we need to increase the amount of BF that people buy. Battlefield Heroes is a business at the end of the day and for a company like EA who recently laid off 16% of their workforce, we need to keep an eye on the accounts and make sure we are doing our bit for the company.' The official forums discussion thread is full of angry responses from upset users, who feel this change is a betrayal of the original stated objectives of the game."

Comment: Re:Fedora vs. Ubuntu (Score 3, Interesting) 236

by dHagger (#29828747) Attached to: Fedora 12 Beta Released

..."brown, and shit"... was that intentional?

Seriously, I have to agree about Ubuntu. I've been using Ubuntu since 6.10, and for the last few releases things have deteriorated. They are pushing things into the distribution before they are ready and/or doing a poor job integrating them. Pulseaudio has never worked OK for me. Notification OSD does not work at all for me, placing notifications outside of the visible area, and replacing a system that works fine. Multi-monitor support (except for fixed configuration in xorg.conf) has been partially broken on all the 6-8 computers I've tried it on. The beta of Kubuntu 9.10 did not have working multi-monitor support at all!

So I'm currently running Windows 7, which beats the *brown* out of Ubuntu. At least on my new shiny hardware. I'm thinking about trying another distribution, just have not decided which one yet. Fedora sounds nice (especially the thing about improved sound and video), you recommend OpenSUSE, and I've also heard a lot of good things about Mandriva. Decisions, decisions...

Comment: Re:As an European who's been using linux desktop.. (Score 1) 311

by dHagger (#27968965) Attached to: Secret EU Open Source Migration Study Leaked

I have to agree that there are still maturity-problems. I have been using Ubuntu since "edgy", and each version since then has contained at least one annoying bug - a bug that would not be fixed until the next version.

For example, with "jaunty" I have at least three bugs related to pulseaudio that shows up on a daily basis. And a new notification-system that is so far from being ready that I would not even consider it as beta. These things were working fine in "intrepid"

With "intrepid", Evolution was more or less unusable due to some cache-bug (deleting the cache-folder resolved it for about a week at a time). Not a problem in "hardy" and fixed in "jaunty". This version also made Java-applications with a GTK interface so slow they became unusable (I used a few on a regular basis). This is still not fixed.

Before that, i experienced regressions with windows that would move on restart, windows that would refuse to open om my second screen, crashing media players, crackling sound and a few other annoyances - everything stuff that were working in the previous version.

And not to forget, this frequently requested feature has not been fixed in over six years!

But in my opinion, the sum of the pains are about the same with Windows and Ubuntu - so I'm sticking with Ubuntu and buy some beer to relax with for the money I save.

Comment: Re:So what? (Score 3, Informative) 410

by dHagger (#27621119) Attached to: Swedish Pirate Party Gains 3000 Members In 7 Hours

The stats from midnight (yes, it's just turned saturday here in Sweden) shows they now have 19693 members - a gain of 4868 members in 12 hours - almost 33%! That makes them the fifth largest party in Sweden, only 3226 members from number four - and almost 1/5 the size of the largest party (Socialdemokraterna) who has 100639 members. Adding to that, their youth organization is now the largest political youth group in Sweden with 9397 members ("Moderata ungdomsfÃrbundet" is second with 9153 members).

So what the numbers themselves are not that huge, but in relation to the numbers from the major parties - they become significant. Get the snowball rolling and the other parties might have to watch out.

It is starting to look like the conviction was the best thing that could have happened - a lot of people are upset and are doing what they can to change things!

Note: all numbers are from the pirate party webpage

Prediction is very difficult, especially of the future. - Niels Bohr

Working...