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Submission + - Removing libsystemd0 from a live-running Debian system ( 1

lkcl writes: The introduction of systemd has unilaterally created a polarisation of the GNU/Linux community that is remarkably similar to the monopolistic power position wielded by Microsoft in the late 1990s. Choices were stark: use Windows (with SMB/CIFS Services), or use UNIX (with NFS and NIS). Only the introduction of fully-compatible reverse-engineered NT Domains services corrected the situation. Instructions on how to remove systemd include dire warnings that "all dependent packages will be removed", rendering a normal Debian Desktop system flat-out impossible to achieve. It was therefore necessary to demonstrate that it is actually possible to run a Debian Desktop GUI system (albeit an unusual one: fvwm) with libsystemd0 removed. The reason for doing so: it doesn't matter how good systemd is believed to be or in fact actually is: the reason for removing it is, apart from the alarm at how extensive systemd is becoming (including interfering with firewall rules), it's the way that it's been introduced in a blatantly cavalier fashion as a polarised all-or-nothing option, forcing people to consider abandoning the GNU/Linux of their choice and to seriously consider using FreeBSD or any other distro that properly respects the Software Freedom principle of the right to choose what software to run. We aren't all "good at coding", or paid to work on Software Libre: that means that those people who are need to be much more responsible, and to start — finally — to listen to what people are saying. Developing a thick skin is a good way to abdicate responsibility and, as a result, place people into untenable positions.

Submission + - Watchdog Report Says N.S.A. Program Is Illegal and Should End (

schwit1 writes: An independent federal privacy watchdog has concluded that the National Security Agency’s program to collect bulk phone call records has provided only “minimal” benefits in counterterrorism efforts, is illegal and should be shut down.

The findings are laid out in a 238-page report, scheduled for release by Thursday, that represent the first major public statement by the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, which Congress made an independent agency in 2007 and only recently became fully operational.

Defenders of the program have argued that Congress acquiesced to that secret interpretation of the law by twice extending its expiration without changes. But the report rejects that idea as “both unsupported by legal precedent and unacceptable as a matter of democratic accountability.”

The report also scrutinizes in detail a handful of investigations in which the program was used, finding “no instance in which the program directly contributed to the discovery of a previously unknown terrorist plot or the disruption of a terrorist attack.”

Submission + - Blackhole Exploit Author Arrested In Russia (

judgecorp writes: Reports that the author of the Blackhole exploit kit has been arrested in Russia have been confirmed. The creator, called Paunch,has been nabbed, according to Troels Oerting, head of the European Cybercrime Centre. Blackhole was being updated daily until four days ago, which is more evidence of the arrest — although security researchers warn there are still functioning versions out there.

Submission + - China warns US as superpower expresses concern for $1.3 trillion loan (

Tuck News writes: China, the USA's biggest foreign creditor is warning Congress it must resolve the political impasse over the debt ceiling without further delay. China's Vice Foreign Minister, Zhu Guangyao, told America's deadlocked politicians on Monday that "the clock is ticking" and called on them to approve an extension of the national borrowing limit before the federal government is projected to run out of cash on 17 October, a date that is rapidly approaching.

Submission + - Bradley Manning spoke in court, like a man crushed by the state (

sfcrazy writes: Bradley Manning has spoken today in the court before his defense closed. He did not speak like a hero who wanted to expose the wrong doings. He did not speak like a hero who was willing to pay a heavy price for justice, ethics, morality and humanity.

Manning spoke like a man whose spirit was crushed by the state after years and years of solitary confinement which many would say was nothing short of torture.

Submission + - Vastly improved Raspberry Pi performance with Wayland

nekohayo writes: While Wayland/Weston 1.1 brought support to the Raspberry Pi merely a month ago, work has recently been done to bring true hardware-accelerated compositing capabilities to the RPi's graphics stack using Weston. The Raspberry Pi foundation has made an announcement about the work that has been done with Collabora to make this happen. developer Daniel Stone has written a blog post about this, including a video demonstrating the improved reactivity and performance. Developer Pekka Paalanen also provided additional technical details about the implementation.

Submission + - Egyptian Hacker hack ADOBE servers and dump 150,000 emails (

thn writes: "Egyptian Hacker hack ADOBE servers and dump 150,000 emails and hashed passwords of Adobe employees and customers/partner of the firm such as US Military, USAF, Google, Nasa DHL and many other companies.

Get news and database here :"


Submission + - Reiser4 File-System Still In Development (

An anonymous reader writes: Reiser4 still hasn't been merged into the mainline Linux kernel, but it's still being worked on by a small group of developers following Hans Reiser being convicted for murdering his wife. Reiser4 was updated in September on SourceForge to work with the Linux 3.5 kernel and has been benchmarked against EXT4, Btrfs, XFS, and ReiserFS. Reiser4 loses out in most of the Linux file-system performance tests, has much stigma due to Hans Reiser, and Btrfs is surpassing it feature-wise, so does it have any future in Linux ahead?

Submission + - ipv6 to older devices

An anonymous reader writes: My ISP gave me an ipv6 /64! That is a lot of addresses. I like it, but all is not well. Some devices are dual stack and ready to talk. But some devices are not dual stack and they need some help. NAT for ipv4 has been around a long time, and iptables NAT in the linux kernel has served me well. Now I need NVT (Network Version Translation). Is there some iptables mangle command or NVT command that will take and send it as 2607::192:168:1:1 and receive 2607::192:168:1:1 and translate to It could also be stated as NVT 2607::10:1:1:1 or<=>2607::10:10:10:1 Then iptables can be configured to have some addresses allowed and some stateful (default would be stateful). What about a single device inside — is there an ethernet dongle that will do 1 to 1 NVT? Would it have to be powered by POE or usb?

Submission + - US and EU Clash Over Whois Data (

itwbennett writes: "ICANN wants to store more data (including credit card information) about domain name registrations in its Whois database, wants to hold on to that data for two years after registration ends, and wants to force registrant contact information to be re-verified annually — moves that are applauded by David Vladeck, director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection. The E.U.'s Article 29 Working Group is markedly less enthusiastic, saying ICANN's plans trample on citizens' right to privacy."

Submission + - Oops! Sorry, we got it all wrong, IMF says ( 1

daem0n1x writes: Ireland, Greece and Portugal have been under draconian austerity measures after they have been forced to ask financial rescue from the IMF, in the aftermath of the 2008 bank crash. The results of these austerity measures are well known: Recession, unemployment and general social and economic meltdown.
After all this pain and suffering, the IMF suddenly finds a gigantic flaw in the formulas used to calculate the economic effects of austerity.
Well, at least they stepped forward to recognise they screwed up. But is it in still time for European and global economies to recover?
How is it possible that worldwide economic policies be conducted by such flawed systems? Numerous economists have been warning about this for years, but they faced deaf ears. Sounds familiar? Yes, just like before the subprime bubble bust.

Submission + - Flat lens focuses without distortion (

yahyamf writes: Applied physicists at the Harvard have created an ultrathin, flat lens that focuses light without the distortions of conventional lenses.

“Our flat lens opens up a new type of technology,” says principal investigator Federico Capasso. “We’re presenting a new way of making lenses. Instead of creating phase delays as light propagates through the thickness of the material, you can create an instantaneous phase shift right at the surface of the lens. It’s extremely exciting.”


Submission + - Microsoft Sends DMCA Notices To Legitimate Websites

An anonymous reader writes: In the past couple of days, a bunch of technology sites received a DMCA takedown notice from Microsoft (through Google). NGOHQ and PowerArchiver for hosting screenshot(s) of Windows 8 RTM while their forum users were criticizing the new Metro UI. BetaNews received a notice for posting a link to the Windows 8 Developer Preview.

Submission + - Vanilla JS Used On More Sites Than jQuery (

mikejuk writes: If you are looking for a new framework to help you build a web site, then you need to know about Vanilla JS. This is the most powerful and lightweight of all the frameworks. It is already in use by a huge number of websites and autodownloaded by most browsers. Benchmarks show that the best alternative framework is less more than twice as slow and everyone's favourite jQuery is four times slower. Just think of all that speed you are giving up! Other benchmarks reveal an even bigger advantage for Vanilla JS .

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