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Journal: there != their

Journal by cyborch

It seems that a lot of people have a lot of trouble discerning the difference between "there" and "their".

With the signature space being too small (120 characters) to even have two links to dictionary.com I have nowhere else to write but in my journal, hoping to reach out and educate the American public (and anyone else, who does not know the difference between "there" and "their.")

While there is little difference in pronounciation between the words "there" and "their," there is a big difference in meaning. It seems that a lot of people write like they speak. Luckily our written language is different from our spoken language.

Wile it wud be possibel to understan words writen lik they are pronounced it wud look very ugly. I wud luv to see more attemts made to write properly rather than writin simply wat we pronounce.

Quote from dictionary.com:
there Pronunciation Key (thâr)
adv.

1. At or in that place: sit over there.
2. To, into, or toward that place: wouldn't go there again.
3. At that stage, moment, or point: Stop there before you make any more mistakes.
4. In that matter: I can't agree with him there.

pron.

1. Used to introduce a clause or sentence: There are numerous items. There must be another exit.
2. Used to indicate an unspecified person in direct address: Hello there.

adj.

1. Used especially for emphasis after the demonstrative pronoun that or those, or after a noun modified by the demonstrative adjective that or those: That person there ought to know the directions to town.
2. Nonstandard. Used for emphasis between a demonstrative adjective meaning "that" or "those" and a noun: No one is sitting at that there table. Them there beans ought to be picked.

n.

That place or point: stopped and went on from there.

interj.

Used to express feelings such as relief, satisfaction, sympathy, or anger: There, now I can have some peace!

their Pronunciation Key (thâr)
adj. The possessive form of they.

1. Used as a modifier before a noun: their accomplishments; their home town. 2. Usage Problem. His, her, or its: "It is fatal for anyone who writes to think of their sex" (Virginia Woolf).

It's later than you think, the joint Russian-American space mission has already begun.

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