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Comment: Re:I know i'm going to get zapped by this but... (Score 1) 199

I think so but at the same time it reminds me of "old school" cable where people were buying the Mike Tyson fight and charging for it, i personally saw the Tyson and Holyfield fight (Tyson bit off his ear) and had to pay $20.00 for it and it lasted what? Fifteen seconds? Thank god the $20.00 paid for beer afterward.

That seems to be the problem in my mind, the Companies concerned are not getting a cut of that revenue.

Comment: I know i'm going to get zapped by this but... (Score 1, Interesting) 199

I found out about Popcorn time from Huffington post last week and used it 3 times. It was amazing. If you did not get the chance to see it then, too bad. Netflix sucks by comparison for something that lasted 4 day's.

Now as for legality, I feel something might have been illegal about it (hehe) but i wish it were not. I am totally unashamed about what i did. It truly was something to see.

+ - NASA Offers Bounty for Improved Asteroid Detection Algorithms

Submitted by Hugh Pickens DOT Com
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Dara Kerr reports at CNET that NASA is launching an "Asteroid Data Hunter" contest to reach out to people to help create algorithms that identify asteroids in images captured by ground-based telescopes and will give away $35,000 in awards to competition winners. The winning solution must increase the detection sensitivity, minimize the number of false positives, ignore imperfections in the data, and run effectively on all computer systems. "Current asteroid detection initiatives are only tracking one percent of the estimated objects that orbit the Sun," says Chris Lewicki. "We are excited to partner with NASA in this contest to help increase the quantity and knowledge about asteroids that are potential threats, human destinations, or resource rich." NASA's goal is to discover those unknown asteroids and then track and characterize them. For the contest, citizen scientists will be allowed to study images taken from ground-based telescopes to see if they can develop improved algorithms for identifying asteroids. If dangerous asteroids are found, NASA could determine if they'd be viable for a re-direction into a lunar orbit. “For the past three years, NASA has been learning and advancing the ability to leverage distributed algorithm and coding skills through the NASA Tournament Lab to solve tough problems," said Jason Crusan, NASA Tournament Lab director. "We are now applying our experience with algorithm contests to helping protect the planet from asteroid threats through image analysis.”"

+ - Both Genders Think Women Are Bad at Basic Math->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Think women can’t do math? You’re wrong—but new research shows you might not change your mind, even if you get evidence to the contrary. A study of how both men and women perceive each other's mathematical ability finds that an unconscious bias against women--by both genders--could be skewing hiring decisions, widening the gender gap in mathematical professions like engineering."
Link to Original Source

+ - Scientists Build Thinnest Possible LEDs->

Submitted by minty3
minty3 (2942557) writes "LEDs are commonly found in TV screens, computer monitors and light bulbs. While the light sources are known to be small, scientists have recently built the thinnest possible LEDS using tungsten diselenide. The nano-sized LEDs are arguably stronger and more energy efficient than their thicker counterparts."
Link to Original Source

+ - How Engineers Are Building A Power Station At The South Pole

Submitted by KentuckyFC
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "One of the more ambitious projects at the South Pole is the Askaryan Radio Array, a set of radio antennas under the ice that will listen for the tell tale signals of high energy neutrinos passing by. This array will eventually be over a thousand times bigger than the current largest neutrino detector: Icecube, which monitors a cubic kilometre of ice next door to the planned new observatory. But there's a problem. How do you supply 24/7 power to dozens of detectors spread over such a vast area in the middle of the Antarctic? The answer is renewable energy power stations that exploit the sun during the summer and the wind all year round. The first of these stations is now up and running at the South Pole and producing power. It is also helping to uncover and iron out the various problems that these stations are likely to encounter. For example; where to put the batteries needed to supply continuous power when all else fails. The team's current approach is to bury the battery to protect it from temperature extremes. That works well but makes maintenance so difficult that scaling this approach to dozens of power stations doesn't seem feasible. That's a problem for the future but for the moment, green power has finally come to the white continent."

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