Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: OT, but true story (Score 0) 138

by cvd6262 (#37288798) Attached to: NYT Working On 'Magic Mirror' For Bathroom Surfing

I once house-sat for a wealthy family in my parents' neighborhood. One of their bathrooms was all mirrors: Every vertical surface was a mirror.

"Hey, this is cool, I thought."

Yeah, then I used the bathroom once and realized that wherever I looked I got a eyefull of myself. I used the other bathroom the rest of the week.

Comment: Re:Patents as well (Score 1) 323

by cvd6262 (#35951572) Attached to: Copyright Law Is Killing Science

Government work should be public domain and PHD thesis I think are required to be.

That's news to me. My PhD dissertation is copyright by me, although I granted my university and my country's national library the right to distribute it.

One of my colleagues saw his dissertation popup on a fee-based site. He couldn't do anything about it because, technically, his degree-granting institution (University of Kentucky) owned the work and they sold the distribution to the site.

So when I passed my defense and formatted my document, I included a (CC)-By-SA notice on the second page.

Comment: Re:Different Services need to be split (Score 2) 209

by Gates82 (#35031562) Attached to: Netflix Compares ISP Streaming Performance

Mod parent WAY up.

The first thing I thought when I looked at the graphs, what service plan are these people on. Most I know have the cheapest package they can find with connection speed upper bound at 1.5-5mbs. At those speeds the throughput Netflix is reporting look pretty good. I have a 20mbs connection (from an ISP not listed in the report) and over the summer I routinely streamed MLB.com (@ 8mbs), the wife would have a Netflix movie on her laptop, and the kids watching some show from Netflix as well. Aggregate bandwidth requirements were roughly 15mbs.

It fits: you get what you pay for, though I don't defend the prices or lack of sustained rate one typically finds with ISP's. I just found that good hardware, a decent home network configuration, and staying away from the cheapest bottom rung plan tend to go a long way.>/p>

--
So who is hotter? Ali or Ali's Sister?

Comment: True, but... (Score 2) 95

by cvd6262 (#34738556) Attached to: <em>Super Mario Bros. 3</em> Level Design Lessons

DKCR could take some lessons on "introducing slowly." There are too many segments where trial and death are the only way to figure out how to pass a level. When I first came upon a giant-hippo-on-a-stick, I actually stopped to think about WTF I was supposed to do. There is no indication that you can bounce on it, there is no warning that doing so will lower the hippo, etc.

The level designers also seem to have spent a lot of time planning pitfalls so the only way to pass many levels is rote memorization. That may be classic, but it's not fun.

The spider hoard race is a rare exception.

Comment: I agree - for large lectures (Score 1) 804

by cvd6262 (#34710632) Attached to: Should Colleges Ban Classroom Laptop Use?

I had that same idea when I was an undergrad (in the USA). The course outcome should be important, and if I can gain the skills/knowledge without attending, then why require me to attend? When I started teaching underclassmen as a grad student, I even instituted an attendance-optional policy.

But then I became a professor and had the luxury of teaching small upper-level and graduate courses. My belief that the instructor was not the source of all knowledge was reinforced, but so was the understanding that *real* learning happened between students. When a student did not attend our discussions, they deprived us all of their point of view.

So, for large lectures, I agree with you. Use the Western Governors University model (sell assessment and certification/accreditation, not instruction). But for small, meaningful classes, I still require attendance.

Comment: ACC was right! (Score 4, Interesting) 115

by cvd6262 (#33825044) Attached to: Saturn's Rings Formed From Large Moon Destruction

In 2001, ACC pointed out the odd coincidence between the ring of Saturn being only 4 million years old, and the time when the Monolith appeared on Earth. Hmmmmmm.

BTW - The book has the large monolith at Saturn, not Jupiter. Kubrick was worried about the FX it would take to portray the rings on film, so they changed it to Jupiter.

The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness. -- John Muir

Working...