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Comment: Re:Just like the economy (Score 1) 118

by cusco (#48549469) Attached to: How One Man Changed the Ecology of the Great Lakes With Salmon

Has the situation of any native species ever improved because of the magical market forces? Ever? I can't think of one. Buffalo, beavers, wolves, condors, redwoods, otters, etc. would all be extinct if the top-down management had allowed "actors look out for their own interests". Individual people are myopic short-term actors, only when we band into larger organizations is anything worthwhile ever accomplished.

Comment: Re:Fear the Asian carp (Score 1) 118

by cusco (#48549339) Attached to: How One Man Changed the Ecology of the Great Lakes With Salmon

Carp and suckers are fairly fatty fish, you don't want to fry or bake them really. They're OK grilled, but they're outstanding in a smoker. The fat drips down and burns and everyone in the neighborhood knows that something delicious is about to be available. You may become very popular for an afternoon . . .

Comment: Re:Paradoxes Be Damned (Score 1) 334

by cusco (#48534709) Attached to: Aliens Are Probably Everywhere, Just Not Anywhere Nearby

They are the same, everywhere in the Universe.

Not even Einstein would have claimed that. We have barely crossed the heliopause, and you can claim that we know that physics works exactly the same everywhere? (I'm assuming you mean physics, because nothing anyone has said would entail numeric systems being invalidated.) Rather arrogant, isn't it? As far as we can tell there are somewhere between 7 and 29 dimensions, of which we have only very limited knowledge of three (four if you consider time a dimension). Try reading 'Flatland' for a hint at how some of those other dimensions might interact with ours.

 

Comment: Re:Paradoxes Be Damned (Score 1) 334

by cusco (#48533041) Attached to: Aliens Are Probably Everywhere, Just Not Anywhere Nearby

Nearly everything we see falls neatly in the ranges predicted by scientific theories.

That is at least in part because the ranges predicted by the theories are what we're monitoring. CERN for example automatically discards 99.many-9s of the data generated by their tests without even analyzing it, just because of the sheer volume of data created. For 70%-90% of the mass and energy in the universe we don't even have a way to detect it yet, much less analyze anything more than the galactic-level properties of it.

Comment: Re:Paradoxes Be Damned (Score 1) 334

by cusco (#48532927) Attached to: Aliens Are Probably Everywhere, Just Not Anywhere Nearby

So the fact that it's just been in the last 20 years that we've realized that we can't even detect 70-90% of all the matter and energy in the universe except at the galactic level doesn't humble you at all? We have it all figured out? Up until a few centuries ago we had 50 millenia of "hard science" showing that the oceans could not be crossed by mariners. Today we have 15 year-old girls who do it single-handed. I hope you like surprises, the future is full of them.

Comment: Re:In Reverse (Score 1) 75

by cusco (#48448731) Attached to: Extreme Shrimp May Hold Clues To Alien Life On Europa

I believe it was Arthur Clarke who I heard speculate that we may have already encountered other sentient life and just not recognized it. If something lived so slowly that it took decades or years to form a coherent thought we would never have the patience to talk to it (even if we could figure out how). If something lived so quickly that it was here and gone in a day it wouldn't have the patience to talk to us. For some long-lived species a trip between stars that lasted a thousand years, to us essentially an impossibility, might be the equivalent of an evening parking on Lover's Lane.

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