Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: ADM still incredibly powerful (Score 1) 155

by currivan (#29562009) Attached to: The Informant Is Back At Work

When I read the book a few years ago, the most striking thing was that the names Archer Daniels Midland and Dwayne Andreas didn't appear on the cover or liner notes, and I actually had to look pretty deep in the book to figure out what company he worked for.

Now that ADM pleaded guilty and paid a $100 million fine, their lawyers have less to work with, but at the time the publisher was apparently pretty scared of them. The book is also exceedingly careful about alleging that the Andreases knew how their company did business.

Comment: Here's the Netflix thread where Koren leaks he won (Score 1) 100

by currivan (#28867155) Attached to: Netflix Prize Contest Ends, Down To the Wire
http://www.netflixprize.com/community/viewtopic.php?id=1498

"Thanks. In fact, this is a very happy day for us - our team is top contender for winning the Grand Prize, as we have a better Test score than The Ensemble. (Probably this is the first post revealing this in the forum smile)"

Also, Yehuda Koren is at Yahoo now, not AT&T.

Comment: Re:Published scores irrelevant (Score 1) 100

by currivan (#28866989) Attached to: Netflix Prize Contest Ends, Down To the Wire
I don't think this is quite clear. The teams submit their predictions on a qualifying set of about 1.8 million user/movie pairs. Half of these are used for the published leaderboard rankings, and the other half secretly scored for the actual prize. What the teams don't know is which user/movie ratings are in which half. The teams aren't submitting programs that Netflix runs though, they're submitting predictions on the whole quiz set.
Privacy

Rep. Jane Harman Focus In Yet Another Warrantless Wiretap Scandal 312

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the irony-makes-head-asplode dept.
Many different sources are talking about the latest scandal surrounding the warrantless wiretapping program. Incriminating evidence against California rep. Jane Harman was apparently captured some time ago on a legal NSA wiretap. However, Attorney General Gonzales supposedly intervened to drop the case against her because (and this is where the irony meter explodes) Bush officials wanted her to be able to publicly defend the warrantless wiretap program. "Jane Harman, in the wake of the NSA scandal, became probably the most crucial defender of the Bush warrantless eavesdropping program, using her status as 'the ranking Democratic on the House intelligence committee' to repeatedly praise the NSA program as 'essential to US national security' and 'both necessary and legal.'"
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Another perspective on intellectual property

Submitted by joejor
joejor (578266) writes "With so much controversy over intellectual property rights in software development, it may be instructive (or at least entertaining) to look at another human endeavor that suffers from stolen ideas: stand-up comedy. Radar magazine has an article that describes the long history of cribbing and theft in comedy, by big names and small.

Given the nature of stand-up, where source material has to be broadcast from performer to audience, it often happens that one performer will hear another's bits and incorporate the funniest ones into his own act, without attribution. The perspectives of the comedians interviewed range from enlightened to downright hateful (hmm, sounds familiar).

Choice quote from TFA: "People take plagiarism so seriously in all other forms of media, whether it's music, newspapers, books ... But with comedy, it's like, 'You're on your own.'""
Patents

+ - Congress Tackles Patent Reform

Submitted by nadamsieee
nadamsieee (708934) writes "Wired's Luke O'Brian recently reported about Congress' latest attempt to reform the patent system. In the article O'Brian tells of how "[w]itnesses at Thursday's hearing painted a bleak picture of that system. Adam Jaffe, a Brandeis University professor and author of a book on the subject, described the system as "out of whack." Instead of "the engine of innovation," the patent has become "the sand in the gears," he said, citing widespread fears of litigation." The House Oversight Committee website has more details. How would you fix the patent system?"
Businesses

+ - WebDataWatch.com released cutting edge data servic

Submitted by
Karen
Karen writes "WebDataWatch.com releases a cutting edge data service for ISP, "Hosting Report".

This report is a detailed domain analysis for hosing company and ISP. It includes multiple aspects regarding to hosting company's customer, e.g. the domain list, Google rank, customer churn, internal server move, subnet users, customers, domain expiry, DNS service provider, DNS errors and warnings etc.

With the data from WebDataWatch.com, web hosting companies, ISP and other internet user can discover the valuable customers from their competitors and achieve unfair advantage over their competitors. On the other hand, the detailed reports can improve the internal management of hosting company by providing accurate, up to date data. The services provided by WebDataWatch.com could be handy tools for both marketing and management. The data from WebDataWatch.com can also serve as a reference for those companies who are attempting acquiring, selling or studying hosting companies.

The database is updated on a monthly basis and the report is available on company license basis. On the first day of every month, WebDataWatch.com resolves the IP address of about 90 million domains in approximately 24 to 48 hours. Each ISP is studied based on their IP block, domain owners, domain popularity, and domain changes, DNS usage and web servers etc.

Further information and sample reports are available on www.webdatawatch.com."
Google

+ - New search Feature in Google

Submitted by
Voelspriet
Voelspriet writes "Its not perfect, but hey, its new. Google accepts all kind of new search words. Type employees and a name of a company in Google. Now you know: Yahoo has more employees then Google. Says who? Wikipedia. Google recognizes the keywords from the info box on many pages. But thats not all. What was a label of popgroup Queen? Googles answers Queen — Label: Parlophone and links to Amazon in the UK (but it doesnt say sponsored link). Ever wonder what genre Slayer is?

If you want to know what is the religion of India, Google suggests you to visit .. Yahoo for the answer. Ever wondered what my time zone is? The language in Canada? Now you know. The internet TLD of Tokelau? Yup, still .tk. But who says so? Google quotes Arthistoryclub.com, but this site based its information on the CIA World Factbook of 2004.

Sometimes the information is from 2003 or older, sometimes it isnt complete: IBM is there, Indian Railways not. So how does Google decide which source to use? I counted over 100 different sources. It appears Google is simply parsing the "Infobox_Company" from the Wikipedia and other similar templates from other online sources, thanks Frank for pointing this out to me."
Media

Canadian Copyright Group Wants iPod Tax 408

Posted by kdawson
from the oh-and-5-bucks-for-the-earbuds dept.
soulxtc writes "Unable to define memory as a 'recording medium,' Canada's Private Copyright Collective goes directly after portable music player devices, memory cards, and anything else that can be used to make private copies. The PCC submitted a proposal to the country's Copyright Board that suggests levies of $5 (Canadian) on devices with up to 1GB of memory, $25 for 1-10 GB, $50 for 10-30 GB, and $75 for over 30 GB. If approved, this propoal would increase the price of a 30-GB iPod by 26%. These collections are intended to compensate artists and labels for the losses they suffer when people 'illegally' copy or transfer music. The PCC is also seeking a new $2 to $10 tax on memory cards. The backbone of digital photography has become tangled up in the fight for making sure music companies get every nickel and dime they feel that they deserve."
Censorship

+ - Google News and Censorship: Is this a Pattern?

Submitted by Jon Meyer
Jon Meyer (666) writes "The Google YouTube handling of Nick Gisburne is very similar to their News page's handling of Uruknet.

According to Alexa, the web-ranking organization, Uruknet is highly rated as an Iraqi news source. Yet, with no convincing reason, in late January Google delisted Uruknet from Google News. A campaign to restore Uruknet to Google News is underway. See this link for the full story.

Does the YouTube incident, Uruknet and Google's recent defusing of Google Bombs indicate the search giant is entering a new phase of more strident and direct information censorship?"

Passwords are implemented as a result of insecurity.

Working...