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Comment: Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (Score 1) 915

by curio_city (#39008643) Attached to: Journalist Arrested By Interpol For Tweet
From the GP:

There are upstanding, progressive regimes in Europe where there are literally things you can say that don't involve a threat of violence or which won't cause immediate danger to those around you

(emphasis mine)

Just another sign of Muslim-haters' complete intolerance, and insistence on ignoring counter-attitudinal information.

Comment: Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (Score 1) 915

by curio_city (#39008329) Attached to: Journalist Arrested By Interpol For Tweet
From GP:

There are upstanding, progressive regimes in Europe where there are literally things you can say that don't involve a threat of violence or which won't cause immediate danger to those around you

(emphasis mine)

Just another sign of Muslim-haters' complete intolerance, and that some will think whatever they wish, regardless of what they read. Score 5: Insightful? Really?

Comment: Magic pots of money (Score 1) 709

by curio_city (#38183082) Attached to: California Going Ahead With Bullet Train

I keep hearing that "we just don't have the money to fund education, the students have to bear some burden"; here my legislature is ready to fund a rail project mainly for the sake of creating (shovel) jobs, instead of increasing access to and the quality of education so that more people in the state have the resources to create jobs themselves through their business and innovation.

Then I read that these "leaders" have no idea where the money's going to come from, but they're hoping we'll be generally more prosperous later, in a state that spends more on prisons than it does on higher education.

+ - Wiki editor helps reveal pre-9/11 CIA mistakes->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Kevin Fenton was reading the Department of Justice's 2004 Inspector General report on pre-9/11 intelligence failures. Parts of it didn't make sense to him, so he decided to add the information in the report to Paul Thompson's 9/11 timeline at the wiki-style website History Commons. Eventually, Fenton's work led him to uncover the identity of a CIA manager who ran the Bin Ladin unit before 9/11, when agents there deliberately withheld information about two 9/11 hijackers from the FBI. That manager was named Richard Earl Blee and he is now the subject of a documentary by Ray Nowosielski and John Duffy, of secrecykills.org, who confirmed his identity using journalism techniques right out of the 70s film "All the President's Men". Blee, along with Cofer Black and George Tenet, have found the work disturbing enough to release a joint statement denying some of the allegations."
Link to Original Source

Comment: But the point of a pseudonym (Score 1) 283

by curio_city (#37057604) Attached to: Fake Names On Social Networks, a Fake Problem
is to not give your real name to other users or to corporations we don't trust.

The requirement is there to help the corporations, not their users. (snip...)

would do 99% of the work of verifying identity.

A legitimate attempt at verifying users' identities is exactly what I don't want; it makes their data more valuable, and for the benefit of using a nickname in front of people I already know? I'm more concerned about Facebook et al. getting my personal information than my friends. Also, with a credit card charge, it's not just your name that they get; they get a billing address too.

Comment: Re:Don't have to out the customer (?) (Score 1) 195

by curio_city (#36730076) Attached to: Banks Find Way To Sell Consumers' Shopping Data

You can use them to uniquely identify each picture in the email and associate it with a uniqueid or campaign.

If the only trackers were for the campaign as I proposed, there shouldn't be an issue. Perhaps I should refrain from assuming this is what will happen though.

It will more than likely be email. It's cheapest to implement.

...

They can now link all of the information I provided them with the demographics they purchased.

Agreed, an online purchase would be difficult to claim without selling out the customer, which is why I was thinking more along the lines of a print-out coupon. The transaction itself, then, does not give the merchant free personal data, and neither should the bank claiming its commission. As long as actually obtaining the coupon does not require any loss of privacy.....

Some people claim that the UNIX learning curve is steep, but at least you only have to climb it once.

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