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Comment: Re:This is like skipping vaccines (Score 1) 716

by cswan (#42172627) Attached to: Just Say No To College

Precisely. I would venture to guess that Zuckerberg doesn't look through the white pages for physicians that are self-educated college dropouts. I bet he also does not live in a building that was designed by a self-educated structural engineer, drive a car that was designed and built by a college dropout, or get his prescription medications from "Jimmy, the self-taught child pharmacist."

Our society is built upon the knowledge structure that we've built up. Someone who went to college would probably realize such things.

Math

Ranking Soccer Players By Following the Bouncing Ball 142

Posted by timothy
from the well-it-ain't-baseball dept.
sciencehabit excerpts from an interesting report on statistics for soccer, in the stats-obsessed world of sports: "Only a handful of soccer ranking systems exist, most of which rely on limited information: the number of goals scored in a match, the number of goals assisted, and some indices of a match's difficulty and importance. ... So researchers turned to an unlikely source: social networks. Applying the kinds of mathematical techniques used to map Facebook friends and other networks, the team created software that can trace the ball's flow from player to player. As the program follows the ball, it assigns points for precise passing and for passes that ultimately lead to a shot at the goal. Whether the shot succeeds doesn't matter. Only the ball's flow toward the goal and each player's role in getting it there factors into the program's point system, which then calculates a skill index for each team and player."

Comment: Re:I saw the meteor (Score 1) 163

by cswan (#31870612) Attached to: Meteor Spotted Yesterday Over Midwestern United States

The video above does it some justice. I was quite a distance away (St. Louis), though it sure looked like it was falling nearby. Bright, traffic-light green body and tail, lasting maybe 5-6 seconds of its descent. When the object disintegrated it burst into a ball of yellow/orange, and looked not unlike the explosive, expanding shells they put off during the 4th of July.

Awesome sight. The trajectory must have been very horizontal for the tail to have been so long, and it must have disintegrated very high up in the atmosphere for it to be viewable over such a large area.

Windows

New Crossover Release With Improved Compatibility 104

Posted by kdawson
from the lin-win dept.
solanum writes "On March 2nd Crossover 9.0 was released. CrossOver 9 features a new user interface that focuses on making installation of Windows software quicker and easier than previous versions. Another new feature is CrossOver's ability to download installation 'recipes' directly from CodeWeavers online Compatibility Database. 'If another CrossOver user has figured out how to use CrossOver to install a Windows application, they can upload that installation recipe to our database,' said Jeremy White, CodeWeavers chief executive officer. 'As we go forward, and build this online storehouse, CrossOver will begin to automatically install that same application for other users. This enables us to move closer to a world where CrossOver will begin to run the majority of Windows apps, and not just an officially supported subset. In other words, our diabolical plot for world domination is going exactly as planned,' he added. Early reviews and comments are positive, and my own experience is that many more Windows applications work in this new version than previously."
Image

Man Swallows USB Flash Drive Evidence 199

Posted by samzenpus
from the chew-it-up dept.
SlideRuleGuy writes "In a bold and bizarre attempt to destroy evidence seized during a federal raid, a New York City man grabbed a flash drive and swallowed the data storage device while in the custody of Secret Service agents. Records show Florin Necula ingested the Kingston flash drive shortly after his January 21 arrest outside a bank in Queens. A Kingston executive said it was unclear if stomach acid could damage one of their drives. 'As you might imagine, we have no actual experience with someone swallowing a USB.' I imagine that would be rather painful. But did he follow his mother's advice and chew thoroughly, first? Apparently not, as the drive was surgically recovered."
Image

Scientists Discover Booze That Won't Give You a Hangover 334

Posted by samzenpus
from the go-ahead-and-have-another dept.
Kwang-il Kwon and Hye Gwang Jeong of Chungnam National University have discovered that drinking alcohol with oxygen bubbles added leads to fewer hangovers and a shorter sobering up time. People drinking the bubbly booze sobered up 20-30 minutes faster and had less severe and fewer hangovers than people who drank the non-fizzy stuff. Kwon said: "The oxygen-enriched alcohol beverage reduces plasma alcohol concentrations faster than a normal dissolved-oxygen alcohol beverage does. This could provide both clinical and real-life significance. The oxygen-enriched alcohol beverage would allow individuals to become sober faster, and reduce the side effects of acetaldehyde without a significant difference in alcohol's effects. Furthermore, the reduced time to a lower BAC may reduce alcohol-related accidents."
Handhelds

TI-Nspire Hack Enables User Programming 88

Posted by Soulskill
from the done-and-done dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Texas Instruments' most recent, ARM-based series of graphing calculators, the TI-Nspire line, has long resisted users' efforts to run their own software. (Unlike other TI calculator models, which can be programmed either in BASIC, C, or assembly language, the Nspire only supports an extremely limited form of BASIC.) A bug in the Nspire's OS was recently discovered, however, which can be exploited to execute arbitrary machine code. Now the first version of a tool called Ndless has been released, enabling users, for the first time, to write and run their own C and assembly programs on the device. This opens up exciting new possibilities for these devices, which are extremely powerful compared to TI's other calculator offerings, but (thanks to the built-in software's limitations) have hitherto been largely ignored by the calculator programming community."
Open Source

Linux Kernel 2.6.32 Released 195

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the download-compile-reboot-repeat dept.
diegocg writes "Linus Torvalds has officially released the version 2.6.32 of the Linux kernel. New features include virtualization memory de-duplication, a rewrite of the writeback code faster and more scalable, many important Btrfs improvements and speedups, ATI R600/R700 3D and KMS support and other graphic improvements, a CFQ low latency mode, tracing improvements including a 'perf timechart' tool that tries to be a better bootchart, soft limits in the memory controller, support for the S+Core architecture, support for Intel Moorestown and its new firmware interface, run-time power management support, and many other improvements and new drivers. See the full changelog for more details."
Books

100 Years of Copyright Hysteria 280

Posted by kdawson
from the frothy-mouths dept.
Nate Anderson pens a fine historical retrospective for Ars Technica: a look at 100 years of Big Content's fearmongering, in their own words. There was John Philip Sousa in 1906 warning that recording technology would destroy the US pastime of gathering around the piano to sing music ("What of the national throat? Will it not weaken? What of the national chest? Will it not shrink?"). There was the photocopier after World War II. There was the VCR in the 1970s, which a movie lobbyist predicted would result in tidal waves, avalanches, and bleeding and hemorrhaging by the music business. He compared the VCR to the Boston Strangler — in this scenario the US public was a woman home alone. Then home taping of music, digital audio tape, MP3 players, and Napster, each of which was predicted to lay waste to entire industries; and so on up to date with DVRs, HD radio, and HDTV. Anderson concludes with a quote from copyright expert William Patry in his book Moral Panics and the Copyright Wars: "I cannot think of a single significant innovation in either the creation or distribution of works of authorship that owes its origins to the copyright industries."
Real Time Strategy (Games)

Command & Conquer MMO a Possibility? 159

Posted by Soulskill
from the +1-sandbag-of-blocking dept.
TheProphet92 sends along a speculative piece about the future of EA's popular RTS franchise, writing: "EA's real-time strategy games don't have the luxury of extensive funding the way some other franchises do. EA has been milking their game engines for all they're worth and then some. They have been using various versions of the 'Sage' engine for the past half-dozen or so RTS games, and they need money to make a new one. Perhaps an MMO is the way to go for EA, using none other than their famous Command & Conquer franchise."

Comment: Re:More on this.... (Score 1) 240

by cswan (#19086819) Attached to: Electronic Frontier Foundation Sues Uri Geller
The difference is that even if there is no deity, the majority religions still provide useful and positive services to their members. There are some whackjobs in organized religion to be sure, but most clergy by whatever name they're called, as well as most believers, are good, honest people who try to do right in the world and from time to time succeed.

As soon as religions start getting taxed like every other major entity in the U.S., I'll agree with your sentiments. In their current state they are not providing a net positive effect on society through these 'good works' they're supposedly engaging in.

10 to the 12th power microphones = 1 Megaphone

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