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Comment: Re:But she still can... (Score 1) 573

by crossword.bob (#40312993) Attached to: Apple Yanks Toddler's Speech-Enabling App

Apple is better than Android in terms of backwards compatibility.

Really? In the update from Android Honeycomb to ICS, I had a grand total of one app that had a problem. Every minor version update for iOS has killed at least two or three things for me, some of which are never actually fixed by their vendors.

...and your sample size of one user proves what, exactly?

Comment: Re:Worrying state of affairs (Score 3, Interesting) 374

by crossword.bob (#38659286) Attached to: Raspberry Pi Has Gone To Manufacturing

And then the taxing part is plain and simply dumb. You can't control corporations, but that the government actively deters local production? That's like shooting yourself in the foot and wondering why it hurts.

It's likely a throwback to a (failed) attempt to bolster UK component manufacture that's now backfiring on us.

Comment: Re:Not (primarily) about round-rects (Score 1) 313

by crossword.bob (#37760768) Attached to: Samsung Vs. Apple Tit-For-Tat Down Under

What a lot of people are missing (wilfully in many cases, I suspect) is that Apple aren't claiming any single element of their design, but the amalgamation of most or all aspects of it. They do not claim to own a shape, and there are any number of practical tablet designs incorporating rounded rectangles that Apple would make no claim to.

Comment: Re:Yes. (Score 1) 737

by crossword.bob (#37605716) Attached to: Should Science Be King In Politics?

For the love of all that is sensible, you are maddeningly stupid.

No, you're just massively missing the point. That's your problem, not mine. As is your insistence on acting like a twat while you do it. The point is that science routinely produces non-intuitive results. Historically, innumerable dead-ends have been hit by those tripping over incorrect assumptions based on intuition. And no, science does not advance common sense. It advances learning. Common sense—i.e. that which is common to all—is independent of learning. It is what is all too often cited by those who are ignorant of the salient facts when trying to advance their agendas and beliefs, and what I am saying is that we'd be better off ignoring common sense in favour of actual facts.

That said, some comments on the rest of your response:

An apple will, in fact, fall faster than a leaf from the height of a tree (which is a pretty fucking short distance). See previous.

Sigh. But not because (and solely because) it's heavier. A grain of sand will likely fall faster than a leaf. A cannonball will likely fall at more-or-less the same rate as a pebble. Yet these facts were overlooked for centuries because common sense told us heavier == faster.

And on and on... there is a difference between common sense and religious asshattery. Stop ascribing the results of the latter to the former.

Sorry, but you've got it bass-ackwards. Where did the asshattery come from? Common sense explained the world as it saw it, in terms of gods and monsters, and it took a series of extraordinary people to reveal the less intuitive but more correct truth, with common sense advocates fighting them at every turn.

Comment: Re:Yes. (Score 1) 737

by crossword.bob (#37602514) Attached to: Should Science Be King In Politics?

Wow - you really had to stretch to prove me wrong. And yet you failed nonetheless.

Common sense is what told people the world is flat

Uhm no, what told people the world was flat was a limited perceptive distance beyond which "nobody had ever gone." The Greeks had posited the idea of a round earth as early as the 6th century BC, worked out through observations of polar star movement and altitude differences.

So what; mankind's been around longer than 6th Century BC. And ideas worked out through observations of polar star movement and altitude differences can hardly be called "common sense".

heavy objects fall faster than light objects

Actually, in the resistance of air, "light" objects of sufficient area have a much lower terminal velocity than heavier objects. Thus they do, in fact, fall faster. The idea that gravity is acting on them differently is incorrect, but that's all.

Yes, I know that, I am not a moron. Nonetheless, until the experiments had been done, the notion that over short distances heavier objects would fall faster than light ones was widespread.

time is absolute and particles either go one way or another

For purposes of daily use, treating them as such simplifies the math while remaining useful. In detailed physics, no, but don't underestimate the idea of the useful approximation.

Again, so what? We now know (at least most of us do) that these are useful approximations. But when discovered, they ran counter to what was considered common sense. And to this day, do you really believe that the majority of humans on this planet are aware that they are merely useful approximations? I'll skip a few now...

Common sense tells ME that if it is valid, it can be scientifically tested

No, uncommon sense tells you that.

Common sense tells me also that people like you - who ascribe to "common sense" things that are demonstrably not - are buffoons.

Sorry, but you have not demonstrated that any of the above are not the product of "common sense". You've demonstrated that they are known to be wrong by people who have sufficient learning, but such people are applying that learning, not common sense.

I'd rather just believe that it's done by little elves running around.

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