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Comment: Re:Step 1: remove PulseAudio (Score 1) 244

by crimsun (#31346834) Attached to: Matt Asay Answers Your Questions About Ubuntu and Canonical

> step one is always to uninstall PulseAudio

Doing so really is a disservice to both PulseAudio and to Ubuntu, because it bugs in ALSA and in PA remain latent. That isn't a good thing. At this point, helping test daily-live desktop images of Ubuntu Lucid is really the direction one needs to pursue. If one were to remain with Karmic, please use PA from ppa:ubuntu-audio-dev instead, as it has all the necessary fixes from the stable-queue branch.

Comment: Re:A question from an ignoramus (Score 1) 244

by crimsun (#31346746) Attached to: Matt Asay Answers Your Questions About Ubuntu and Canonical

> direct me to the information required to make Ubuntu run well and stable,
> with a low latency kernel, and an external Pro-Audio sound card, without
> PulseAudio conflicting with Jack

If you wish to remain in the Ubuntu derivatives tree, it looks like Ubuntu Studio 10.04/Lucid is more aligned with your goals. You'll want to use an -rt kernel (at the very least -preempt, which is only available on amd64 currently). Unfortunately neither PA nor JACK have fully integrated handoffs via dbus (due to missing architectural decisions on both parts), so a conflict-free PA/JACK experience is still some time away.

Comment: Re:Very disappointed (Score 1) 244

by crimsun (#31346668) Attached to: Matt Asay Answers Your Questions About Ubuntu and Canonical

> Again, dismissive, and not the path to take, especially for the new guy.
> FIX THE SOUND! DUMP pulse! I've found that your own community has done
> what, you Cannoncial has not, UPDATED the ALSA drivers to CURRENT version
> to solve the problems with the prevalent "HDA" chipsets. GET THIS DONE.

Full disclosure: I am not a Canonical employee, but I spend a non-trivial amount of time maintaining audio in Ubuntu.

Because Ubuntu is heavily based on GNOME, and because GNOME has integrated PulseAudio quite tightly, removing PulseAudio from Ubuntu would be rather disastrous. Your argument has been heavily rehashed. Instead, desktop audio has already gained momentum in the PulseAudio direction, and it makes far more sense to help fix the bugs (which aren't even necessarily caused by PA -- see the libxml misuse debacles).

WRT updated drivers, it has been done: see what ppa:ubuntu-audio-dev offers in terms of linux-alsa-driver-modules-$(uname -r). Note that it is available for both Karmic and Lucid, and it is not from the official release tarball (currently 1.0.22.1) but from daily builds of git master HEAD corresponding to sound-2.6 (stable). Whatever's currently in the tree is rolled everyday.

Comment: Re:KDE summary: usable but not great. I'll pass. (Score 1) 744

by crimsun (#29910789) Attached to: Ubuntu 9.10 Officially Released

With very few exceptions, Kubuntu developers are volunteers and have the unenviable task of setting QA vice feature development priorities given their resource constraints. One way to encourage Kubuntu developers is to become one, and in that respect you, too, would contribute to fixing existing bugs instead of putting in new features.

Comment: Re:Yes, absolutely! (Score 1) 544

by crimsun (#25532395) Attached to: Is Ubuntu Getting Slower?

By default, 8.04's PulseAudio configuration uses a "nicer" but more resource-intensive resampler. Many people have simply turned off/deinstalled PulseAudio without really understanding the culprit.

By default, 8.10's PulseAudio configuration uses a less resource-intensive resampler (at the cost of some "quality"), so you shouldn't see the regression that you did from 7.10 -> 8.04.

The Almighty Buck

Apple Execs Reportedly Faked Options Documents 172

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the hands-in-the-cookie-jar dept.
theodp writes "Federal prosecutors are reportedly looking closely at stock option administration documents that were apparently falsified by Apple execs to maximize the profitability of option grants. While Apple has said CEO Steve Jobs did not profit from the stock-option backdating, Jobs has reportedly hired his own attorney to deal with the SEC and Justice Department."
OS X

+ - Worried about moving from Windows to Mac

Submitted by
Steve Ryan
Steve Ryan writes "The direction Microsoft are taking with Windows (for example, the DRM issues in Vista) have led me to believe Windows will soon be an OS which controls the user, rather than the other way round. I like XP, and I find it stable, but I do not want to upgrade to an OS (Vista) which is restrictive. This leaves me with either Linux or OS X. I like Linux, but it may not work with my laptop, so I don't really want to risk it. OS X seems nice. I spend most of my time writing documents and surfing the web, so it should handle everything I want, and I would be happy to buy a lovely MacBook Pro. But... will Apple follow Microsoft's lead and implement a DRM loving policy? If so, Mac is not an option.

End result? I'm confused. Help!"
Games

+ - How Sony learned from Microsoft's Mistakes

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "FiringSquad has just written an analysis of the PS3. What makes this unique is that they look at the PS3 using their article from last year describing the 11 design mistakes of the Xbox 360. It's interesting to see how accurate their predictions were re: Xbox 360, and to see how some of Sony's features directly address the problems faced by the Xbox360 launch. Surprisingly, they predict that the PS3 will come out on top. They argue that the "broken" programming model of the PS3 is bad, but that Polyphony Digital, Konami, and Square Enix are willing participants of Sony's religion of massively parallel architectures. That is, the Xbox 360 is designed to be developer-friendly, the PS3 is design to be friendly to Polyphony Digital, Konami, and Square-Enix. After all, Blu-Ray is useless unless you're the one developer who still uses a lot of pre-rendered cutscenes."
Announcements

+ - Daylight Savings Time will change in 2007

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "The Miami Herald writes in a Question and Answer column that there will be a change in daylight savings time, starting in 2007. The change is one of many being made as a result of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 in an attempt to conserve energy around the nation.

From the Wikipedia article: "The bill amends the Uniform Time Act of 1966 by changing the start and end dates of daylight saving time starting in 2007. Clocks will be set ahead one hour on the second Sunday of March instead of the current first Sunday of April. Clocks will be set back one hour on the first Sunday in November, rather than the last Sunday of October. This will make electronic clocks that had pre-programmed dates for adjusting to daylight saving time obsolete and will require updates to computer operating systems. The date for the end of daylight saving time has the effect of increasing evening light on Halloween (October 31)."

Microsoft has apparently already released an update for this daylight savings time change and will include the change in the up-and-coming OS, Windows Vista."
Privacy

+ - Government Spying

Submitted by
Richie
Richie writes "In 2001, President Bush issued a secret executive order authorizing warrantless electronic surveillance of people in the United States. In May 2006, the nation learned that the National Security Agency has been building a massive database of Americans' phone records. A federal judge has already ruled the warrantless wiretapping program unconstitutional. The Bush Administration claims that it has the inherent authority to continue it. On Jan 16th the New York Civil Liberties Union will be hosting a free Town Hall meeting to discuss warrantless wiretapping and the threat it poses to civil liberties. Learn how you can take action to stop unconstitutional NSA spying and protect your rights to privacy and freedom of speech."

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