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The Internet

+ - Startups unite to kill IE6 saving webdevelopers

Submitted by coffeeisclassy
coffeeisclassy (991791) writes "A collection of ycombinator companies have gotten together to finally kill IE6. Just how successful they will be is questionable, given that (for at least Digg) the majority of IE6 users can't change. The hope is, with increased pressure, IT departments may finally migrate away from the headache inducing browser which is IE6, allowing web-developers to focus on making things rather than supporting ancient browsers. Who knows, perhaps FireFox will gain some market share too :)"
Yahoo!

+ - Yahoo Filing Reveals Details Of Microsoft Deal->

Submitted by
CWmike
CWmike writes "Microsoft will pay Yahoo $50 million a year for three years and will hire at least 400 Yahoo employees as part of the companies' recent search agreement, according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Yahoo's form 8-K, which appeared online on Tuesday, reveals a few additional details about the agreement. The deal, announced last week, will mean that Microsoft's Bing search engine will power Yahoo's search site and Yahoo will sell premium search ad services for both companies. Five years into the 10-year agreement, Microsoft can opt out of the exclusive engagement for Yahoo's ad sales services, according to the filing. If it does, Yahoo will then keep 93 percent of the search revenue generated on sites owned and operated by Yahoo, instead of 88 percent. But Yahoo can also decide to remain the exclusive premium ad sales provider, in which case it will settle for an 83 percent share of the revenue. If Microsoft doesn't end the exclusive arrangement, Yahoo's share of the revenue will go up to 90 percent."
Link to Original Source
Google

+ - Google's 2nd Android Developer Contest kicksoff 1

Submitted by coffeeisclassy
coffeeisclassy (991791) writes "Google's second Android Developer Contest (ADC2) has started, despite some confusion around how to submit applications. The prizes are different from the first ADC, with each category having prizes of 100k, 50k, and 25k and an overall best of 150k,50k and 25k, meaning the best Android application from ADC2 is eligible for ~250k. The rules seem to allow any application never published before August 1st to compete and is open through the end of August (so break out your keyboards!). The top prizes are certainly less than that of first ADC, but with the prizes broken down by category Google may be hoping to inspire some love for less popular categories. While some other developers are waiting to find out to submit, one developer has moved ahead and released one of there entires Pigs Can Fly Site Monitor (also on Google Market for those with Androids). So if you've been waiting for an excuse to start a new side-project, here you have it :)"
Editorial

+ - Navigating a geek marriage...

Submitted by
JoeLinux
JoeLinux writes "I am soon to marry my true love (a girl! yes! they do exist!). She is a literary geek, whereas I am a gaming/linux geek. Being the RTFM-style geeks that we are, we have been reading up on marriage, making things work, etc. Unfortunately, all of the references seem to be based around an alpha-male jock, and a submissive cheerleader-style wife. A lot of the references to incompatibility in the books don't apply to us.(neglect due to interest in sports, etc.) What are some of the pitfalls and successes learned in the course of a more geek-oriented marriage?"
Cellphones

+ - Google's ADC2 kicks-off admit some confusion

Submitted by crazyirishhobo
crazyirishhobo (1130599) writes "Google's second Android Developer Contest (ADC2) has kicked off, despite some confusion around how to submit applications. While the rules and Google employees so far remain mum on the detail of how to submit applications to ADC2. The prise are different from the first ADC, with each (of 10) categories having prizes of 100k, 50k, and 25k and an overall best of 150k,50k and 25k, meaning the best Android application from ADC2 is eligible for ~250k. The rules seem to allow any application never published before August 1st to compete and is open through the end of August (so break out your keyboards!). The top prize is certainly less than for for the first ADC, but with the prizes broken down by category Google may be hoping to inspire some love for less popular categories. While some other developers are waiting to find out to submit, one developer has moved ahead and released one of there entires Pigs Can Fly Site Monitor (also on Google Market for those with Androids)."
Cellphones

+ - DeviceScape port to OpenMoko finished & availa

Submitted by crazyirishhobo
crazyirishhobo (1130599) writes "As slashdot reported awhile ago on the start of a port of device scape to the OpenMoko, the port is now been completed and is available for public download. However like other things in the OpenMoko community (including the phones), it appears that it has reached the end of the line, with the developer behind it apparently moving to the Android platform."
Google

+ - Vodafone pulls Google phone from NZ market->

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "After hyping the release of the HTC Magic on 26th June, Vodafone NZ appear to have pulled it from their shops and website. In an unrelated incident (they say) they've also asked for photos of a naked model painted with the Google logo to be removed from another website. Is Google so upset about having their logo on a naked woman that they've pulled the product, have Apple forced Vodafone NZ to remove the phone so they can keep their iPhone contract or is something else going on?"
Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - Your browser history is showing

Submitted by tiffanydanica
tiffanydanica (1347719) writes "For a lot of us our browser history is something we consider private, or at least not something we want to expose to every website we visit.Web2.0collage is showing just how easy it is (with code!)for sites to determine what sites you visit. When you visit the site it sniffs your browser history, and creates a collage of the (safe for work) sites that you visit. It is an interesting application of potentially scary technology (imagine a job application site using this to screen candidates). You can jump right into having your history sniffed if you so desire. While the collages are cool on their own merit, they also serve as an illustration of the privacy implications of browser history sniffing."
The Internet

+ - Automated collage of your browser history

Submitted by crazyirishhobo
crazyirishhobo (1130599) writes "Using browser history sniffing web2.0collage.com automatically determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. You can also jump over the warning and just start sniffing the history. Before you get too worried about what might be in the collage, it uses a list of safe-for-work sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about what blogs you read). The visual nature of the collage makes it easy to illustrate the potential privacy concerns of browser history sniffing. Other potential benign applications including customizing bookmarklets, but the less than benign (say advertising or even targeted phishing sites) applications are worrying."
Privacy

+ - Sniffing browser history for awareness & art

Submitted by tdalek
tdalek (990756) writes "web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and then creates a collage of them. While the collage is kind of nifty, it also graphically illustrates just how easy it is for people to sniff your browser history. Before you get too worried, it uses a white-list of SFW sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habits). However, just because these people play nice is no guarantee that everyone else will. Other potential benign applications including customizing bookmark-lets, but the less than benign (say advertising or even hr site) implications or troublesome. An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For slashdotters not interested in warnings or explanations, you can jump straight to the browser history sniffing"
The Internet

+ - Browser sniffing ninjas

Submitted by tasteyf00dninja
tasteyf00dninja (1327219) writes "web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning & explanation screen and go straight to the browser history sniffing this should do the trick. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing."
Security

+ - The art of browser history sniffing

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "There is a new kid in town doing something a bit different. web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning screen and go straight to the browser sniffing this should do the trick. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing."
Security

+ - Browser historry sniffing demoed by web2.0collage

Submitted by crazyirishhobo
crazyirishhobo (1130599) writes "Browser history sniffing isn't the newest thing on the block, but web2.0collage.com takes a different approach to browser history sniffing. Once it's gotten a list of all the sites you visit it constructs a (somewhat creepy) collage graphically illustrating the websites you visit. Depending on your browser history the results can be nifty or creepy (fortunately it does use a filtered SFW list). While the results on it own are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing."

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