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Comment Re:Because Reasons (Score 1) 368

Indeed, I've been looking at uMatrix (in combination with NoScript), and there's a lot to recommend it. As far as cookie management goes, however, it's not as fine-grained as what Firefox had. You can only enable/disable a site's ability to set cookies. You can't inspect/approve every single cookie request itself. Sometimes you can get a site to work by accepting certain cookies and denying all others. FF's facility let you do that.

Comment Re:Because Reasons (Score 1) 368

You're the third person in this sub-thread alone to recommend Self-Destructing Cookies.

While I like the idea of its behavioral detection of tracking cookies, and its stats panel is informative, my ultimate problem is that it allows the cookies to be set in the first place. 99.9% of the cookies shoved at my browser are entirely, provably unnecessary -- the page displays the same regardless. As such, my philosophy is that they should never be accepted in the first place, even temporarily.

The cookie request is also a waste of bandwidth. If you're going to display the same page either way, why clog the pipe with a cookie that you're manifestly not doing anything meaningful with?

Comment Because Reasons (Score 3, Interesting) 368

It occurred to me after submitting the article that the per-cookie approval feature has been part of Firefox since it was called Netscape, so it's been around for a very long time.

Moreover, the allegation that enabling the feature destabilized the browser is pharmaceutically pure bullshit. I've been using the feature since its inception, and have Firefox windows open and running for days at a time without ill effect.

Contrariwise, I just went to check my cookie store, and found a bunch of new, unapproved, unwelcome, provably unnecessary cookies have appeared in just the week since I moved from v43 to v44. Deleting them after the fact is not a solution. Once set, tracking can take place immediately. The damage has already been done.

The proffered reasons for the change are easily shown to be false, so I do not hold out any hope that Mozilla management will have a change of heart on this matter and reinstate the long-standing feature.

Would anyone care to recommend a cookie management add-on?

Submission + - Firefox 44 Deletes Fine-Grained Cookie Management (mozilla.org)

ewhac writes: Among its other desirable features, Firefox included a feature allowing very fine-grained cookie management. When enabled, every time a Web site asked to set a cookie, Firefox would raise a dialog containing information about the cookie requested, which you could then approve or deny. An "exception" list also allowed you to mark selected domains as "Always allow" or "Always deny", so that the dialog would not appear for frequently-visited sites. It was an excellent way to maintain close, custom control over which sites could set cookies, and which specific cookies they could set. It also helped easily identify poorly-coded sites that unnecessarily requested cookies for every single asset, or which would hit the browser with a "cookie storm" — hundreds of concurrent cookie requests.

Mozilla quietly deleted this feature from Firefox 44, with no functional equivalent put in its place. Further, users who had enabled the "Ask before accept" feature have had that preference silently changed to, "Accept normally." The proffered excuse for the removal was that the feature was unmaintained, and that its users were, "probably crashing multiple times a day as a result" (although no evidence was presented to support this assertion). Mozilla's apparent position is that users wishing fine-grained cookie control should be using a third-party add-on instead, and that an "Ask before accept" option was, "not really nice to use on today's Web."

Submission + - All 12 Countries Sign off on the TPP (freezenet.ca)

Dangerous_Minds writes: News is surfacing that the TPP has officially been signed by all 12 countries. This marks the beginning of the final step towards ratification. Freezenet has a quick rundown of what copyright provisions are contained in the agreement including traffic shaping, site blocking, enforcement of copyright when infringement is "imminent", and a government mandate for ISPs to install backdoors for the purpose of tracking copyright infringement on the Internet.

Comment Re:Solar Roadway Bull$it (Score 1) 405

Dave's argument starts with real-world numbers regarding solar insolation and PV conversion efficiency to establish a baseline. The exact details of a specific implementation won't change the broad conclusion that the energy balance alone, even if you take out the gee-whiz features of the Solar Freakin' Roadways design such as LEDs and networking, doesn't make sense.

When you add all the other stuff on top, it only gets worse.

Fundamental issues: Only so much sun hits the earth, and PV cells only convert a certain fraction to usable energy. When you mount them flat on the ground, you reduce their efficiency further because they're not perpendicular to the incoming light. When you put them under thick enough glass to support real physical loads such as cars and trucks, you lose even more. And when you distribute them over a large area, transmission losses become a Big Deal.

I'm personally skeptical you could build solar panels that would withstand actual vehicle traffic, at least the way we build roads here in the US. Real world roads aren't flat, and they change shape over time as they wear and as the road bed settles and degrades. But real world glass isn't very plastic, and won't conform to a changing surface. It's more likely to crack and break into many pieces. Likewise for the PV cells under it. You'd have to put some beefy steel plates under these to guarantee a sufficiently flat mounting surface to support the load-bearing glass.

Comment Re:Remember the NASA Wind Turbines? (Score 1) 178

Current blades are trucked in one piece (per blade) which is impressive to see. Three of them were parked on I-5 outside of Patterson, California a few months ago. There are a lot of net videos and photos which convey the scale.

Even at the current size they can't get through many highway interchanges and local intersections. The larger ones won't be able to ship in one piece at all.

Comment Remember the NASA Wind Turbines? (Score 4, Interesting) 178

NASA Wind Turbines approached this scale in the '80's. Unfortunately, this was a previously-unexplored area of aerodynamics for NASA, and they had mechanical stress and noise problems (including subsonics) and were all demolished. I think there was one near Vallejo, CA being taken down when I got to Pixar in '87, and one in Boone, NC, which famously rattled windows and doors.

The art has since improved. I took a ride to the top of the turbine at Grouse Mountain, that was fun! That's the only one I have heard of where you can actually get to see it from the top.

Comment Starting out with the wrong assumptions (Score 2) 165

This is starting out with the wrong assumptions.

Design a brick system that can be produced with 3-D printers, and will hold together when fabricated within the tolerances of an SLA printer. Forget FDM, it's too low precision and SLA is already achieving an equal or lower cost of manufacture compared with FDM.

LEGO is manufactured to astonishingly high precision, but I am not convinced that this is the only way to make a brick system.

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