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Submission + - Porsche chooses Apple over Google because Google wants too much data (theverge.com)

countach44 writes: As reported in number 5 of this list from Motor Trend, Porsche went with Apple over Google for the infotainment system in its new 911. Apparently, Android Auto wants vehicle data (throttle position, speed, coolant temp, etc...) whereas Apple Play only needs to know if the car is in motion. Speculation is around what Google, as a company building its own car, wants that data for.

Submission + - Pope says evolution doesn't mean there's no God (cnet.com) 1

SternisheFan writes: In an address to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, the Pope explains that God is not some sort of wizard.

by Chris Matyszczyk CNET @ChrisMatyszczyk October 27, 2014 10:56 AM PDT

The pope says evolution is valid, as long as God is the beginning.

Arguments around creation and evolution sometimes seem too similar to "Which came first? The chicken or the egg?"

Science and religion get placed on either side of a spectrum, with a section in the middle for those who'd like to hedge their bets.

On Monday, the pope outlined his belief with respect to God and evolution. Speaking to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Pope Francis insisted that there was no reason to believe that God and evolution were somehow incompatible.

It's just, he suggested, that God came first.

He said, according to Breitbart's translation: "Evolution requires the creation of beings that evolve." Though God is, he said, no wizard, he's still at the heart of all things, because he's the creator of all things.

The pope explained that God "created beings and let them develop in accordance with the internal laws that He has given to each one, so that they could arrive at their fulfillment," according to the translation.

The pope's views differ radically from those of some eminent scientists, such as Stephen Hawking. Hawking recently made it clear that he dismisses the idea of God. He said: "Before we understand science, it is natural to believe that God created the universe. But now science offers a more convincing explanation."

Submission + - GIMP Abandons SourceForge. Distributes via FTP Instead (gimp.org)

Dangerous_Minds writes: GIMP, a free and open source altenernative to image manipulation software like Photoshop, recently announced that it will no longer be distributing their program through SourceForge. Citing some of the ads as reasons, they say that the tipping point was "the introduction of their own SourceForge Installer software, which bundles third-party offers with Free Software packages. We do not want to support this kind of behavior, and have thus decided to abandon SourceForge." The policy changes were reported back in August by Gluster. GIMP is now distributing their software via their own FTP page instead. Is Sourceforge becoming the next CNET?

Submission + - Drones to deliver parcels in Australia (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: Australian startup Flirtey from March next year will offer parcel delivery for Australian businesses using automated aerial drones. From March, a partnership with a textook rental company will see drones delivering books to students.It will be the first use of fully automated commercial drones in the world, the companies said. Delivery by drone will be free for the receiver and will send parcels directly to an outdoor location of the user’s choice, with the drone’s GPS coordinates provided to the user through a smartphone app.

Submission + - DOJ: If we can track one American, we can track all Americans (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Seven months after his conviction, Basaaly Moalin’s defense attorney moved for a new trial (PDF), arguing that evidence collected about him under the government’s recently disclosed dragnet telephone surveillance program violated his constitutional and statutory rights. Moalin’s is the only thwarted "terrorist plot" against America that the government says also "critically" relied on the National Security Agency phone surveillance program, conducted under Section 215 of the Patriot Act.

The government’s response (PDF), filed on September 30th, is a heavily redacted opposition arguing that when law enforcement can monitor one person’s information without a warrant, it can monitor everyone’s information, “regardless of the collection’s expanse.” Notably, the government is also arguing that no one other than the company that provided the information—including the defendant in this case—has the right to challenge this disclosure in court.

Submission + - Asian Giant Hornets Kill 42 People in China, Injure over 1,500

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Madison Park and Dayu Zhang report on CNN that swarms of aggressive hornets are inflicting a deadly toll in a central China killing 42 people and injuring 1,675 people in three cities in Shaanxi province since July. Government authorities say these attacks are from a particularly venomous species, the world's largest hornet, known as the Asian giant hornet or vespa mandarinia. The giant hornet extends about 3.5 to 3.9 centimeters in length, roughly the size of a human thumb and has an orange head with a black tooth used for burrowing. The Asian giant hornet is intensely predatory; it hunts medium- to large-sized insects, such as bees, other hornet species, and mantises. The pain of the Asian Giant Hornet is described as a hot nail piercing the skin and lasts about 4 hours with instant swelling. One victim told local media earlier this month that "the more you run, the more they want to chase you." Some victims described being chased about 200 meters (656 feet) by a swarm. Local authorities have deployed thousands of police officers and locals to destroy about 710 hives but ""It's very difficult to prevent the attacks because hornet nests are usually in hidden sites," says Shunichi Makino, director general of the Hokkaido Research Center for Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute. Makino, who specializes in entomology, warned that the sting from an Asian giant hornet was severe compared with those of other insects. "The venom of an Asian giant hornet is very special compared with other hornets or yellow jackets," says Makino. "The neurotoxin — especially to mammals including humans — it's a special brand of venom." Asian Giant Hornets have been spotted in the United States.

Submission + - Major Data Brokers hacked by ID Theft Service

gewalker writes: Have we reached the point where it is time to admit that the ID thieves are winning and will continue to win as long as their incentives are sufficient to make it lucrative for them? According to Krebs On Security a breach in 25 data brokers has been identified including the heavyweights Dun and Bradstreet and LexusNexus. The truly telling quote is

“We could well be witnessing the death of knowledge-based authentication, and it’s as it should be,” Litan said. “The problem is that right now there are no good alternatives that are as easy to implement. There isn’t a good software-based alternative. Everybody in the industry knows that KBA is nearing its end of usefulness, but it’s not like you can instantly roll out biometric identifiers to the entire US population. We’re just not there yet. It’s years away. If ever.”

Submission + - Vietnamese Father and Son Found Living in a Treehouse for 40 Years (telegraph.co.uk)

jones_supa writes: A father and son who fled their village during the Vietnam War 40 years ago have apparently been discovered living in a treehouse deep in the jungle. They wore loincloths made of bark and used a homemade axe to chop down trees for firewood. They fed on corn that they had grown, plus fruits and cassava roots from the jungle. Inside their treehouse home, five metres in the air, the pair kept a stash of arrows for hunting and knives for killing animals. After they were returned back to rest of civilization by travelers, they had almost completely lost the ability to speak a language. The Vietnamese district authorities have confirmed that the father Ho Van Thanh once lived a normal life with his family in the commune’s Tra Kem hamlet. They suggested that he was probably driven by shock when he took his young son and ran into the jungle after the mine explosion wiped out the rest of their family.

Submission + - Global warming? No, actually we're cooling, claim scientists (telegraph.co.uk) 1

bricko writes: Global warming? No, actually we're cooling, claim scientists
A cold Arctic summer has led to a record increase in the ice cap, leading experts to predict a period of global cooling.

  There has been a 60 per cent increase in the amount of ocean covered with ice compared to this time last year, they equivalent of almost a million square miles.

In a rebound from 2012's record low an unbroken ice sheet more than half the size of Europe already stretches from the Canadian islands to Russia's northern shores, days before the annual re-freeze is even set to begin.

The Northwest Passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific has remained blocked by pack-ice all year, forcing some ships to change their routes.

A leaked report to the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) seen by the Mail on Sunday, has led some scientists to claim that the world is heading for a period of cooling that will not end until the middle of this century.

Submission + - MIT's inflatable antennae could boost small satellite communications (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: Researchers at the Massachusetts's Institute of technology say they have developed an inflatable antenna for small satellites known as cubesats that can fold into a compact space and inflate when in orbit. The inflatable antenna lets a CubeSat transmit data back to Earth at a distance that can be covered by a satellite outfitted with an inflatable antenna is seven times farther than that of existing CubeSat communications

Submission + - Top Factor In Successful IT Projects: Speed (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: There's a new trend in CIO circles: The need for speed. Whether they achieve that speed by adopting Agile development, cloud computing, or predictive analytics, the fact is that, increasingly, the only way for IT to deliver business advantage is to be faster than the competition. Or maybe it's just that IT is finally realizing that in business it's better to be fast than to be perfect. As my piano teacher used to say, 'if you can't play it right, play it loud.'

Submission + - New Ship Will Remain Stable by Creating its Own Inner Waves (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: When offshore oil drilling rigs are being installed, serviced or dismantled, the workers typically stay in cabins located on adjacent floating platforms. These semi-submersible platforms are towed into place (or travel under their own power) and then their hulls are partially filled with water, allowing them to remain somewhat stable in the pitching seas. Now, a ship is being built to serve the same purpose, but that will be a much more mobile alternative. It will keep from rolling with the waves by generating its own waves, inside its hull.

Submission + - HIV vaccine makers predict eradication of AIDS after successful trials (communications.uwo.ca)

An anonymous reader writes: The Phase 1 clinical trial of the SAV001-H HIV vaccine has shown great promise. Sumagen Canada Inc and the University of Western Ontario have reported that the trial is now complete, with volunteers showing no adverse effect from their course of SAV001-H and recording boosts in the production of antibodies. The increase of antibodies is seen as especially encouraging as a predicate for the likely success of Phase 2, which will focus on immune response. Sumagen CEO Mr Jung-Gee Cho expects the progress will see the company be the first to hit the market with an HIV vaccine, and predicts they will, in time, eradicate HIV/AIDS altogethe http://now.msn.com/hiv-vaccine-trial-subjects-experience-no-adverse-effects

Submission + - Steadicam-Like Liftware Spoon Cancels Out Parkinson's-Caused Tremors (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: While most of us take the lifting of a spoon to our mouth for granted, it can be a major challenge for people with Parkinson's Disease or other neurodegenerative conditions. It was with those people in mind that the engineers at San Francisco’s Lift Labs created the tremor-canceling Liftware Spoon.

Submission + - Japanese Ice Wall to Stop Radio Active Leaks. (denverpost.com)

minstrelmike writes: Japan is planning to install a 2 mile around the Fukushima nuclear plant. The technology has not been used to that extent nor for more than a couple years. "Plus the frozen wall won't be ready for another two years, which means contaminated water would continue to leak out." But at least they have a $470 million dollar plan ready to present to the Olympic committee choosing Madrid, Istanbul or Tokyo.

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