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Comment: Re:Uh, yeah! (Score 1) 426

by cosmocain (#26883815) Attached to: Facebook's New Terms of Service
i won't argue - i never stated that they are allowed to do ANYthing. But still they are seeking whays to maximize profit - as long as this doesn't collide with local laws. This is a more specific case of what i wrote not a falsification.

I'm almost too sure that facebook has a set of lawyers who evaluated if the ToS do collide with any laws in the US - and obviously they came to the conclusion that they are allowed to do what they are doing.

Comment: Re:FOXP2 (Score 2, Informative) 229

by cosmocain (#26841253) Attached to: Scientists Map Neanderthal Genome
Nah.

FOXP2 is responsible for "language development" with songbirds and other animals(*), too. If your logic would be correct, birds would talk like humans - which they obviously don't. (*)

The FOXP2 protein sequence is highly conserved. Similar FOXP2 proteins can be found in songbirds, fish, and reptiles such as alligators.

see here

Microsoft

Windows 7 To Be Called ... Windows 7 772

Posted by timothy
from the but-most-folks-call-me-jim dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft's Mike Nash came forward today in a blog post on the Windows Vista Blog and revealed the official name for Windows Code Name '7' as simply 'Windows 7.' The reasoning, by Mr. Nash, is that Windows 7 is 'the seventh release of Windows.' As much wonderful sense as this makes on first glance, it seems as if Microsoft's marketing teams pulled this number out of thin air: the Windows 7 kernel is version 6.1, and there's no way Windows 7 adds up as the seventh release of Windows anyway."
Space

The Quietest Sun 227

Posted by kdawson
from the storms-a-comin' dept.
Orbity sends in a Boston Globe report on the unusual calm on the surface of the sun. The photos, many taken in more active solar times, are excellent — see the sequence from last year of a coronal mass ejection carrying away the tail of a comet. "The Sun is now in the quietest phase of its 11-year activity cycle, the solar minimum — in fact, it has been unusually quiet this year — with over 200 days so far with no observed sunspots. The solar wind has also dropped to its lowest levels in 50 years. Scientists are unsure of the significance of this unusual calm..." As if to be contrary, New Scientist mentions that the number of sunspots seem to be increasing.
Operating Systems

+ - Is Linux out of touch with the average user?

Submitted by MrSmith
MrSmith (666) writes "Is Linux's less than impressive market share an indication that the movement is out of touch with the average computer user? ZDNet examines five reasons that could explain why people are still winning to pay (or pirate) an operating system when free alternatives exist. One of the reasons seems to be that despite what many Linux advocates claim, Windows users aren't on the whole dissatisfied with their OS:
'Despite what you read on websites and blogs, newspapers and magazines, people on the whole aren't all that dissatisfied with Windows. There are millions of users out there who just get on and use their PCs without any real difficulty.'"
Spam

+ - FTC sells national do not call list to spammers?

Submitted by
Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward writes "About three years ago I signed up for the national do not call list at https://www.donotcall.gov/ using a sneakemail.com address that was unique for that site and never given to any other site. (Note how the link on the registration page which states "Learn why your email address is required" is a broken link, yes, very nice.) But they have a privacy statement at http://www.ftc.gov/ftc/privacy.htm which specifically states "We will not share your email address with telemarketers". However this morning I just got an e-mail from matchmaker.com that came in through that address. Does this not seem like the exact opposite of the purpose of a do not call list?"
Bug

Journal: OpenBSD's second remote hole in the default installation

Journal by Alioth

The OpenBSD project has just issued an advisory (and updated its website to reflect the change) that it now has its second remote root vulnerability in more than ten years. The exploit itself is performed with a specially crafted IPv6 ICMP packet, and is caused by a bug in the mbuf chains in the operating system kernel. The OpenBSD team have released a patch. The bug affects all versions of OpenBSD. Since

Those who do not understand Unix are condemned to reinvent it, poorly. - Henry Spencer, University of Toronto Unix hack

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