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Submission + - Albright: There's a place in Hell for women who don't help one another (

coondoggie writes: "Speaking at the CIA Women's History Month Celebration this week former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright offered a number of career advancing suggestions for women in the workforce. Albright said her storied career — which really began at age 39 after raising three children and obtaining her Ph.D. — owes its success to making the most of opportunities presented. "I never imagined that I would one day become secretary of state," she said. "It's not that I lacked ambition. It is just that I had never seen a secretary of state in a skirt.""

Submission + - Air Force exploring systems that safeguard spacecraft network security (

coondoggie writes: "How are all manner of spacecraft development from the space parts supply chain to actual space operations protected from those who would try to penetrate or disrupt the networks involved in that process?

The US Air Force Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has put out a call for research to understand that security scenario stating that "we are much less concerned about information on the broader themes of cyber-security but rather those that pertain to the mission of the spacecraft, the spacecraft as a platform, the systems that constitute the spacecraft, the computers and their software, the busses and networks within, and the elements that interface to the spacecraft..."


Submission + - Hugely popular FBI UFO file stirred controversy but proved nothing (

coondoggie writes: "Perhaps it's because there has been a steady stream of news about asteroids flying by or hitting Earth in or maybe it's the uptick in space news having to do with Mars and the Sun in recent months, but whatever the reason the FBI this week decided to chat up its famous or infamous UFO memo written by agent Guy Hottel 63 years ago. The single page file, which the FBI now says it is the agency's most viewed document — having been hit nearly one million times since its declassification in 2011 — relays an unconfirmed UFO report that the FBI says it never even followed up on."

Submission + - DARPA wants unique automated tools to rapidly make computers smarter (

coondoggie writes: "Researchers at DARPA want to take the science of machine learning — teaching computers to automatically understand data, manage results and surmise insights — up a couple notches. Machine learning, DARPA says, is already a the heart of many cutting edge technologies today, like email spam filters, smartphone personal assistants and self-driving cars. "Unfortunately, even as the demand for these capabilities is accelerating, every new application requires a Herculean effort. Even a team of specially-trained machine learning experts makes only painfully slow progress due to the lack of tools to build these systems," DARPA says."

Submission + - Laser pointers produce too much energy, pose risks for the careless (

coondoggie writes: "Commercial grade green and red laser pointers emit energy far beyond what is safe, posing skin, eye and fire hazards. That was the conclusion of a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) study on the properties of handheld laser devices that tested 122 of the devices and found that nearly 90% of green pointers and about 44% of red pointers tested were out of federal safety regulation compliance."

Submission + - The hot art in the CIA's cool art collection (

coondoggie writes: "Works of fine art aren’t likely what you’d expect to find at the CIA but the agency has 16 "intelligence-themed artworks" hanging in a prominent hallway at its headquarters. The paintings in the CIA’s Intelligence Art Gallery represent institutional pride and historic record, the agency says. Here we take a look at some of them which feature military action, significant aircraft and other spy-worthy works of art."

Submission + - FTC dumps on scammers who blasted millions of text messages ( 1

coondoggie writes: "The Federal Trade Commission today said it has filed eight court cases to stop companies who have sent over 180 million illegal or deceptive text messages to all manner of mobile users in the past year. The messages — of which the FTC said it had received some 20,000 complaints in 2012 — promised consumers free gifts or prizes, including gift cards worth $1,000 to major retailers such as Best Buy, Walmart and Target."

Submission + - Hockey sticks, pocket knives and billiard cues among carry-on items TSA will soo (

coondoggie writes: "As of April 25th the Transportation Security Administration will let a bunch of previously prohibited items such as small pocket knives and what it calls "novelty" or toy bats to be taken on aircraft as carry-ons. The idea the agency said was to let Transportation Security Officers better focus their efforts on spot higher threat items such as explosives and guns."

Submission + - Carnegie Mellon gets $6M for secure software to protect vehicles from hackers (

coondoggie writes: Keeping hacker cyber-nastiness away from manned or unmanned ground vehicles is the idea behind a 4.5-year, $6 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to Carnegie Mellon University. The project is part of DARPA’s High-Assurance Cyber Military System (HACMS) program launched last year to produce ultra secure software systems to protect important networked assetsfrom hacks, attacks or other cyber-disruptions.

Submission + - Artificial aurora lights-up arctic skies (

coondoggie writes: "It did not light up the sky like real aurora borealis can but researchers with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory said they have created an artificial version that can be used to explore ionospheric occurrences and their impact on communications, navigation and space weather. Specifically what the researchers did was produce what they called a "sustained high density plasma cloud in Earth's upper atmosphere," using the 3.6-megawatt High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) transmitter facility, Gakona, Alaska."

Submission + - Emoticon-based "Moby Dick"gets into the US Library of Congress (

coondoggie writes: "The US Library of Congress welcomed Moby Dick onto its vaunted shelves this week but it wasn't the famous Herman Melville-penned whale tale version oh no, it was the version told exclusively in emoticon — you know those little signs like :), ;). Emoji are the emoticons typically used in Japanese texting though they obviously are used world-wide to annoy or entertain everyone depending on your opinion of them."

Submission + - Drones still face major communications challenges getting onto US airspace (

coondoggie writes: "Communications and effective system control are still big challenges unmanned aircraft developers are facing if they want unfettered access to US airspace. Those were just a couple of the conclusions described in a recent Government Accountability Office report on the status of unmanned aircraft and the national airspace. The bottom line for now seems to be that while research and development efforts are under way to mitigate obstacles to safe and routine integration of unmanned aircraft into the national airspace, these efforts cannot be completed and validated without safety, reliability, and performance standards, which have not yet been developed because of data limitations"

Submission + - Earth-buzzing asteroid could be worth big bucks: $195B if we could catch it (

coondoggie writes: "The asteroid NASA say is about the half the size of a football field that will blow past Earth on Feb 15 could be worth up to $195 billion in metals and propellant. That's what the scientists at Deep Space Industries, a company that wants to mine these flashing hunks of space materials, thinks the asteroid known as 2012 DA14 is worth — if they could catch it."

Submission + - Feds offer $20M for critical open source energy network cybersecurity tools ( 1

coondoggie writes: "The US Department of Energy today said it would spend $20 million on the development of advanced cybersecurity tools to help protect the nation's vulnerable energy supply. The DOE technologies developed under this program should be interoperable, scalable, cost-effective advanced tools that do not impede critical energy delivery functions, that are innovative and can easily be commercialized or made available through open source for no cost."

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