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Medicine

Sticky Tape Found To Emit Terahertz Radiation 96

Posted by timothy
from the turn-up-your-sensors dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from New Scientist "'Peeling sticky tape has already been shown to produce X-rays, so Joseph Horvat and Roger Lewis of the University of Wollongong in New South Wales, Australia, tried to see if it could create lower-frequency terahertz radiation. "We were rather pleasantly surprised to obtain a clear signal in our first attempt," says Horvat. Strongly adhesive Scotch Magic 810 tape and weakly adhesive electrical tape both yielded strong terahertz signals, ranging from 0.1 to 10 terahertz, but only about a microwatt of power, too little for practical use (Optics Letters, vol 34, p 2195). Horvat says that refinements should increase the power by orders of magnitude.' It may be old news to Slashdot that [peeling clear tape] had been proved to produce X-rays, but watching the linked video where they use tape to expose X-ray film was pretty amazing."

Comment: Re:Largely irrelevant to RIAA litigation (Score 1) 436

by converter (#28629423) Attached to: Judge Rules IP Addresses Not "Personally Identifiable"

The legal system isn't intended for "getting away with shit", it's intended for making the prosecution prove, beyond a reasonable shadow of a doubt, that the defendant actually committed the act or acts they're being accused of. If someone ends up getting away with something, it's entirely the fault of the prosecution for not gathering enough evidence to have an airtight case.

This is true in a criminal trial, but not in a civil one. In a civil proceeding there is no defendant, and as Grond stated above (and others have stated elsewhere) you only have to show that the person being sued is most likely the person who caused the damage you are suing over.

Comment: the term "katrina-like" makes me angry... (Score 5, Interesting) 356

by converter (#26417335) Attached to: Is a 'Katrina-Like' Space Storm Brewing?
It really, really bugs me. A lot. I know they are only using it to give the impression of a powerful and disastrous storm. It just seems that likening a coronal mass ejection to a "katrina-like" event is as realistic as likening a tornado to that little swirl in your bathtub drain.
Image

The Smell of Space 70

Posted by samzenpus
from the excuse-me-while-I-smell-the-sky dept.
According to NASA scientists, space smells a lot like my uncle's workshop. One can detect hints of fried steak, hot metal, and the welding of a motorbike. They have hired Steven Pearce, a chemist and managing director of fragrance manufacturing company Omega Ingredients, to recreate the smell in a laboratory. NASA will use his research to help train potential astronauts. Steven said, "I did some work for an art exhibition in July, which was based entirely on smell, and one of the things I created was the smell of the inside of the Mir space station. NASA heard about it and contacted me to see if I could help them recreate the smell of space to help their astronauts."
Space

Colliding Galaxies Reveal Colossal Black Holes 134

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the duck-and-cover dept.
Matt_dk writes "New observations made with the Submillimeter Array of telescopes in Hawaii suggest that black holes — thought to exist in many, if not all, galaxies — were common even in the early Universe, when galaxies were just beginning to form. Astronomers have found two very different galaxies in the distant Universe, both with colossal black holes at their hearts, involved in a spectacular collision."
Privacy

FBI and Next-Gen P2P Monitoring 122

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the big-brother-wants-to-give-you-a-hug dept.
AHuxley writes "Can the FBI get funding to create a next-generation network monitoring and database system for P2P networks, web sites, and chat rooms? Could the FBI's Regional Information Sharing Systems (RISS) network be opened to more law enforcement agents across the USA? Will the tracking of p2p users via 'unique serial numbers' generated from a person's computer be expanded from its first use in late 2005? Is your p2p application or plug-in sending back your MAC address, firmware revision, manufacture date, GUID or other details?" Could this story submitter pose any more questions in his submission? Won't someone please think of the ... oh, never mind.
Book Reviews

Linux Firewalls 91

Posted by samzenpus
from the protect-ya-neck dept.
David Martinjak writes "Linux Firewalls, authored by Michael Rash and published by No Starch Press, covers five main topics: traditional packet filtering with iptables, port scan detection, snort rule translation, port knocking, and log visualization. At first I considered only skimming the chapters regarding iptables packet filtering. I have a good amount of experience with iptables, and have been running it for several years. Thankfully I decided to give the first chapter a good read. Right from the start, the book presented valuable information and pulled me in." Read on for the rest of David's review.
AMD

+ - AMD To Develop "Open-Source Friendly" GPUs->

Submitted by skaroo
skaroo (666) writes "Phoronix is reporting that future AMD GPUs will be more open-source friendly. After AMD started releasing their GPG specifications to the open-source community, questions arose whether there would be information covering their Unified Video Decoder (UVD) found on the Radeon HD 2000 graphics cards. The UVD information is needed in order for hardware-accelerated video playback, but it likely cannot be opened as it's ingrained with DRM. However, an AMD representative said that moving to a modular UVD design is a requirement for future GPUs and that they will be more open-source friendly. They will also be opening the video acceleration information for their earlier graphics cards. A win for the open-source community or too little too late?"
Link to Original Source
Music

+ - RIAA Insanity-Suing People For Ripping CD's They P-> 2

Submitted by
mrneutron2003
mrneutron2003 writes "With this past weeks announcement by Warner to release its entire catalog to Amazon in MP3 format with no Digital Rights Management, you would think that the organization that represents them, The Recording Industry Association of America , would begin changing its tune. However in an inane display of hubris and futility, the RIAA presses on in it's tirade against the very consumers its partners rely on buy (we're not making this up) suing individuals who merely rip CD's they've purchased legally.

The Washington Post reports on the case being fought by a Scottsdale Arizona man, Jeffrey Howell, who is being taken to task for ripping his own store bought CD's to his PC as a violation of copyright.

Now, in an unusual case in which an Arizona recipient of an RIAA letter has fought back in court rather than write a check to avoid hefty legal fees, the industry is taking its argument against music sharing one step further: In legal documents in its federal case against Jeffrey Howell, a Scottsdale, Ariz., man who kept a collection of about 2,000 music recordings on his personal computer, the industry maintains that it is illegal for someone who has legally purchased a CD to transfer that music into his computer.
If the RIAA is successful here, it is safe to say that the overwhelming majority of American music consumers will soon be classified as criminals under the law for attempting to use media they've legally purchased in a manner they desire.
http://www.fastsilicon.com/off-the-wall/riaa-insanity-suing-people-for-ripping-cds-they-purchased.html"

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Under Existing Noise Laws (Score 1) 396

by converter (#21712536) Attached to: Beamed Sonic Advertising Is Coming
the noise ordinance in the city in which i live dictates a specific range in feet from the source that a noise can be heard before it is considered to be in violation. i'm sure it varies widely by jurisdiction in both the metrics for determining what noises violate the local laws and what the penalties are for violations.

"It's like deja vu all over again." -- Yogi Berra

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