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Comment: Re:Not really missing vinyl (Score 1) 433

by confused one (#48596307) Attached to: Vinyl Record Pressing Plants Struggle To Keep Up With Demand
No. The "warmth" he's referring to had more to do with the way a needle tracked the groove, the way a tube amp interacts with the speakers (damping and harmonics), and the way a guitar amp that uses tubes rolls off instead of clipping. All is not a bed of roses in analog land... Us old guys grew up with this stuff and remember it as "the way music is supposed to sound". Digital's not the panacea it's made out to be either... overcompression, lossy recordings and poor reproduction from most modern releases leaves something to be desired. You young guys have been trained to ignore all the high frequency digital artifacts that bug the crap out of some of us.

Comment: Re:obviously they should track the sun (Score 2) 327

by confused one (#48512463) Attached to: You're Doing It All Wrong: Solar Panels Should Face West, Not South
I should have made something more clear: the insurance and liability risk is a key factor... If I sell an item that breaks and damages a house in a storm, and the insurance refuses to cover the item and the house... Especially if the house would have normally survived the storm without my system being installed... Then I'm looking at a lawsuit (from either the homeowner, the insurer, or a government agency). So, basically, it's not at all in my best interest, nor is it ethical, to sell you something that's not going to meet the minimum wind rating -- even if that's "Hurricane Rated Z3.4 and 80 mph winds". I just won't put the product on the market knowing I'm going to eventually be sued.

Comment: Re:obviously they should track the sun (Score 3, Interesting) 327

by confused one (#48512425) Attached to: You're Doing It All Wrong: Solar Panels Should Face West, Not South
One of the problems is it has to be rated for high winds; or, you're not going to be able to insure your house if it's mounted on the roof. OK, you might be able to insure it but they might void the coverage if you get wind damage that can be attributed to the panels. Accuracy really only needs to be a +/- a couple of degrees for PV. Hell, most people mount them flat to the roof, which is not pitched anywhere near ideal. some of the larger synchronous motors probably do have enough torque to push over a single panel; and, you can build a cam driven system that tilts the panels in a cyclic fashion. Problem is, if the power ever goes out it's going to be hell to reset all of them. Theoretically, you could use a system that relies on the Sun to heat and expand a liquid, pushing the panels from a "morning" orientation to an "afternoon" orientation. In the end... You're still going to pay more than $200 for a structure with "motor" that's strong enough to do the job and well built enough to survive for 10 years on a rooftop. You could probably make it for a couple hundred dollars; but, you'll never buy it for cost -- you'll end up paying double that (at least) after manufacturer overhead (design and support) is rolled into the cost, and the distributor(s) and installer(s) mark up the price.

Comment: Re:obviously they should track the sun (Score 4, Interesting) 327

by confused one (#48512003) Attached to: You're Doing It All Wrong: Solar Panels Should Face West, Not South
Just a guess (from an engineer, so it's a sophisticated guess)... Might be $200 per panel because the motor has to be big enough to move the panel in prevailing winds; and, the structure has to be strong enough to keep the panel from being ripped off the roof during a storm. Again, just guessing.

You're already carrying the sphere!

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