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Comment: Yahoo Small Business (Score 1) 222

by colfer (#48631155) Attached to: Marissa Mayer's Reinvention of Yahoo! Stumbles

I'm guessing Yahoo Small Business is how they'd like to make money, but it's a bit of a legacy monster. Certainly very hard to get a customer out of and onto a different platform. Comcast Small Biz is similar confusing mess of intersecting control panels (maybe the same software?). A few other companies run the same game, getting business clients locked in complex setups, but I'm not sure it's even intentional with these players on the bottom end of the business hosting market.

On a similar note I called Network Solutions today to get a better domain renewal price, and the customer rep told me domain reg was no longer its main business and we should consider switching to another company if we did not want any other services. It's now Network Solutions,a "web-dot-com" company. They do still offer a $10 panic price though if you click for your transfer authorization code.

Comment: Re:Ebola vs HIV (Score 1) 381

by colfer (#48160137) Attached to: How Nigeria Stopped Ebola

As well, millions (literally I'm afraid) of Americans are terrified by hospitals because just going there will almost certainly result in involuntary bankruptcy. The CDC and political leaders are saying nothing about who pays if you follow public health guidelines and go for treatment or observation. They seem unaware of how people make these decisions, and even well-versed journalists have no idea how hospitals respond when patients cannot pay. For example, in http://washpost.bloomberg.com/... Bloomberg quotes a JHU professor saying "If they recognize that [Thomas Eric Duncan] has no money they will clearly just write it off as charity care." That is simply not true. Non-profit hospitals are by far the #1 parties putting people into involuntary bankruptcy.

The care for Thomas Eric Duncan, "patient zero" in Texas, in estimated in the same article as over $500,000 even before he died. Presumably, due to the publicity, that bill was never sent. But who knows.

Comment: Re:Attention Kmart shoppers (Score 2) 243

by colfer (#48082593) Attached to: 2014 Nobel Prize In Physics Awarded To the Inventors of the Blue LED

Mod up!

Solar cells are also diodes, they just work in reverse from LED's. Applying light creates a current, as opposed to a current creating light. All based on getting an electron state to jump from a semiconductor to another semiconductor that differs by one valence. The semiconductors in solar cells are two big discs, one on top of the other. (Experts please correct any of the preceding.)

Just like K-mart and Sears.

Comment: Re:No suprise... (Score 3, Insightful) 112

by colfer (#47938937) Attached to: An Open Source Pitfall? Mozilla Labs Closed, Quietly

Mozilla's resources are going to mobile. They don't want to be caught dead if the dominant platform really does changes from desktop to mobile. So it's all about the Firefox browser for phone, and FirefoxOS.

All this groaning about them spending resources on UI misses the point. You're just complaining about what you see! The real $ is not going to UI it's going to mobile, and to technical parity with Chrome.

Wonder if they feel the same way about Email - that it's dated technology! Some of the technical issues they left hanging when they took away all the paid developers are significant.

Comment: "the more items Amazon sells to Prime members..." (Score 1) 168

by colfer (#47530973) Attached to: Amazon's Ambitious Bets Pile Up, and Its Losses Swell

"The more items Amazon sells to Prime members, the more money it loses." What bookshops have been saying for a decade is that Amazon is selling books at a loss, which used to be illegal as anti-competitive monopoly activity.

Much better than the opaque NYT article linked is this December article from IBT: "Amazon: Nearly 20 Years In Business And It Still Doesn't Make Money, But Investors Don't Seem To Care" http://www.ibtimes.com/amazon-... It has the quote above, and the historic profit/loss graph I was looking for. Revenues have risen at a 45 degree angle, but profit/loss hovers around zero.

Comment: Re:so how is this different from Microsoft? (Score 1) 132

by colfer (#47305087) Attached to: Mozilla Introduces Browser-Based WebIDE

Read the article, they are targeting Firefox, Chrome and Safari as platforms. This is a development tool for some reason put into core.

And the "app" does have to be a web app because this is all about mobile. They will probably integrate submitting the app to the various vendor-approved marketplaces, starting with this one: https://marketplace.firefox.co...

I question all this, because Mozilla has limited resources, mainly from Google searches. But sticking with Desktop only would be risky.

Comment: Re:RIP firefox, lean and fast (Score 2) 132

by colfer (#47304539) Attached to: Mozilla Introduces Browser-Based WebIDE

That's long gone. The download (29MB for win32) is now larger than Seamonkey (20MB). At least half the development is focused on mobile and other projects. Thunderbird and Seamonkey have no paid developers. I assume the mobile products do have to be lean and fast though. That's been the big turnaround in browsers, back to small screens, low memory and slow chips!

As for desktop. Still a good browser, needs one process per tab. Still good to have a compliant rendering engine besides Chrome. Still good to have privacy and security policies competing with Chrome.

Comment: Re:Antitrust...? (Score 4, Insightful) 132

by colfer (#47304507) Attached to: Mozilla Introduces Browser-Based WebIDE

Not that.

Right now this protocol is useful for Firefox Desktop, Firefox Android, and Firefox OS. But we aren’t stopping there. We’re working on a protocol adapter that will allow clients using the Firefox Remote Debugging Protocol – including the Developer Tools and WebIDE – talk to all mobile browsers, regardless of rendering engine or runtime. Our first targets are Chrome for Android and Safari on iOS.

Comment: Re:Why so much stupid shit, Mozilla? (Score 2) 89

by colfer (#47289685) Attached to: Mozilla Is Working On a Firefox OS-powered Streaming Stick

TB has some architectural problems and the withdrawal of paid developers by Mozilla makes it unlikely they will be fixed. The problem I ran into is that attachments cannot easily be stored separately from messages. That column showing the attachment count is actually just a guess. The db does not have real info on the MIME situation in messages. All that work is done on the fly whenever you open the message. You can detach the attachments from messages and store them separately, but only by clicking on messages one-by-one. There is an extension that attempts to automate detachment through filters, but it will crash if it encounters too many messages with attachments at one time, since the task is asynch. I confirmed all this with the extension developer - not the crashes, but the architecture and the fact that the db only guesses at the attachment count when you view the message list. Of the 12,000 current extensions, I found two or three that attempted to deal with detachment.

Never tell people how to do things. Tell them WHAT to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity. -- Gen. George S. Patton, Jr.

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