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+ - "Mr. Sulu" George Takei Goes Racist: Justice Thomas 'a clown in blackface'->

An anonymous reader writes: The Washington Times reports, "Gay rights activist and former “Star Trek” star George Takei recently told a local Fox affiliate in Arizona that Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is a “clown in blackface.” Mr. Takei told a Phoenix station that the justice was “a disgrace to America” over his Obergefell v. Hodges dissent. The 5-4 ruling prohibits states from banning same-sex marriage. “Human dignity has long been understood in this country to be innate. When the Framers proclaimed in the Declaration of Independence that ‘all men are created equal’ and ‘endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights,’ they referred to a vision of mankind in which all humans are created in the image of God and therefore of inherent worth. That vision is the foundation upon which this Nation was built,” Justice Thomas wrote in his dissent ... "... The government cannot bestow dignity, and it cannot take it away,” the justice continued."
Link to Original Source

+ - What happens when it's suddenly illegal to move money out of your country?

schwit1 writes: Basic Internet services disappear.

Just as individual Greeks are losing access to Apple's iCloud, as the Athens staff of Bloomberg News recently discovered, so companies are finding themselves cut off from services critical to their ongoing operations.

The problem demonstrates a hidden risk in today's otherwise efficient vertical disintegration. Taking for granted the easy flow of money across borders, system designers never foresaw a situation in which companies with adequate funds would find that they couldn't pay foreign vendors.

"Greek companies are not able at this moment to pay for hosting (Amazon), storage (Dropbox), email services (MailChimp) and many other services," says Jon Vlachogiannis, a Bay Area entrepreneur, in an email. Without these services, otherwise viable businesses are in trouble.

Vlachogiannis and other expats are stepping up to pay the bills from California, rescuing companies with astonishingly small amounts.

+ - Paradoxical Crystal Baffles Physicists->

An anonymous reader writes: In a deceptively drab black crystal, physicists have stumbled upon a baffling behavior, one that appears to blur the line between the properties of metals, in which electrons flow freely, and those of insulators, in which electrons are effectively stuck in place. The crystal exhibits hallmarks of both simultaneously.

“This is a big shock,” said Suchitra Sebastian, a condensed matter physicist at the University of Cambridge whose findings appeared today in an advance online edition of the journal Science. Insulators and metals are essentially opposites, she said. “But somehow, it’s a material that’s both. It’s contrary to everything that we know.”

Link to Original Source

+ - Common medications sway moral judgment->

sciencehabit writes: How many times would you give your neighbor an electric shock to earn a few extra bucks? Your answer could be more malleable than you think. A new study finds that two common drugs—an antidepressant and a treatment for Parkinson’s disease—can influence moral decisions, a discovery that could help unravel specific mechanisms behind aggression and eventually help researchers design treatments for antisocial behavior.
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Really? (Score 1) 349 349

1941? 1944? I see it has escaped you that the discussion was of events circa 1953 , and that I am correct. I suggest that you go back and reread the thread starting with PopeRatzo's message. Other than having written about events in the wrong decade and on the wrong topic your post was a triumph.

Comment: Re:They are looking forward (Score 1) 349 349

Carry wounded and material for depot level repair to maintain the war effort?

It wasn't rail cars coming from the front that carried Jews to the extermination camps, but I trust you already knew that.. The Germans sacrificed some of their ability to supply their troops in order to kill more Jews. It was a vile hatred that came back to bite them. Maybe you should consider that.

Comment: Re:Really? (Score 1) 349 349

Based on your links it's true. From Wikipedia:

1953 Iranian coup d'état

A referendum to dissolve parliament and give the prime minister power to make law was submitted to voters, and it passed with 99.9 percent approval, 2,043,300 votes to 1300 votes against.[60] The referendum was widely seen by opponents as a dictatorial act, and the Shah and the rest of the government were effectively stripped of their powers to rule. When Mossadegh dissolved the Parliament, his opponents decried this act because he had effectively given himself "total power". Ironically, this seemingly un-democratic act by a democratically elected prime minister would result in a chain of events leading to his downfall.[6][8]

99.9% in a national election? That seems to be a bit much.

IRAN: 99.93% Pure

Hitler's best as a vote-getter was 99.81% Ja's in 1936; Stalin's peak was 99.73% Da's in 1946. Last week Premier Mohammed Mossadegh, the man in the iron cot, topped them all with 99.93%.

This is the way he did it. Having unconstitutionally dissolved the Majlis, Mossadegh ordered a national referendum to judge his act, crying: "The will of the people is above law."

The Shah was head of state both before and after the coup restoring him to power. The dictator Mossadegh had caused the Shah to flee the country after refusing the Shah's power as head of state to remove him as head of government.

Comment: Re:Respect has to be earned (Score 1) 349 349

Thanks for the links, saved me some trouble. From Wikipedia:

1953 Iranian coup d'état

A referendum to dissolve parliament and give the prime minister power to make law was submitted to voters, and it passed with 99.9 percent approval, 2,043,300 votes to 1300 votes against.[60] The referendum was widely seen by opponents as a dictatorial act, and the Shah and the rest of the government were effectively stripped of their powers to rule. When Mossadegh dissolved the Parliament, his opponents decried this act because he had effectively given himself "total power". Ironically, this seemingly un-democratic act by a democratically elected prime minister would result in a chain of events leading to his downfall.[6][8]

My goodness, 99.9% in a national election? This is extraordinary.

IRAN: 99.93% Pure

Hitler's best as a vote-getter was 99.81% Ja's in 1936; Stalin's peak was 99.73% Da's in 1946. Last week Premier Mohammed Mossadegh, the man in the iron cot, topped them all with 99.93%.

This is the way he did it. Having unconstitutionally dissolved the Majlis, Mossadegh ordered a national referendum to judge his act, crying: "The will of the people is above law."

Comment: Re:Respect has to be earned (Score 1) 349 349

Bollocks. The Iranian PM (and democratically elected government) ....

"democratically elected government" eh?

IRAN: 99.93% Pure

Hitler's best as a vote-getter was 99.81% Ja's in 1936; Stalin's peak was 99.73% Da's in 1946. Last week Premier Mohammed Mossadegh, the man in the iron cot, topped them all with 99.93%.

This is the way he did it. Having unconstitutionally dissolved the Majlis, Mossadegh ordered a national referendum to judge his act, crying: "The will of the people is above law."

That is a bit backwards before you get to the question of improbable election results.

A "Prime Minister" ruling by decree after dissolving parliament and then justifying it with a faked election isn't really much of a democracy, is it?

The Shah was head of state both before and after the coup restoring him to power. The dictator Mossadegh had caused the Shah to flee the country after refusing the Shah's power as head of state to remove him as head of government.

Why do you omit this history? Why pretend that the Shah only held power after he was restored to power and not before as well?

 

Comment: Re:Iran is not trying to save money (Score 1) 349 349

It's insane to think Iran would open up its military facilities for inspection. No country has ever willingly done that except those that have surrendered unconditionally after defeat in war (such as Imperial Japan). It would essentially mean Iran gives up its right to exist as an independent sovereign nation. . . .

. . . Those insisting that Iran open up its military sites are insisting on something they know Iran won't do so as to derail the deal. Their intentions are not sincere.

Do tell.

U.S. Missile Base Braces for Soviet Inspectors
SOVIET INF MONITORS COMPLETE FIRST U.S. INSPECTIONS

Have a great day Comrade.

Comment: Re:They are looking forward (Score 1) 349 349

Unlike ISIS, Iran is a country that has existed continuously for 2500 years.

The people of Persia have existed for thousands of years. The Islamic Republic of Iran has only existed for a few decades, and has fostered suicide bombings and Islamic revolution around the world.

I highly doubt they would self-immolate just for a chance to 'nuke the infidel.'

Much as Germany wouldn't self-immolate just for a chance to kill a few million Jews? Oddly enough there is another country so inclined to attempt that feat. Any guesses on that? You should look into the question of Germany's use of railway shipping to send Jews to death camps versus sending supplies to the fighting fronts.

Hold on to the root.

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