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Comment: Re:Whats the "bundle" format? (Score 1) 97

by cockroach2 (#44959461) Attached to: BitTorrent "Bundles" Create Cash Registers Inside Artwork

I was wondering the same thing. If it's some kind of DRM it's going to require its own proprietary player and will fail. If it's just a gentle reminder that, should you feel so inclined, you can buy this piece of music over there it would seem that this could have been solved with a simple ID3 tag.

Comment: Re:Duh, they are a publisher (Score 4, Informative) 463

by cockroach2 (#44029073) Attached to: MS To Indie Devs: You Have a To Have a Publisher

The support is not what I care about, but I have to choose whether I want to keep that feature (which I did) or still be able to use the console for gaming (which I'm not). So true, my original statement was slightly wrong, it should have been something like:

They sold a product with features X and Y, then went "nah, you can't really have both" (i.e. other OS, PSN).

Still not the honest thing.

Comment: Re:Sigh... (Score 1) 205

by cockroach2 (#43232421) Attached to: Google Launches 'Keep' To Rival Evernote

I was in a similar siatuation a while ago and chose to host everything on my own. Sure it means a bit of work (and I have to admit I'm not quite done yet) but if you enjoy sysadmin stuff it's not too time-consuming and you might be able to learn something, i.e. I chose to use FreeBSD which I'd never used before. Plus things like owncloud should make calendar and contacts synchronization quite simple without relying on third parties to keep their services running.

Of course the major downside is that you will have to do backups and hard drive replacements on your own. With a reasonable RAID configuration and using one of the many cloud storage providers for (of course highly encrypted) backups that shouldn't be too bad though.

Or you could do something in between, i.e. rent a "server" from somebody like amazon or gandi if you don't want to worry about hardware.

To me, the small amount of work and money that is required to run my own infrastructure is certainly worth it not to have to trust a third party with my data, plus running your own things gives you great options for random hacks and fun little projects.

Comment: Re:The best legal stimulant, but should be respect (Score 1) 212

by cockroach2 (#42790423) Attached to: Why It's So Hard To Predict How Caffeine Will Affect Your Body

Well, I envy you. I haven't felt any effect from coffee in ages (I literally cannot remember if it ever affected me) and I can easily go to sleep after a strong cup of coffee. I may have to try significantly higher dosages but I don't really like the idea. Having a substance as easily available as coffee actually keep you awake must be awesome...

Comment: Re:Since when? (Score 3, Interesting) 398

by cockroach2 (#42733007) Attached to: How <em>EVE Online</em> Dealt With a 3,000-Player Battle

Low-sec still offers plenty of opportunities for solo / small gang PvP, whether you learn it on your own or as part of a noob-friendly corp is entirely up to you. I went pirate after some dreadful months in high-sec and I have to say it was probably the best EVE-related decision I ever made.

Comment: Re:$3600 ship (Score 1) 398

by cockroach2 (#42732831) Attached to: How <em>EVE Online</em> Dealt With a 3,000-Player Battle

Well yes and no. Money allows you to buy game time which in turn you can sell to other people for in-game currency. While in reality the difference is not too relevant, you can't directly buy in-game currency, you can however pay for someone else's monthly subscription in exchange for in-game money.

Comment: Re:$3600 ship (Score 5, Informative) 398

by cockroach2 (#42732807) Attached to: How <em>EVE Online</em> Dealt With a 3,000-Player Battle

Technically he didn't jump to enemy controlled territory but to an area that isn't strictly controlled by players. From what I read the idea was to drop some big guns on top of a handful of enemies in a "neutral" system, a couple of enemies that were pleasantly surprised when instead of a sizable fleet they got a juicy target.

Then everybody called in reinforcements plus the locals also wanted to join the party.

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