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Comment: Re:This is going to end so well for them! (Score 3, Informative) 147

It's only for TETHERING beyond the allowed limit on unlimited data connections. Let me say that again, TETHERING only and only when you've used up you're tethering allowance for the month. Hell, they basically said you can tether as much as you want for everything else, which is pretty freaking cool.

If you've got tons of bittorrents running over your TETHERED t-mobile connection beyond 2.5 GB/month, you're a douche. You brought this on yourself and no cell phone company should have to put up with it.

Comment: y mine everything just like everyone else. (Score 3, Insightful) 114

by cmorriss (#47586473) Attached to: Google+ Photos To Be Separated From Google+

Good lord people. They use your information to display ads. Just like almost every other social network in existence. Clearly this isn't a sticking point for most people or Facebook would be a ghost town.

Problem for you? Fine don't use it, but it's not like it's a secret. For most people it's worth the conveniences Google provides to have their data mined. I know it is for me.

Comment: Re: This reminds me of a great Simpsons episode (Score 1) 625

by cmorriss (#47229435) Attached to: EU's Top Court May Define Obesity As a Disability

There are an innumerable set of resources available to help someone lose weight or help people with doing self harm. That's not what this is about.

This is about whether the employer must accept the responsibility of adjusting to the person's condition. Think of it as giving an employee time at work to gamble online because of their addiction vs. providing time off to get help at a treatment facility.

It is most definitely a slippery slope, especially since this is case law being set.

Comment: Re:Of course vendors love it (Score 4, Informative) 99

This has nothing to do with cloud computing service providers. OpenStack is more about companies using the software for private clouds in which case they would be running it in their own data center.

In this case, customers are still not picking it up even though they could have cloud computing without the service providers dicking them over.

I think the software will have to prove itself over time in addition to companies figuring out how it fits into their data centers. Red Hat throwing it's support weight behind it will definitely help.

Comment: Re:No price != No cost (Score 1) 409

by cmorriss (#46533181) Attached to: Why Buy Microsoft Milk When the Google Cow Is Free?

The advertisers are the customer and you are the product.

Ugh, not this crap again. I'm a customer who pays with my information. Google then takes that information and offers it to advertisers. So, if Google wants me to keep paying with my information, they have to provide me, their customer, with a good service.

It is possible to have more than one type of customer.

Comment: Re:consumerism at its finest (Score 1) 49

by cmorriss (#46305677) Attached to: Google's Project Tango Seeks To Map a 3D World

Lowe's already has this in their mobile app. They recently added bin numbers to all their shelving. Select a store, search for something and it will give you the aisle and shelf number in addition a map of the store with the location pointed out.

So this is pretty much done, and in a very nice way.

Comment: Re:what price increases? (Score 1) 424

by cmorriss (#46259345) Attached to: Time Warner Deal Is How Comcast Will Fight Cord Cutters

It's technology. You pointed out yourself how the price per mbs has dropped over the years and then suggest for some reason it should now go up. Technology naturally drops in price because of advances regardless of how many people are using it. Unless of course you have a monopoly.

Comment: Re:It's called Gcoin now. (Score 1) 157

by cmorriss (#46056135) Attached to: Google Says It Has "No Current Plans Regarding Bitcoin"

Wow, where to begin.

First of all, in-store credit vouchers are not "their own currency" at all. They're just U.S. dollars with restrictions on where they can be spent. They'll always be worth the same amount in dollars because they're not a separate currency at all. other currencies values are tracked separately from each other. Yes, a particular currency can be tied to another currency, but at any point, that tie can be severed. A voucher's tie to the U.S. dollar can NEVER be severed because it IS U.S. dollars.

All cryptocurrencies that follow the same architecture of bitcoin by their nature are controlled by 51% of the owners of the currency. Just because a company creates a new currency and blesses it by accepting it at all their terminals doesn't mean it's controlled by them, as long as it follows the bitcoin architecture.

I was VERY skeptical of bitcoin until I read this article by Marc Andreesen: http://techland.time.com/2014/...

Yes, he has a lot invested in bitcoin companies which gives him a bias and some of his arguments are in my opinion flat out wrong, the majority of what he says does sound very interesting and gave me a new perspective on the currency.

Comment: Re:bad bad idea (Score 2) 339

by cmorriss (#45917341) Attached to: Google Begins To Merge Google+, Gmail Contacts

Good lord. I understand Slashdot folks generally don't like to read the actual article, but I don't think a single comment on this has come from someone who actually read it.

It is simply and integration between G+ and gmail. They are NOT merging. IF you use G+, then you'll be able to send emails to people in G+ without having to know their email address. It's a nice convenience. That is all.

So if you're not using G+ for anything now, nothing at all will change for you in gmail. If you are using it, you will get some nice new feature.

Comment: Re:All or nothing (Score 3, Insightful) 903

by cmorriss (#45837913) Attached to: US Justice Blocks Implementation of ACA Contraceptive Mandate

Everyone can get access to as much healthcare as they want. This simply is a determination of whether very specific religious organizations are required by law to pay for something they find unethical. Just because something isn't covered by insurance doesn't mean it is denied to them. They must simply pay for it on their own. This isn't something that even costs that much.

Comment: Re:How many don't use the chrome part? (Score 2) 321

by cmorriss (#45813609) Attached to: Chromebooks Have a Lucrative Year; Should WinTel Be Worried?

I bought an Acer C720 for my wife. Chrome OS is nearly perfect for her. All she does is surf the web and the small amount of photo editing can be done in web apps like pixelr. Plex and Netflix work like champs.

The only hitch was Skype as she uses it to talk to her family in Italy. That's where linux comes in. Installed crouton and have it running aside chrome OS. Skype runs beautifully in it and she can hear a call while in chrome OS and switch with a single key combo and switch back when finished.

Microsoft should be worried about this. It will only improve and piece by piece take over the last remaining bastion of their empire.

Comment: Re:Transparency (Score 2) 289

by cmorriss (#45100779) Attached to: CPJ Report: the Obama Administration and Press Freedoms

Are you on drugs? Bush was lambasted by the media. Constantly. Now Obama is in office. Remember how we're still fighting a war in Afghanistan? What happened to Guantanimo? The only reason we know ANYTHING about the NSA is because every news outlet would be dumb as a bag of rocks not to report it. It was thrown in their lap.

Who knows what else is going on. There's very little real journalism in today's media. Part of that really is a belief by many in the media that Obama is overall a great man and they should not pound him too hard for anything, and part of that is because of the KGB like surveillance of the media keeping everyone else in line as much as possible.

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