Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: New Rights (Score 1) 408

by clbyjack81 (#27093999) Attached to: The Real Reason For Microsoft's TomTom Lawsuit

... and depriving consumers of their fundamental right to have access to data of their own creation.

Why do we need to keep creating new rights? I thought we had a right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. I don't recall the founding documents mentioning healthcare, housing, or the interoperability of manufactured goods as fundamental rights.

... our duty to users everywhere to violate those bits of intellectual property at every possible opportunity until it becomes such a legal nightmare for these companies that they are forced to back down. Anything less would be uncivilized.

Another alternative is to petition your congressman/woman to change the laws to the same effect. I would imagine this to be a more civilized answer.

I know, I'm an idealist.

Classic Games (Games)

Are Neo-Retro Game Releases a Fad? 266

Posted by Soulskill
from the new-starcon-game-please dept.
With modern console technology making it easy to develop and distribute small games, more and more companies are taking advantage of gamers' nostalgia to re-release decades-old hits, and to create entirely new titles in older styles. Gamasutra takes a look at what the retro game fad has become, and where it can go from here. What old games or series do you think would translate well onto today's consoles? "Many gamers who bought Mega Man 9 did so because of the game's inherent nostalgia, or because they never had a chance to enjoy the older games on the Nintendo Entertainment System when they were younger. Mega Man 9 is very much a product of its context. Its gameplay is fantastic, but it too is a product of the time period in which it reigned supreme. It suggests the question: can neo-retro games stand the test of time? Will games that mimic or lampoon the 8-bit era remain relevant and interesting to the masses long after its original audience has disappeared?"

Comment: Re:Classic problem. (Score 1) 567

by clbyjack81 (#25072901) Attached to: Should Organic Chemistry Be a Premed Requirement?
2) O-Chem is more than memorization, it is flexibility in applying the memorized data - synthesis

Amen. Synthesis problems in Organic Chemistry are like combining chess with LEGO models. You know what you have to build (a molecule), you have memorized what pieces (reactions) you can use, but you are very limited in what order you can use them (like chess).

One reaction can interfere with a part of the molecule you didn't want to affect. Reactions can tack on parts where you want and where you don't want them to go. It takes far more than memorization to succeed in a well-designed Organic Chemistry course. You must develop a mastery of both the tactics and strategy of synthesis in order to do well in this subject.

This problem solving technique is very similar to the medical diagnosis and treatment steps. You have to take into account side-effects and drug interactions when picking what treatment option to use.

I am currently in the middle of a Ph.D. program in Organic Chemistry and I have several MD and DDS friends. It is through conversations with them that I have come to appreciate how important my field is to the development of a medical professional.

The Military

F-117A Stealth Fighter Retired 476

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the so-freaking-cool dept.
zonker writes "Nearly 30 years ago Lockheed Martin's elite Skunk Works team developed what would become the F-117A Nighthawk Stealth Fighter. A few of their earlier projects include the SR-71 Blackbird and U2 Dragon Lady spy planes. Today is the last for the Stealth Fighter, which is being replaced by the F-22 Raptor (another Skunk Works project)."
Biotech

PETA Offers X-Prize for Artificial Meat 1130

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the surprisingly-practical dept.
Bored MPA writes "The Times reports that PETA is to announce plans on Monday for a $1 million prize to the "first person to come up with a method to produce commercially viable quantities of in vitro meat at competitive prices by 2012." PETA founder Ingrid Newkirk addressed the controversial decision by saying, "We don't mind taking uncomfortable positions if it means that fewer animals suffer." An unexpected and pragmatic move from an organization that has a strong base of support from pro-organic vegans." The question I always had about this- if they can take one sample from one animal and clone it in a vat and feed this world, will the vegans be ok with that?

People are always available for work in the past tense.

Working...