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Submission + - Games makers open-source 5 popular games (

christian.einfeldt writes: "According to Linux blogger Ken Starks, an informal consortium of games makers has come together to announce that they are releasing the source code on some very popular games. The games are being released as part of a bundle of code called the 'Humble Indie Bundle,' and include the following games: Aquaria, by Bit Blot; Gish, by Chronic Logic; World of Goo, by 2d Boy; Lugaru, by Wolfire; and the Penumbra series by Frictional Games. Gamers can pay whatever they want for the code, and can also choose to donate part of their payments to charities such as Child's Play or the Electronic Frontier Foundation. To date, contributions total $1,070,370 from 117,764 contributors. Contributions are itemized by game platform, with Linux gamers contributing just less than one-quarter of the contributions, almost equal to the contributions from Mac gamers and about half the contributions from Microsoft Windows gamers. These contributions have exceeded the companies "craziest expectations" according to a quote on Wolfire's Humble Indie Bundle website."

Submission + - Linspire founder creates new Internet Radio Mashup (

christian.einfeldt writes: "Michael Robertson, founder of the Lindows aka Linspire Linux distribution, has created another Internet mashup, called, which claims to let you 'Listen anywhere to your free, personalized radio station. Play just what you want with full control: skip, rewind, or fast-forward.', which stands for 'Build Your Own', uses voice samples from notable persons such as Barack Obama to read feeds from your local or national news (such as NPR or CNN), weather, sports (such as ESPN or CBS), and traffic, as well as listen to music you select from your account. It also plays music from artists. Robertson has gained notoriety from making money by being sued and then settling with the plaintiffs, who end up paying him to stop his innovative work. For example, Robertson created, was sued by the big labels for copyright infringement, and walked away with millions; and was sued by Microsoft for using the name Lindows for his commercial Linux distribution, later to be called Linspire, after Microsoft paid Robertson millions to stop using the name Lindows. Will he repeat again with"

Submission + - Texas Linux Fest coming up (

christian.einfeldt writes: "Penguinistas in the Lone Star State will soon get a chance to share the love at the upcoming Texas Linux Fest, taking place on April 10, 2010. This event is signficant due to the fact that is the first Linux fest of this size to be held in Texas, according to long-time Linux advocate and blogger Ken Starks, who offers this interview of one of the event's founders, Nate Willis. The saying goes that they do everything big in Texas, and the promoters are hoping that this event will be no exception, as they are billing it as a regional event, according to Starks' interview with Willis."

Submission + - Linux reaches 32% netbook market share (

christian.einfeldt writes: "Linux netbooks have captured 32% of the global netbook market, says Jeff Orr, an analyst with consumer computer research firm ABI Research. The largest share of netbook sales is in the Asia-Pacific region, including Japan, Australia and New Zealand, Lai's article reports, according to Orr's interview with Eric Lai, a reporter with ABI's latest figures coincide with a statement by Dell executives from February of this year, in which they said that Linux netbooks comprise about 33% of Dell shipments of Dell Inspiron mini 9s netbooks. The ABI Research figures, together with the statements by the Dell executives, cast doubt on claims by Microsoft that Windows XP captured 98% of the netbook market, a figure Microsoft later reported as 93% market share. In an interview with, Orr made clear that the 32% Linux netbook market share did not include either user-intalled Linux or dual-boot systems, but was confined to just pre-installed Linux shipments."

Submission + - Washington Post says use Linux to avoid bank fraud (

christian.einfeldt writes: "Washington Post columnist Brian Krebs recommends that banking customers consider using a Linux LiveCD, rather than Microsoft Windows, to access their on-line banking. He tells a story of two businesses which lost $100,000 USD and $447,000 USD, respectively, when the thieves — armed with malware on the company controller's PC — were able to intercept one of those codes when the controller tried to log in, and then delay the controller from logging in. Krebs notes that he is not alone in recommending the use of non-Windows machines for banking; The Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center (FS-ISAC) — a industry group supported by some of the world's largest banks — recently issued guidelines urging businesses to carry out all online banking activities form 'a stand-alone, hardened and completely locked down computer system from where regular e-mail and Web browsing is not possible.' Krebs concludes his article with a link to an earlier column in which he steps readers through the process of booting Linux LiveCDs to do their on-line banking."

Submission + - How Granpa met Tux the Penguin (

christian.einfeldt writes: "Ken Starks, of Austin, Texas, has been blogging (some would say ranting) for years about the ups and downs of moving to Linux. Now, Starks is hitting his stride with an entertaining story of how an 85 year-old graphics designer happened to meander by chance into the Life of Linux. Starks does a remarkable job of developing the his story's characters with sparingly few words and a well-placed photo or two. Starks writes with a wry wit and a great sense of pacing that reminds one of Mark Twain's style. Like Twain, Ken Starks is usually provocative, but always entertaining."
Linux Business

Submission + - Forkable Linux radio ad now on the air in Texas (

christian.einfeldt writes: "Everyone is familiar with the Linux video ads created by IBM, Red Hat, and Novell, but until recently, there have not been any professionally-backed forkable radio ads. Now, Austin-based Linux advocate Ken Starks has obtained the services of a professional radio talent in creating a high quality voice track, which can be easily adapted by local providers of Linux computer services. The raw material addresses end-user frustration with Microsoft Windows malware, and promotes Linux as a more stable alternative. Starks hopes the raw material will seed pro-Linux ads across the US, and he offers his own final product as an example of how the raw material can be remixed with music. He has released all of the raw material and final work under the Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, and has waived the Attribution requirement in his blog. His blog links to both the raw material and his final product. Starks' provocative ads are currently on the air in the Austin market during the popular talk show of Kim Komando, who just happens to be a Microsoft Windows enthusiast."

Looking Forward, Ubuntu Linux 6.06 383

SilentBob4 writes to tell us that Mad Penguin has an interesting look at the upcoming version of Ubuntu. From the article: "All in all, Ubuntu 6.06 is gearing up to be quite an impressive release. Granted, I saw some bugs during my stay on the distribution, but can I really complain? It's not a full release, so it deserves some breathing room. Considering some of the horribly authored software I've looked at over the years, I feel that Ubuntu in pre-release form is more stable than other distros when they reach final release status. It's not quite in the league of Slackware and Red Hat/Fedora in that respect yet, but it's surely getting there in a hurry. As I said before, it smoked Fedora Core 5 performance-wise, so in that department it's solidly ahead."

Stellar rays prove fibbing never pays. Embezzlement is another matter.