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Businesses

Worker Fired For Disabling GPS App That Tracked Her 24 Hours a Day 776 776

An anonymous reader writes: Myrna Arias claims she was fired for refusing to run an app that would track her location even when she was off the clock. She is now suing Intermex Wire Transfer LLC in a Kern County Superior Court. Her claim reads in part: "After researching the app and speaking with a trainer from Xora, Plaintiff and her co-workers asked whether Intermex would be monitoring their movements while off duty. Stubits admitted that employees would be monitored while off duty and bragged that he knew how fast she was driving at specific moments ever since she installed the app on her phone. Plaintiff expressed that she had no problem with the app's GPS function during work hours, but she objected to the monitoring of her location during non-work hours and complained to Stubits that this was an invasion of her privacy. She likened the app to a prisoner's ankle bracelet and informed Stubits that his actions were illegal. Stubits replied that she should tolerate the illegal intrusion...."
Businesses

Report: Apple Watch Preorders Almost 1 Million On First Day In the US 290 290

An anonymous reader writes The launch of the Apple Watch has got off to a good start, with an estimated 1 million pre-orders in the U.S. on Friday. "According to Slice's Sunday report, which is based on e-receipt data obtained directly from consumers, 957,000 people preordered the Watch on Friday, with 62% purchasing the cheapest variant, the Apple Watch Sport. On average, each buyer ordered 1.3 watches and spent $503.83 per watch."

Comment: UX Nightmare! (Score 1) 15 15

Controlling music? What does Douglas Adams have to say about that?

"For years radios had been operated by means of pressing buttons and turning dials; then as the technology became more sophisticated the controls were made touch-sensitive—you merely had to brush the panels with your fingers; now all you had to do was wave your hand in the general direction of the components and hope. It saved a lot of muscular expenditure, of course, but meant that you had to sit infuriatingly still if you wanted to keep listening to the same program."

Comment: Re:Oh good (Score 1) 164 164

I remember when The Science Channel, National Geographic, and Discovery showed actual science programming. Now they are filled with programming about loudmouth d-bags and their "dangerous" jobs, or redneck-backwoods survivors, or people doing stuff naked... I also remember when MTV played videos... Get off my lawn!

God helps them that themselves. -- Benjamin Franklin, "Poor Richard's Almanac"

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