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Submission + - Many Watering Holes, Targets In Hacks That Netted Facebook, Twitter and Apple (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: "There's more information on the hacks that compromised Twitter, Facebook Apple and Microsoft. According to a story by The Security Ledger, the attacks were part of a wide-ranging operation that relied on many “watering hole” web sites that attracted employees from prominent firms across the U.S.
The assailants responsible for the cyber attacks used at least two mobile application development sites as watering holes in addition to the one web site that has been disclosed: iPhoneDevSDK.com. Still other watering hole web sites used in the attack weren’t specific to mobile application developers – or even to software development. Still, they served almost identical attacks to employees of a wide range of target firms, across industries, including prominent auto manufacturers, U.S. government agencies and even a leading candy maker, according to sources with knowledge of the operation."

Government

Submission + - Rich Countries Better At Protect Citizens...from Malware (securityledger.com) 1

chicksdaddy writes: "NOTE — I'm resubmitting this to correct the description. In the previous submission I flipped the positive/negative correlation of wealth to cyber security — saying the exact opposite of what I wanted to! Apologies!

"To paraphrase a quote attributed to F. Scott Fitzgerald: ‘Rich countries aren’t like everyone else. They have less malware.’ That’s the conclusion of a special Security Intelligence Report from Microsoft, anyway. The special supplement, released on Wednesday, investigated the links between rates of computer infections and a range of national characteristics including the relative wealth of a nation, observance of the rule of law and the rate of software piracy. The conclusion: cyber security (by Microsoft’s definition: low rates of malware infection) correlated _positively_ with many characteristics of wealthy nations – high Gross Income Per Capita, higher broadband penetration and investment in R&D and high rates of literacy. It correlated _negatively_ with characteristics common in poorer nations – like demographic instability, political instability and lower levels of education.""

Government

Submission + - Rich Countries Better At Protecting Citizens...From Malware (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: "To paraphrase a quote attributed to F. Scott Fitzgerald: ‘Rich countries aren’t like everyone else. They have less malware.’ That’s the conclusion of a special Security Intelligence Report from Microsoft, anyway. The special supplement, released on Wednesday, investigated the links between rates of computer infections and a range of national characteristics including the relative wealth of a nation, observance of the rule of law and the rate of software piracy. The conclusion: cyber security (by Microsoft’s definition: low rates of malware infection) correlated negatively with many characteristics of wealth nations – high Gross Income Per Capita, higher broadband penetration and investment in R&D and high rates of literacy. It correlated positively with characteristics common in poorer nations – like demographic instability, political instability and lower levels of education."
China

Submission + - Human Rights Group Report Warns of Cyber's Growing 'Dark Side' (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: "The head of a prominent human rights groups has warned that increased state involvement in cyberspace, including surveillance, censorship, propaganda campaigns and offensive cyber operations threatens the future of the Internet as much as endemic problems like cyber crime – part of a growing “dark side” to cyberspace.

Writing in the Penn State Journal of Law and International Affairs, Ronald Deibert, Director of Citizen Lab and Canada Centre for Global Security Studies said that threats to human rights and individual liberties come from a variety of states – from authoritarian regimes, to Latin American narco-states to liberal democracies in the West, as governments increasingly leverage the power of the Internet to monitor citizens’ behavior and impose limits on free expression.

Sophisticated, global cyber criminal operations are part of that – thriving and innovating even as law enforcement struggles to pursue criminal organizations across international boundaries. Even more concerning are the ways in which “the worlds of cyber crime are blurring into acts of espionage, sabotage and even warfare,” he said.

And, while conventional wisdom has long assumed authoritarian regimes would wither in the face of the unfettered access to information provided by the Internet, Deibert said that, in some cases, just the opposite is true. Regimes, including those in China, Syria, Vietnam and Iran “have successfully employed second and third generation control techniques to penetrate and immobilize opposition, cultivating a climate of fear and self-censorship,” he said."

Government

Submission + - Pennsylvania Man Indicted For Hack of Department of Energy Network (threatpost.com)

chicksdaddy writes: "A Pennsylvania man was arrested yesterday after a Massachusetts grand jury issued a four-count indictment alleging that he hacked into computer networks belonging to the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) and the University of Massachusetts, as well as private firms in Massachusetts and Colorado.

Andrew James Miller, a 23 year-old resident of the Philadelphia suburbs, was charged with one count of conspiracy, two counts of computer fraud and one count of access device fraud. Miller is alleged to have sold access to his victims' networks to an undercover FBI agent for payments of between $500 and $1,000. At one point, he even offered access to a DoE supercomputer for $50,000."

Security

Submission + - Mass. AG, Victim of iTunes Fraud, Wants Answers (threatpost.com)

chicksdaddy writes: Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley told an audience of business leaders on Tuesday that her office will inquire into long-standing complaints about fraudulent purchases that use iTunes, Apple's popular online music store.

Speaking at the inauguration of Massachusetts' new Advanced Cyber Security Center, Coakley said she had been the victim of identity theft in recent months, and that her stolen debit card information was used to make fraudulent iTunes purchases. When asked (by a Threatpost reporter) about whether such fraud constitutes a reportable event under the Bay State's strict data breach notification law, 201 CMR 17, Coakley said that her office would be looking into that question and demanding answers from Cupertino, California-based Apple, which has steadfastly refused to respond to media queries about the pattern of fraudulent purchases.

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