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America Online

Submission + - AOL's "Dirty Little Secret": 60% of AOL's Profits (huffingtonpost.com) 4

satuon writes: Ken Auletta's big New Yorker piece on AOL (subscription only) this week revealed an interesting detail about the company's inner workings. According to Auletta, 80% of AOL's profits come from subscribers, and 75% of those subscribers are paying for something they don't actually need.

Auletta lays out how this works:
The company still gets eighty percent of its profits from subscribers, many of whom are older people who have cable or DSL service but don't realize that they need not pay an additional twenty-five dollars a month to get online and check their e-mail. "The dirty little secret," a former AOL executive says, "is that seventy-five percent of the people who subscribe to AOL's dial-up service don't need it."

Submission + - Paypal alternatives? 6

dotancohen writes: It seems that everything that I used to do with Paypal is gone, and nobody has found a good alternative yet. This month I tried donating to Anki (but Paypal is no longer serving Japan for donations) and Virtual Identity (which stopped accepting Paypal due to the Wikileaks incident). The authors of both software are looking for alternatives. What can we recommend to them? What reliable and inexpensive money-transfer services exist today? What do you use?

Submission + - Why Eric Schmidt left as CEO of Google? China (newyorker.com)

Edsj writes: It seems Eric Schmidt didn't like the decision to deliver uncensored searches in China. It is reported the decision to withdraw censored searches in China was made by co-founder Larry Page sided with his founding partner, Sergey Brin and probably an internal battle for power begun. Schmidt also wasn't happy with the “don’t be evil” policy, something the Google founders were prepared to protect anytime. Schmidt lost some energy and focus after losing the China internal battle and decided to leave the position of CEO. It is also reported that the chairman position is a temporary one until he finds another business to take care.

Submission + - Betelgeuse To Blow Up "Soon" (discovermagazine.com)

rubycodez writes: A wave of 2012 related hoopla has hit the internet, about the star that makes the "right shoulder" of Orion the hunter, Betelgeuse. Astronomer Phil Plait once again puts rumors to rest. The star will indeed explode as a type II supernova, and when it does it will be brighter than Venus on Earth though not as bright as the full moon. It will be visible in the night sky for weeks, as well as possibly be visible in the day sky for a short time. But that event could happen today, or 100,000 years from now or as much as a million years from now. Since Betelgeuse is over 600 light years away, its violent death will not harm Earth in any way, but definitely will provide a huge bonanza of scientific information about supernova. As geeks, we can only hope the core of Betelgeuse undergoes catastrophic failure in our lifetime.

Submission + - Apple App Store hits 10B app download mark (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: The Apple App Store hit the 10 billion app download mark overnight on Friday, marking a milestone involving an awful lot of Doodle Jump, Tap Tap Revenge and Angry Birds playing, not to mention Facebook and Pandora usage. The Apple App Store hit the 1 billion mark in April of 2009, after opening in July of 2008.

Apple is rewarding the downloader of the 10 billionth free or paid App Store app with a $10,000 iTunes gift card in a bit of showmanship that Willy Wonka would be proud of. As of 7AM EST, however, Apple hadn’t publicly identified the winner, only saying that you’d need to come back later to find out who won.

Apple put an iOS app countdown ticker http://www.apple.com/itunes/10-billion-app-countdown/ on its Website last week to build buzz around the milestone and generated about 250 million app downloads since. It also revealed a list of all-time most downloaded free and paid iPhone and iPad apps. http://www.networkworld.com/news/2011/011911-apple-appstore-iphone-ipad-downloads.html

The Internet

Submission + - The end of the net as we know it (pcpro.co.uk)

Barence writes: Britain’s leading ISPs are attempting to construct a two-tier internet, where websites and services that are willing to pay are thrust into the “fast lane”, while those that don’t are left fighting for scraps of bandwidth or even blocked outright. Asked directly whether ISP TalkTalk would be willing to cut off access completely to BBC iPlayer in favour of YouTube if the latter was prepared to sign a big enough cheque, TalkTalk’s Andrew Heaney replied: “We’d do a deal, and we’d look at YouTube and we’d look at BBC and we should have freedom to sign whatever deal works.” Britain's biggest ISP, BT, meanwhile says it could "absolutely could see situations in which some content or application providers might want to pay BT for a quality of service above best efforts." PC Pro asks if it's the end of the net as we know it.

Submission + - Duke Nukem Forever release date set... May 3rd (take2games.com)

markass530 writes: "On May 3, you may actually be able to see your breathe in Hell when it begins to freeze over. The unbelievable has happened, and after years of jokes, years of failed attempts, years as the poster boy for video game franchises that seemed doomed to remain in limbo, Take-Two Interactive has announced that Duke Nukem Forever will hit stores on May 3. If you need a moment to process that, go ahead, it’s understandable."

Comment Re:Does the droid and iPhone do this?! (Score 1) 668

You really fail. I have 5 remote apps and I know I don't have even close to all of the ones available.

All so I can cover: VNC, NX, SSH, RDP and the myriad of combinations in between and through various OSes and my iPhone has NEVER been jailbroken.

The one I use the most is iSSH since it does raw VNC or tunneled through SSH and because I can write my own macros for the SSH terminal (which is handy for quick administration of services at home).

I also heavily use LogMeIn with my Mac at home.

Comment Submitter Doesn't Get It (Score 1) 224

As usual.

This starts pitting Hulu even more squarely against iTunes for anyone who watches more than a few shows a month.

It's not like Apple cares if Hulu competes since the company makes relatively little off of the iTMS. It exists solely to create an ecosystem that encourages the sale of Apple hardware. If the owners of other products want to buy from them as well, that's just a bit of gravy for them. If iPod/iPhone/iPad users buy from some other site, that's fine too--Apple has already made money off of them when they sold the hardware.

United Kingdom

Submission + - Volcano grounds all UK aircraft (bbc.co.uk)

I confirm I'm not a writes: The ash-laden cloud from a volcanic eruption in Iceland has grounded all flights in the UK and parts of Northern Europe. According to the Daily Mail this is more severe than the flight restrictions introduced immediately following 911. Strangely, the skies over Glasgow are blue — not the usual muddy grey...
Data Storage

Submission + - The Hard Drive Death Watch Begins Now (gadgetopolis.com)

gjt writes: When Intel and OCZ recently announced new "affordable" Solid State Disk drives — offering a meager 32-40GB — we initially yawned. But, then we took a closer look at the press releases and the in-progress research and development in SSD technology and opened our eyes. While the new drives aren't affordable on a cost per gigabyte basis for everyone, it does set a precedent — and most importantly a barometer price of $100. And it really does start the death clock for hard drive technology.

Submission + - Rumor: Palm ditching webOS for Android? 8

An anonymous reader writes: Jon Rubinstein, in an internal Palm memo that will be released in full shortly, is showing support for Android to replace the webOS on the Palm Pre Plus. Citing competition with the iPhone and exponential growth from the Android operating system (specifically mentioning the Motorola Droid), the leaked memo first came as a confidential internal email to certain members of the software development branch of the company.

The memo partially states: "While Palm is incredibly proud of our engineers who spent timeless work and effort to bring us this advanced operating system, consumers simply have not caught on. To provide a better future for ourselves and our customers, the only logical choice is to transition our hardware and software to the Android platform."

WebOS won't officially go away (the UI and notifications feature, which have been heavily praised by reviewers, are more than likely going to be integrated, a la Sense UI, into the Android platform), according to the memo.

Software engineers are to begin working on Palm's own builds of Android as soon as the device maker officially joins the Open Handset Alliance, which other executives at Palm say could be as soon as next week. An official statement from the company is expected as soon as the union is made.

Palm Inc.'s stock took a nosedive earlier this month when it was reported that its projections for revenue were down 50% than initially estimated. On Friday, the stock fell $1.65, or 29%, to $4.00. That value remained relatively unchanged during Monday's trading.

The full leaked memo will be posted on wikileaks.org around midnight Eastern.

Submission + - Malware delivered by Yahoo, Fox, Google ads (cnet.com)

WrongSizeGlass writes: CNET is reporting that Avast has tracked over 2.6 million instances of malware that have been served up to unsuspecting web surfers since last December by ad services such as Yahoo's Yield Manager, Fox Audience Network's Fimserve.com and even some from Google's DoubleClick. Some high-profile sites include The New York Times, Drudge Report.com, TechCrunch and WhitePages.com. The practice has been dubbed "malvertising."
I usually suspect the users of 'careless web activity' when I delouse a PC, but now I'm going to have to give some the benefit of the doubt.


Submission + - The biggest cloud providers are botnets (networkworld.com)

Julie188 writes: Google is made up of 500,000 systems, 1 million CPUs and 1,500 gigabits per second (Gbps) of bandwdith, according to cloud service provider Neustar. Amazon comes in second with 160,000 systems, 320,000 CPUs and 400 Gbps of bandwidth, while Rackspace offers 65,000 systems, 130,000 CPUs and 300 Gbps. But these clouds are dwarfed by the likes of the really big cloud services, otherwise known as botnets. Conficker controls 6.4 million computer systems in 230 countries, with more than 18 million CPUs and 28 terabits per second of bandwidth.

Artificial intelligence has the same relation to intelligence as artificial flowers have to flowers. -- David Parnas