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Submission + - Making a tablet run only one application. 2

An anonymous reader writes: I'm working for a medical centre who want to make a tablet with various videos and webpages about smoking cessation available in their waiting room. The tablet can't access the internet because of security policies. I'm planning to use a local server with copies of the (creative commons) videos and pages accessed through local webpages using the tablet's browser. How can I make only the browser be available to the tablet users? Ideas? Suggestions?

Submission + - Researchers Discover Serious Flaw in Android's App (

Pierre Bezukhov writes: Researchers led by North Carolina State associate professor Xuxian Jiang have discovered a serious flaw in the Android OS's approach to app security.

They found that some pre-loaded apps and features from Android device manufacturers could be exploited by hackers.

Jiang's study characterize the vulnerability as a "classic confused deputy attack," in which one app (virus) tricks another (legitimate) app or feature into leaking information or capabilities it has permission to access.

The breach of some of these permissions could allow hackers to "wipe out the user data on the phones, send out SMS messages (e.g., to premium numbers), record user conversation, or obtain user geo-locations," the study stated.

Submission + - Watch The Darkest Hour Online (

An anonymous reader writes: The Darkest Hour is an upcoming 3D science-fiction film directed by Chris Gorak and produced by Timur Bekmambetov. The American-based production depicts an alien invasion in Russia

Submission + - Romotive Turns Your Smartphone Into A Robot (

kkleiner writes: "How awesome is Romo the Smartphone Robot? Without knowing anything about it, you simply have to look at the robot’s Kickstarter page. The pledge goal was $32,000. The robot has raised $114,796.
I’d say these guys are on to something. They’ve built a robotics platform that uses a smartphone for a brain to control a mobile, two-track base. Just attach your smartphone to the base, plug a cord into the earphone jack, download the apps, and using another smartphone, iPad, or computer to control it – you’ve got a robot!"


Submission + - Is Microsoft Office coming to Apple's iPad? (

PolygamousRanchKid writes: According to some unnamed sources of the Daily writer Matt Hickey, Microsoft is prepping iPad-versions of its Office suite of software. "With the iPad making up over 80 percent of the tablet market and millions of people worldwide using Office, that could mean big bucks for the tech giant based in Redmond, Wash.," Hickey wrote in his report. "In addition to an iPad-ready version, a new edition of Office is expected for OS X Lion sometime next year." Currently, Apple has a few Office-like productivity apps of its own, with its iWork suite (Pages, Numbers and Keynote) on the Mac, iPhone/iPod Touch and iPad. If Microsoft were to challenge iWork on the iPad (and maybe even iPhone) with Office, apps for Word, Excel and PowerPoint could go head-to-head with Apple's own productivity apps.

Submission + - Permafrost loss greater threat than deforestation? (

Pierre Bezukhov writes: Emissions from thawing permafrost may contribute more to global warming than deforestation this century, according to a commentary in the journal Nature.

Arctic warming of 7.5 degrees Celsius (13.5 degrees Fahrenheit) this century may unlock the equivalent of 380 billion tons of carbon dioxide as soils thaw, allowing carbon to escape as CO2 and methane, University of Florida and University of Alaska biologists wrote today in Nature. Two degrees of warming would release a third of that, they said.

The Arctic is an important harbinger of climate change because the United Nations calculates it’s warming at almost twice the average rate for the planet. The study adds to pressure on United Nations climate treaty negotiators from more than 190 countries attending two weeks of talks in Durban, South Africa that began Nov. 28.


Submission + - Board Game Geek launches iOS Board Games State of (

bcummingsiOS writes: "Hello Readers, Developers, and Board Game Publishers,

In order to provide a clearer picture of the board game app industry and its trends, we conducted a survey of board game app developers for Quarter 3, 2011. The results of this survey can be found in the iOS Board Games State of the Industry Report. It takes a look at the trends and state of the industry. This report is 17 pages in length and paints a good picture of the board game app industry. It contains charts and figures that show a breakdown of the metrics for the industry. Thank you to all developers who responded to our survey, which made this report possible.

You can read the report below or view a PDF here:

In addition, we have created the iOS Board Games Best Practices Report aimed at developers, board game publishers, and industry professionals. The iOS Board Games Best Practices Report contains nearly 40 pages of additional content, featuring breakdowns, charts, and analyses of the best practices and choices when developing iOS board game apps. This document will be a key in understanding and implementing correct decisions in iOS board game apps.

This initial Best Practices report can be purchased by going here:

We are excited to have finally completed this massive undertaking and we hope that developers and users will find this information interesting and useful. Also if you are a developer and interested in us taking a closer look at your app in particular and how it compares to the market in general, as well as provide advice for improvement, feel free to contact us at

Thank you all and I hope you enjoy the report,

Bradley Cummings
iOS Board Games"

Submission + - Targeted attacks steal credit cards from hospitali (

Em Adespoton writes: "SophosLabs, the security research division of Sophos, Inc, has been tracking an increase in targeted attacks against hospitality and educational organizations. Active malware has been discovered that steals credit card data directly from memory for later retrieval by the criminals involved. This activity appears to go back as far as 2009, just like the Stuxnet/Duqu threat."

Submission + - Tiny guided bomb for tiny planes (

garymortimer writes: "Coming soon, one man target, one air dropped bomb. Drones get smaller weapons.

STM Phase II is a new 12-pound, 22-inch long, precision-guided, gravity-dropped bomb specifically designed for employment from manned and unmanned aircraft systems. Has both GPS and semiactive laser guidance"

Submission + - Free Apps to Turn Your iPhone into a Mobile Office ( 1

MikeCapone writes: "For many professionals, tending to business while on vacation is a requirement. But don'(TM)t let that reality derail your trip. These days, you can do everything from scanning and signing documents to sending hands-free texts while driving--"all from your iPhone. We’ve rounded up the best office apps that let you take your show on the road, so you can spend more time sunbathing, and less time searching for the nearest fax machine. Did we mention that they're all free?"

Submission + - Stephen Wolfram Bets on Singularity (

kodiaktau writes: This week the Lifeboat foundation announced that Stephen Wolfram would be joining its organization. The purpose of the group is to think through scientific solutions to existential problems that might be used to save humanity from such risks as asteroids hitting the earth or some other diabolical disaster. Wolfram brings computational science to the table and has posited that the earth and universe can be understood as a computer program that can be significantly altered as we continue to advance in technology.

Comment Re:Reminds me of those Magic Eye pictures (Score 1) 495

And those are ridiculously easy once you get the trick. The first ones that were out, I remember, hit in the very early 90's in magazines like Popular Science. In those, you had two dots right above the picture, and the instructions were to visually split the dots and combine them in such a way there were now three. That achieved, look down at the picture.

Most, if not all of the later ones removed those instructions, and it became a game of "stare at this until you get it." For the really old-timers, we understood the real trick is to cross your eyes slightly and vary the degree until you hit the magic separation necessary to resolve the picture.

I'm not entirely convinced the effects are related to those used for 3D movies, since Magic Eye works through the transposition created by overlapping the two visual fields by crossing your eyes.

To restore a sense of reality, I think Walt Disney should have a Hardluckland. -- Jack Paar