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Comment: Re:Space Czar (Score 2) 59

by cheesybagel (#49308443) Attached to: Report: NASA May Miss SLS Launch Deadline

Well they can also do three Falcon 9 launches with the same amount of cores for a single Heavy which I expect gives them a lot more profit for roughly the same amount of manufacturing work.

It also helps clear their launch backlog and build a customer base. So it is not unreasonable that spend the first one or two years just doing Falcon 9 launches.

Comment: Re:budget (Score 1) 59

by cheesybagel (#49306663) Attached to: Report: NASA May Miss SLS Launch Deadline

The article explains it fairly well. The SLS organization is a disaster. Not that this is unexpected.

NASA’s Office of Inspector General warned that Ground Systems Development and Operations, or GSDO, may be hard-pressed to have Kennedy Space Center's launch facilities ready on time. ...
"GSDO cannot finalize and complete its requirements without substantial input for the other two programs," said Jim Morrison, the assistant inspector general for audits. "And NASA is still finalizing the requirements for those programs."

In other words the pad work is delayed because they haven't finished the rocket design yet. And this is like 3 years before the launch.

Historically, said the OIG, NASA has taken a more centralized approach to the management of its in-house launch programs, synchronizing development activities through a single contractor. This is not the case for SLS, Orion and GSDO—each program is managed independently, with an emphasis placed on cross-program coordination. The OIG believes this approach is inefficient and could lead to scheduling delays.

I suggest NASA reads this paper:
Bayer, Martin. "Hermes- Lessons learnt." IAF, International Astronautical Congress, 45 th, Jerusalem, Israel. 1994.

Comment: Re:Commercially makes sense ... maybe (Score 1) 148

by cheesybagel (#49306487) Attached to: Apple May Start Accepting Android Phones As Trade-Ins

Lately there has been a backlash against outsourcing in several fields. It may just happen that Apple's strategy is going to bite them in the end.

Samsung is like the world's #2 semiconductor manufacturer. They used to produce low quality products at low prices before they changed to a high-quality strategy in the 90s. They are no stranger to mass production of dirt cheap products at razor thin margins. That's how they got to where they are in semiconductors after all. The Koreans basically wiped everyone else out of that market, which has cut-throat pricing, including Intel and the Japanese. The idea is to leverage high quality semiconductors and other components across their entire product line.

Apple, IMO, relies on product design and marketing to keep a hold of their market but I think they are holding something really thin indeed. They have already felt the pinch when the decided to switch their CPU manufacturing from Samsung to TSMC and TSMC failed to deliver them in the latest generation processes. There are just some things you cannot easily outsource without losing a quality edge. Apple is no stranger to a situation like this, they did keep their loyal fan base during the G5 fiasco, but not everyone is that gullible.

Comment: Re:Commercially makes sense ... maybe (Score 1) 148

by cheesybagel (#49303419) Attached to: Apple May Start Accepting Android Phones As Trade-Ins

Or it may just be that Samsung spends large amounts of money on things like factories and process R&D which they need to keep at full capacity and at some profit in order to sustain their business model. It's not like they're Apple who has basically no manufacturing capability whatsoever.

Comment: Re:Sounds like it's time... (Score 1) 136

by cheesybagel (#49294695) Attached to: The Pirate Party Now the Biggest Party In Iceland

The difference is this isn't brutal austerity imposed from abroad but normal austerity cause by local conditions.

Yes a lot of people are stuck with expensive mortgages that they are finding hard to pay. The same thing is happening elsewhere with the added issue that even those people who didn't contract any debt in the first place are being forced to pay someone else's debts.

The banks shouldn't have given easy credit that they knew people couldn't pay. Of course this will lead to foreclosures and bankruptcies but the sooner they admit to the problem and start solving it the sooner the problem will end.

Comment: Re:Sounds like it's time... (Score 1) 136

by cheesybagel (#49294619) Attached to: The Pirate Party Now the Biggest Party In Iceland

We had something similar happen here where a bank was offering a lot higher rates on deposits than anyone else. Guess why. They needed live cash to paper over their financial black hole. The bank went bankrupt shortly afterwards.

You know what? If an investment or application sounds too good to be true it probably isn't.

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