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Comment: A cobbler should stick to his last (Score 5, Informative) 776

IAAESS (I am an energy system scientist).

These are four of the most prominent *climate* scientists in the world. But not one of them has published a single paper on energy systems (as far as I can see in their online lists of publications). There is a whole field of science concerning integration of intermittent renewables, and these guys have never demonstrated any expertise in this area.

I'm sure all four of them get extremely annoyed when scientists in fields completely unrelated to climate change spout climate skeptic nonsense all over the media (I do too). Now they are guilty of the exact same sin.

Comment: Re:The girl you should've asked to prom... (Score 1) 117

The day Steve Jobs stood in front of a room and introduced the Iphone EVERYONE knew this was a game changer. "Today we're going to introduce a new iPod, a phone, and world class web device" As he repeated that line the graphics on the screen merged and the room realized the leaks about three new products were instead one new device. It was a hell of a mis-direction. It wasn't "the mother of all demos" but it was a close second.

The day Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone EVERYONE already knew that he was going to announce it. There was no misdirection involved.

But granted, three new devices all-in-one-package was a clever spin.

Republicans

+ - Project Orca: How an IT disaster destroyed Republicans get-out-the-vote effort-> 4

Submitted by cheesecake23
cheesecake23 (1110663) writes "Many talking heads have attributed Obama's success to an unmatched "ground game". Now, inside reports from campaign volunteers suggest that Project Orca, a republican tech-based voter monitoring effort with 37000 volunteers in swing states, turned out to be an epic failure due to dismal IT. Problems ranged from state-wide incorrect PINs, to misleading and lately distributed information packets to volunteers, a server outage and missing redirection of secure URLs."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Church and Einstein (Score 5, Informative) 414

by cheesecake23 (#41655303) Attached to: Einstein Letter Critical of Religion To Be Auctioned On EBay

Einstein was wrong about this one, if it is in fact an authentic Einstein quote. Can someone please verify for me?

Here is an apparently honest attempt at verification by a math professor who put a lot of effort into sourcing the quote in 2006. He concludes that it is probably not authentic.

HOWEVER, in 2008, a woman brought a series of letters to an episode of Antiques Roadshow. Apparently her father had also attempted to source the quote. Her father finally received a letter from Einstein himself:

"It's true that I made a statement which corresponds approximately with the text you quoted. I made this statement during the first years of the Nazi regime-- much earlier than 1940-- and my expressions were a little more moderate."

Comment: Re:this whole story is just sad... (Score 1) 533

just make prostitution legal (and regulated) like most of Europe.

To qualify that statement: prostitution is legal in most of Europe, but it is only regulated in a few countries. See this map.

In my opinion, the most interesting system is in Sweden, Norway and Iceland. In these countries, buying sex is illegal, but selling sex is not. The idea is to not criminalize the prostitutes who are already in a vulnerable position and may have ended up where they are by unfortunate social circumstances, but still provide a strong deterrent for the buyers.

+ - Einstein letter calling Bible "pretty childish" to be auctioned on eBay->

Submitted by cheesecake23
cheesecake23 (1110663) writes "In an admirably concise piece in The Atlantic, Rebecca J. Rosen summarizes Einstein's subtle views on religion and profound respect for the inexplicable, along with the news that a letter handwritten by the legendary scientist that describes the Bible as a 'collection of honorable, but still primitive legends' and 'pretty childish' will be auctioned off on eBay over the next two weeks. Bidding will begin at $3 million."
Link to Original Source

+ - Semantic v. SfY->

Submitted by dgharmon
dgharmon (2564621) writes "A brief recap: In March, I wrote about a lawsuit that posed a threat to my daughter’s voice. Maya, who is four years old and unable to speak, uses an app called Speak for Yourself (SfY) to communicate, and the creators of SfY were being sued for patent infringement by Prentke Romich Company (PRC) and Semantic Compaction Systems (Semantic), two much larger companies that make designated communication devices (not iPad apps)

"In connection with the settlement, Semantic has agreed to grant a non-exclusive license as to two of Semantic’s patents, i.e., U.S. Patent Nos. 5,748,177 and 5,920,303"

"A dynamic keyboard includes a plurality of keys, each with an associated symbol, which are dynamically redefinable to provide access to higher level keyboards", U.S. Patent No. 5,748,177

"An apparatus, comprising: integrated input and display device for displaying a plurality of keys of a displayed keyboard", U.S. Patent No 5,920,303"

Link to Original Source

"Kill the Wabbit, Kill the Wabbit, Kill the Wabbit!" -- Looney Tunes, "What's Opera Doc?" (1957, Chuck Jones)

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