Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Role Playing (Games)

Blizzard Launches Third WoW Expansion, Cataclysm 218

Posted by Soulskill
from the resetting-the-treadmill dept.
Last night marked the launch of Cataclysm, the third expansion for Blizzard's World of Warcraft. Cataclysm includes: two new races, both of which have their own starting zones; five new high-level zones that span the new 80-85 leveling content; seven new five-man dungeons (plus two heroic versions of classic dungeons); three end-game raids; a new profession; two new PvP battlegrounds; and one world PvP zone. In addition, Cataclysm features a revamp of Azeroth, the portion of the game world that went live when WoW originally launched in 2004, providing a much improved leveling experience for new players and alts. MMO-Champion posted a comprehensive collection of information about the new content. Of course, Cataclysm's launch has brought the video game addiction debate back to the fore.
Google

Russian Regulators Block Google Online Advertising Acquisition 120

Posted by timothy
from the lots-of-money-to-be-cadged-yet dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Russian regulators will not let Google buy a local online advertising company, halting a $140 million deal agreed to in July. Google had planned to acquire Zao Begun, which has a search and contextual video and text advertising business. Begun is owned by Rambler Media, a Russian company that own various Web sites and runs a search engine. Google said it is reviewing the decision of Russia's Federal Antimonopoly Service (FAS) and hasn't decided how to react. Slashdot has previously covered some of the issues surrounding Google's muscle in the advertising market."
Graphics

Getting Away With a Cheap Graphics Card 290

Posted by timothy
from the time-value-of-money dept.
theraindog writes "High-end graphics cards get all the glory, but most folks have a difficult time justifying $300 or more for a single PC component. But what if you could get reasonable performance in all the latest games from a budget card costing as little as $70? With game developers targeting the relatively modest hardware available in current consoles and trickle-down bringing cutting-edge features down to budget price points, today's low-end graphics cards are more capable than ever. To find out which one offers the best value proposition, The Tech Report has rounded up eight graphics cards between $70 and $170, comparing their game performance, Blu-ray playback acceleration, noise levels, and power consumption, with interesting results."

Comment: Tax payer funded patents (Score 0, Redundant) 224

by chasingsol (#25016809) Attached to: NASA Patents To Be Auctioned
Wait a second. Wasn't it my taxes that paid for the research that led to those patents? They should release the patents to the public that paid for them. I can understand wanting to raise funds, but not if it means that the patents will end up being abused by some random patent troll to stifle innovation.
The Internet

Demonoid Tracker Is Back Online 211

Posted by kdawson
from the score-one-for-the-mole dept.
Crymson4 writes "We discussed the shutdown of the Demonoid torrent tracker last fall. For those who don't already know, Demonoid is back up. Looks like they found a new host for the Web site and the tracker is functioning properly as well. For those with old accounts, all the old data has been saved. It's almost as if they never left."
The Internet

+ - Large Hadron Collider gears up for Huge Data Flows 1

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens
Hugh Pickens writes "Live Science has an interesting story on the flood of information that will pour from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's next-generation particle accelerator, an underground ring 27 kilometers around located at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, starting in mid-2008. Detectors stationed around the LHC ring will produce 15 trillion gigabytes of data every year, data that will be farmed out to computing centers worldwide. In the LHC computing model, data from the experiments will flow through tiers. The Tier 0 center at CERN takes the data directly from the experiments, stores a copy and sends it to Tier 1 sites. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment has seven Tier 1 sites in seven nations, and each site partitions its portion of the data based on the types of particles detected and sends these sub-samples off to one of the 30 CMS Tier 2 sites where researchers and students finally get their hands on the data. "We are really good at moving data from Fermilab to our Tier 2 center," says physicist Ken Bloom at the University of Nebaska where scientists have achieved the fastest rates for any Tier 1-to-Tier 2 connection worldwide. "We can manage a terabyte an hour easily, and a terabyte in half an hour is possible.""
Software

+ - Orrin Hatch - Software copyright violater-> 2

Submitted by
fudreporter
fudreporter writes "Wired.com has an article referring to comments Senator Orrin Hatch(R-Utah) made about downloading copyrighted material from the Internet... Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) suggested Tuesday that people who download copyright materials from the Internet should have their computers automatically destroyed. But Hatch himself is using unlicensed software on his official website, which presumably would qualify his computer to be smoked by the system he proposes. The senator's site makes extensive use of a JavaScript menu system developed by Milonic Solutions, a software company based in the United Kingdom. The copyright-protected code has not been licensed for use on Hatch's website. "It's an unlicensed copy," said Andy Woolley, who runs Milonic. "It's very unfortunate for him because of those comments he made.""
Link to Original Source

Often statistics are used as a drunken man uses lampposts -- for support rather than illumination.

Working...