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Firefighters Let House Burn Because Owner Didn't Pay Fee 2058 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the deadly-serious-homeowner's-association dept.
Dthief writes "From MSNBC: 'Firefighters in rural Tennessee let a home burn to the ground last week because the homeowner hadn't paid a $75 fee. Gene Cranick of Obion County and his family lost all of their possessions in the Sept. 29 fire, along with three dogs and a cat. "They could have been saved if they had put water on it, but they didn't do it," Cranick told MSNBC's Keith Olbermann. The fire started when the Cranicks' grandson was burning trash near the family home. As it grew out of control, the Cranicks called 911, but the fire department from the nearby city of South Fulton would not respond.'"
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OH Senate Passes Bill Banning Human-Animal Hybrids 197 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the no-centaurs-allowed dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The sci-fi movie Splice seems to have scared the Ohio's State Senator Steve Buehrer. The Ohio Senate has passed Sen. Buehrer's bill banning 'the creation, transportation, or receipt of a human-animal hybrid, the transfer of a nonhuman embryo into a human womb, and the transfer of a human embryo into a nonhuman womb.' So much for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles."
Businesses

Failed Games That Damaged Or Killed Their Companies 397

Posted by Soulskill
from the cause-or-symptom dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Develop has an excellent piece up profiling a bunch of average to awful titles that flopped so hard they harmed or sunk their studio or publisher. The list includes Haze, Enter The Matrix, Hellgate: London, Daikatana, Tabula Rasa, and — of course — Duke Nukem Forever. 'Daikatana was finally released in June 2000, over two and a half years late. Gamers weren't convinced the wait was worth it. A buggy game with sidekicks (touted as an innovation) who more often caused you hindrance than helped ... achieved an average rating of 53. By this time, Eidos is believed to have invested over $25 million in the studio. And they called it a day. Eidos closed the Dallas Ion Storm office in 2001.'"
AMD

+ - The Gigahertz Race is Back on

Submitted by
Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward writes "When CPU manufacturers ran up against the power wall in their designs, they announced that "the Gigahertz race is over; future products will run at slower clock speeds and gain performance through the use of multiple cores and other techniques that won't improve single-threaded application performance." Well, it seems that the gigahertz race is back on — This CNET story talks about how AMD has boosted the speed of their new Opterons to 3GHz. Of course, it the new chips also consume better than 20% more power than their last batch. The real question is: "What happens when they approach 4GHz this time?""
User Journal

Journal: Stress in the best of times

Journal by chancycat

Monday, 26 March 2007: ironic how good news can be stressful. After a year+ being dedicated to a new business group, I'm now offered a non-IT / in-the-business role in another group (led by my old managers) nearby (same corporation). The promise is to be no longer on-loan from corp-IT, but to be really *in* the business. So now, today, I am being offered an in-the-business job by the business I've been with this past year. Yay: happy escape from IT and its invent-absence philosophies, but str

Comment: HP's got that today too - priced for corporate use (Score 1) 291

by chancycat (#18447073) Attached to: New Inkjet Technology 5 To 10 Times Faster
HP's got ink-based page-wide printing today: priced for the enterprise though. Scaling it down for home and small-office use is under development I am sure. Reliability is a challenge when price is a priority.

http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/feature_stories/ 2006/06edgeline.html

Dell Issues Laptop Battery Recall 170

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the seat-warmers dept.
zoogies writes "The New York Times is reporting that Dell is now issuing a laptop battery recall — for notebooks sold between April 2004 and July 18, 2006. According to the article, 'The recalled batteries were used in 2.7 million computers sold in the United States and 1.4 million sold overseas. The total is about 18 percent of Dell's notebook production during the period in question.' This seems to go along with a June Slashdot story on an exploding Dell laptop, and a July Slashdot story on a Dell investigation into its exploding laptops. Curiously, there is nothing yet on Dell Support's product recall page about this latest recall."

Has Steve Jobs Lost His Magic? 432

Posted by Zonk
from the get-more-pixie-dust dept.
TimAbdulla writes to mention a Wired article wondering if Steve Jobs has lost his magic? The keynote yesterday, author Leander Kahney says, was the most uninspiring he's yet seen out of the usually charismatic man. Accompanied by other folks from within the company, Kahney wonders what lackluster showings like this will mean for the company after Jobs steps down. From the article: "Looking very thin, almost gaunt, Jobs used the 90-minute presentation to introduce a new desktop Mac and preview the next version of Apple's operating system, code-named Leopard. The sneak preview of Leopard was underwhelming. For what seemed an interminable time, Jobs and Co. showed off one yawn after another. There's no way I can get excited about virtual desktops or a new service that turns highlighted text into a 'to do' item. Oooo."

Swimsuit Design Uses Supercomputing 253

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the go-with-the-flow dept.
Roland Piquepaille writes "These days, most competitive swimmers wear some type of body suit to reduce high skin-friction drag from water. And makers of swimwear are already busy working on new models for the Olympics 2008. According to Textile & Apparel, Speedo is even using a supercomputer to refine its designs. Its engineers run Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program on an SGI Altix system."

Wind Powered Freighters Return 261

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the more-than-just-hot-air dept.
thatoneguyfromphoeni writes "It appears that sails could return to the ocean's freighters soon. Newsweek is reporting on a technology to assist with cross-ocean travel. From the article: 'SkySails' system consists of an enormous towing kite and navigation software that can map the best route between two points for maximum wind efficiency. In development for more than four years, the system costs from roughly $380,000 to $3.2 million, depending on the size of the ship it's pulling. SkySails claims it will save one third of fuel costs.'"

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