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+ - NSA data center front and center in debate over liberty, security and privacy->

Submitted by chamilto0516
chamilto0516 (675640) writes "Twenty-five miles due south of Salt Lake City, a massive construction project is nearing completion. The heavily secured site belongs to the National Security Agency.
"The spy center" — that's what some of the locals like Jasmine Widmer, who works at Bluffdale's sandwich shop, told our Fox News team as part of an eight month investigation into data collection and privacy rights that will be broadcast Sunday at 9 p.m. ET called "Fox News Reporting: Your Secrets Out.”
The NSA says the Utah Data Center is a facility for the intelligence community that will have a major focus on cyber security. The agency will neither confirm nor deny specifics. Some published reports suggest it could hold 5 zettabytes of data. (Just one zettabyte is the equivalent of about 62 billion stacked iPhones 5's-- that stretches past the moon."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Sad by understandable (Score 5, Insightful) 127

by chamilto0516 (#29655429) Attached to: Thawte Will End "Web of Trust" On November 16
This saddens me but I understand it. Adoption of PKI for email in this multi-standard, multi-client fashion was just too difficult for the average email user. Yes, I usually have one or two accounts for secure messaging and I do use Thawte (I am a Notary) but it just doesn't work for most unless there is someone to walk them through. As much as I am aggravated by Lotus Notes, they self contained system (part of my aggravation) was able to pull this off 10 years ago and is still really the only app that I have seen do PKI well. Unfortunately it doesn't do a lot of other things very well.
Games

The Right Amount of "Challenge" In IT & Gaming 103

Posted by Soulskill
from the inversely-proportional dept.
boyko.at.netqos writes "In an essay entitled 'An Epiphany I Had While Playing Pac-Man,' the author talks about how smart people need to find a certain amount of intellectual challenge from day to day. If they don't find it in their workplace, they'll end up playing complex, 'smart' games, like Civilization IV or Chess — and if they do find it in their workplace, they're more likely to sit down with a nice game of Pac-Man, Katamari Damacy, or Peggle. Quoting: 'When I look back on my life, and I compare the times in my life when I was playing simple games compared to the times in my life when I was playing complex ones, a pattern emerges. The more complexity and mental stimulation I was getting from other activities — usually my day job at the time — the less I needed mental stimulation in my free time. Conversely, in times when I was working boring jobs, I'd be playing games that required a lot of thinking and mental gymnastics.' The author then goes on to speculate that some IT workers might subconsciously be giving themselves more challenges by choosing to deal with difficult problems, rather than performing simple (but boring) preventative maintenance and proactive network management."
Math

+ - Math Awareness Month 2008 is on Voting->

Submitted by
chamilto0516
chamilto0516 writes "No politics here, just mathematics: One of the surprising aspects of voting that we learn from mathematics is that the outcome of an election may more accurately reflect the voting method rather than the voters' wishes. To illustrate this phenomena, we provide you with the opportunity to vote from among a set of presidential candidates using three different methods. Method 1 is the traditional voting system, in which you simply select your favorite candidate. Just one candidate, no more. In method 2, you vote for all of the candidates you would consider acceptable, as many or as few as you wish. In method 3, you rank the candidates from most preferred to least, and points are assigned accordingly. After you vote, you will see the status of this "election" up through and including your vote. If the "winner" is different using one or more methods, don't be surprised."
Link to Original Source
The Internet

Journal: Mouseovers - as bad as popups? 8

Journal by fyngyrz

Is anyone else as annoyed as I am by words and phrases in web articles that pop up boxes because my mouse pointer happened to cross them, temporarily hiding the content I was reading in the first place? I didn't click on anything, and consequently, I don't want a context change. I find these annoying to the point of noting what the site is and not going back. Anyone else feel the same? Anyone have a defense of the practice?

Comment: Re:More or less (Score 1) 3

by chamilto0516 (#18438179) Attached to: Terminal Server References? Anyone?
I do see what you mean. I started pricing the smaller motherboards, tiny cases (around the size of the Mac mini), memory and displays. Displays and memory are the same prices and I didn't feel the need to factor in keyboards and mice. My suprise was the motherboards and cases were the real victims of what you talk about in your response. They are the ones that throw it askew. If I got a regular motherboard and case then I am a hard drive away from a standard PC.
United States

+ - US copying laptop hard disks+password upon entry

Submitted by
Flo
Flo writes "According to Fefe, a German blogger, U.S. officials copy hard disks of laptops upon entry. They even insist on the disclosure of passwords so they can decrypt files. Allegedly they even take people into coercive detention to retrieve the passwords. Fefe's sources are one member of the (German) Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) and one employee of SAP. He also claims to have received confirmation for this from "two other large companies"."
Censorship

Copyright Law Used to Shut Down Site 206

Posted by Hemos
from the bad-usage dept.
driptray writes "The Sydney Morning Herald reports that an Australian mining industry group has used copyright laws to close a website that parodied a coal industry ad campaign. A group known as Rising Tide created the website using the slogan "Rising sea levels: brought to you by mining" in response to the mining industry's slogan of "Life: brought to you by mining". The mining industry claimed that the "content and layout" of the parody site infringed copyright, but when Rising Tide removed the copyrighted photos and changed the layout, the mining industry still lodged a complaint. Is this a misuse of copyright law in order to stifle dissent?"
Businesses

+ - Using the Web to Get the Boss to Pay More

Submitted by
Arun Jacob
Arun Jacob writes "The NYT has an interesting article — Using the Web to Get the Boss to Pay More — on online tools that can help in salary negotiations. Link here (Free registration required).

To summarise, the article talks about the websites that provide information on standard compensation packages for your position and role. Using this information, it should be easier to negotiate your pay with a fact-based approach rather than "feelings-based" approach. The sites profiled are —
Salary.com (Data available only for US)
Payscale.com (International)"
Software

+ - US Air finds database hard to swallow!

Submitted by bbsguru
bbsguru (586178) writes "Anyone who has ever tried to combine two IT departments following a takeover or merger knows a version of this story:

The 2005 merger of US Air and West Holdings Group finally got to the point of combining flight reservations systems, with calamitous results.

FTA: "US Airways' kiosks at Charlotte and four regional hubs couldn't communicate with the reservation network for several hours after the systems were unified as part of a 2005 merger of the two airlines, causing lines and missed flights.""
Power

+ - Free Solar coming soon or is CitizenRE vaporware?

Submitted by AmericanInKiev
AmericanInKiev (453362) writes "CitizenRE is a new Multi-level-marketing concept (or Pyramid Scheme depending on the reader) which promises to install Solar Energy on your roof for FREE. In short you agree to pay the same price for energy as today, and CitizenRE will install a solar system on a rental basis. If this sounds too good to be true, bear in mind they have over 7,000 "customers", 700 "affiliates", but have so far failed to install even a single system. Is this celebrity-backed pyramid scheme the "Moses" that will lead the chosen ones to the promised land and free them from the bonds of evil energy companies and solar installers? or does CitizenRE mark the entrance of faith-based solutions to mitigate the collective guilt of fossil fuel. You decide."

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