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Submission + - Tiny cores are here, and they change programming ( 3

An anonymous reader writes: Intel is returning to in-order cores after two decades with Atom and Knights. ARM is already building in-order cores for iPhones, iPads, and Androids. IBM has switched to in-order cores after building generations of out-of-order cores. This indicates a clear trend that in-order cores are back in the mainstream. Highlighting the performance characteristics of in-order and out-of-order cores, Dr. Aater Suleman's article explains why programming for in-order cores is very different from programming for the now-traditional out-of-order cores. Thus, this new trend requires a change in compilers, tools, and programming techniques. Compilers need to get better at removing useless code and instruction scheduling. Programmers need to weigh new trade-offs and perform classic optimizations that have been forgotten. I liked this article particularly for the very simple code examples and a simple explanation of in-order and out-of-order differences. The message is clear: programmers and compilers need to understand in-order cores and target their code better.
Open Source

Linux 2.6.36 Released 238

diegocg writes "Version 2.6.36 of the Linux kernel has been released. This version includes support for the Tilera architecture, a new filesystem notification interface called fanotify, CIFS local caching, support for Intel Intelligent Power Sharing in i3/5 systems, integration of the kernel debugger and KMS, inclusion of the AppArmor security system, a redesign of workqueues optimized for concurrency, and several new drivers and small improvements. See the full changelog here for more details."

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