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Comment: Re:Well. (Score 1) 193

by ceoyoyo (#46823361) Attached to: How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

Sure it does. The rubber doesn't have to be exposed. IIRC the 3 and 3G did have a rubber buffer between the case and the class. The metal antenna/bezel on the 4 and 4s wee an okay shock absorber but the glass stuck out too far on either side. On the 5 and 5s the glass is lower profile and more protected.

I got a scratch on my phone the first day I had it. Then I dropped it (quite a few times, the last time cracked the glass when it fell face down on gravel) and got it replaced under warranty. So I guess my experience has been even. A quick survey shows a few scratches and a few smashed screens on the phones near me - it looks pretty even. But the smashed screens are much more noticeable, of course.

Apple has used gorilla glass to this point. They're investing in sapphire, presumably to make screen covers with. They're not stupid. Presumably they know something.

Comment: Re:"Fully Half Doubt the Big Bang"? (Score 1) 566

by ceoyoyo (#46820839) Attached to: The US Public's Erratic Acceptance of Science

Ah, are you one of the crappy scientists? People in my lab make their hypotheses before they test them. Perhaps because I won't help them process or analyze the data without one. Good scientists through history have done the same.

Cynicism is very hip these days though. Congratulations.

Comment: Re:Healthy to question authority (Score 2) 566

by ceoyoyo (#46820307) Attached to: The US Public's Erratic Acceptance of Science

The problem is that people aren't questioning "authority" in the form of celebrities with no qualifications at all, and are unreasonably questioning authority, in the form of people who have spent decades training and studying the things they're talking about.

By unreasonably questioning I don't mean skepticism, I mean unshakeable disbelief.

Comment: Re:Experimental science vs narrative science (Score 1) 566

by ceoyoyo (#46820277) Attached to: The US Public's Erratic Acceptance of Science

Unfortunately, you made up that dichotomy.

The scientific method can never prove anything is true. In science, there really isn't any concept of "true." Cigarettes cause cancer. Do they? It's a good theory. It works very well. It has a good amount of predictive power, good mechanistic support, lots of data supporting it. But it could be false.

Manmade global warming is a good theory. It looks like it works pretty well. It has some predictive power, although we're still testing that. There's good mechanistic support. Quite a bit of data. It could be false though.

There's none of this historical science / "because X and Y are true, it makes sense that Z is true" / etc. crap.

Comment: Re:It's a design problem, not materials. (Score 2) 193

by ceoyoyo (#46820183) Attached to: How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

That's because the other phones don't continue to function after their screens get broken. :P

I've actually broken a couple of iPhone screens. They seem to survive the corner and edge drops just fine, but the face down drops onto concrete or an uneven stone floor breaks the screen. Still works fine though, which is impressive.

Comment: Re:Well. (Score 3, Insightful) 193

by ceoyoyo (#46820079) Attached to: How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

Sapphire is almost certainly more scratch resistant, because it's harder. Gorilla glass may well be less likely to break, since it's not as hard. Scratch and break resistance are usually difficult to get together. You're right, the real question is, in the real world, which is the more important property? Are scratches or breaks more common? Can other design features mitigate scratches or breaks more effectively?

I would think some rubber buffer around the glass could be used to add a lot of break resistance. Other than putting a film over the screen, scratches are pretty hard to prevent without making the surface itself more resistant.

Man is the best computer we can put aboard a spacecraft ... and the only one that can be mass produced with unskilled labor. -- Wernher von Braun

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