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Comment: Oh Microsoft, oh Microsoft.. (Score 1) 742

by Jeremy Allison - Sam (#46326529) Attached to: "Microsoft Killed My Pappy"

"Guys, I know we've been punching you in the face for 20+ years but we've *stopped* now !
Why don't you love us ?"

As someone who works very well with Microsoft these days and has many friends there, the lack of self-awareness in the posts on the article is staggering :-).

You have to do more than stopping being bad. Being *good* is required. :-).

I know you can do it ! Stop being a patent troll for starters.

+ - Hacker Public Radio audio interview with Jeremy Allison @ FOSDEM.->

Submitted by Jeremy Allison - Sam
Jeremy Allison - Sam (8157) writes "Here's a (long:-) interview that Ken Fallon of Hacker Public Radio did with me at FOSDEM. Covers a variety of subjects, from the Sinclair QL interview with Linus to how Samba got started (and how to steal programming time from your employer :-), to the Microsoft/EU lawsuit !"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Heaven (Score 1) 420

by Jeremy Allison - Sam (#45980093) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Suggestions For a Simple Media Server?

The thing you have to understand is that this isn't a technical problem.

All of these things are well understood, and there are Free Software libraries that will do all of these things (indeed the proprietary commercial solutions are often built with these very self-same libraries).

No, this is a *legal* problem, with patents on software destroying the opportunity to create many wonderful things that consumers would love to buy, if the legal framework allowed it, which it doesn't.

It's almost unimaginable how much damage one simple thing (allowing patents on software) has done to the industry.

Comment: Happened to us too (Score 3, Interesting) 133

by mattbee (#45873829) Attached to: UK Company Successfully Claims Ownership of "Pinterest" Trademark

A US startup called "Bytemark" started trading in the UK (my hosting company has been around since 2002). Like an idiot I asked them to please change their name because it could cause some confusion. Until then I'd not considered trademark issues, and we finally filed for a trademark of our own. Of course they filed 2 weeks before us, after I'd sent my polite request. So 2 years and about £20,000 later (only finished just last month) we defeated their objection to our trademark at a hearing, and the trademark office gave us full rights over the name. If it hadn't gone that way we could have been harassed into changing our 10-year old brand name, especially if we'd gone into any new areas of business.

My takeaway from that is that if I start another business I'll take on registration of the UK, EU & possibly US trademark as a given before launching. But when you're just starting out, it is (at best) thousands of pounds that could really be put to better use.

Privacy

Swarm Mobile's Offer: Free Wi-Fi In Exchange For Some Privacy 121

Posted by timothy
from the tradeoffs-tradeoffs dept.
cagraham writes "Startup Swarm Mobile intends to help physical retailers counter online shopping habits by collecting data on their customer's actions. Swarm's platform integrates with store's Wifi networks in order to monitor what exactly customers are doing while shopping. In exchange for collecting analytics, shoppers get access to free internet. Swarm then send reports to the store owners, detailing how many customers checked prices online, or compared rival products on their phones. Their platform also allows stores to directly send discount codes or coupons to shopper's phones."
Network

Researcher Shows How GPUs Make Terrific Network Monitors 67

Posted by samzenpus
from the keeping-an-eye-on-things dept.
alphadogg writes "A network researcher at the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has found a potential new use for graphics processing units — capturing data about network traffic in real time. GPU-based network monitors could be uniquely qualified to keep pace with all the traffic flowing through networks running at 10Gbps or more, said Fermilab's Wenji Wu. Wenji presented his work as part of a poster series of new research at the SC 2013 supercomputing conference this week in Denver."

Comment: Amazon's competitors still leaving an open goal (Score 1) 258

by mattbee (#45251847) Attached to: Why Amazon Is Profitless Only By Choice

So here are two experiences that made me think "screw this, I wish I'd shopped at Amazon". This may just be a UK-specfic experience, but...

1) Samsung Series 9 laptop from PC World, bought from their store in April, came with Windows 8 drivers (I think) that just never worked. Mouse pointer jerking around, it blue-screened within 5 minutes on one boot out of every two. I updated its drivers through Windows, through the Samsung driver update utility ... just hopeless. I tried to use it for about a month, trying to avoid reboots, but eventually gave up and took it back to the shop. Their nice assistant agreed it looked screwed, took it back, and after two phone calls their support people said that because I hadn't made a restore disc, they couldn't / wouldn't do anything with it, and it must have been my negligence that broke it. I am taking them to court for the £900 purchase price to get a refund, after I'd bought a different model ... at Amazon.

2) Bought a £150 model helicopter for a member of staff as a leaving present from Maplin (big electronics component & gadget store), to be delivered to his house. They make a picking error and deliver a completely different, much cheaper product. I call them and say, hey, you've made a mistake would you mind delivering the correct item. No. I must go over to the recipient's house, pick the item up, drive it to the store before they will acknowledge their mistake and get me what I ordered. They generously offer a freepost address for me to send the item back, but I must be sure to go to the post office and get a certificate of dispatch! [if you've never been to England this generally involves driving into town, queuing, finding it closed for lunch etc.]

I know from for 1) Amazon would take the item back without question, and I'd be confident enough ordering a replacement on the same day, giving me what I want sooner. And for 2) again, I know they would send the right item out without question and tell me to keep the mistake, it's nor worth the restocking fees.

So whenever I hear "Amazon driving retailers out of business" what I really hear is "Amazon showing how it's done by treating customers as honest & impatient, competitors continue to fuck it up". Amazon aren't even the cheapest, or even the easiest web site to find what you want, but I do know that they care about customers getting what they want quickly, and often that's why I'll pay a bit more.

Is this unfair to ALL OTHER retailers? Am I forgetting some intangible Amazon magic here?

Android

+ - Deleted cloud files can be recovered from smartphones, researchers find->

Submitted by
tsamsoniw
tsamsoniw writes "Researchers from the University of Glasgow have discovered that they could fully recover images, audio files, PDFs, and Word documents deleted from Dropbox, Box, and SugarSync, using both an HTC Android smartphone and an iPhone. They created 20 different test files, including Words docs, PDFS, and JPGs, uploaded them via a PC to the various services, and synced the services with the mobile devices. They accessed and manipulated the files in varying ways (e,g accessing them online once, saving them offline), then used a forensics toolkit to attempt to reconstruct files with artifacts saved to the phone."
Link to Original Source
Advertising

Racism In Online Ad Targeting 474

Posted by Soulskill
from the perhaps-profiling-is-a-better-name dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Most of us are familiar with advertisements in online web searching, and by now we've grown accustomed to scrolling past the 'sponsored' results to get to the real responses to our query. And we know the ads are context-sensitive; for example, searching for our favorite Federation Starship will bring up ads for a similarly-named car-rental agency. But now a Harvard University professor has found a more disturbing trend in those contextual ads: racism. 'Sweeney says she has evidence that black identifying names are up to 25 per cent more likely to be served with an arrest-related ad. "There is discrimination in delivery of these ads," she concludes. Sweeney gathered this evidence by collecting over 2000 names that were suggestive of race. For example, first names such as Trevon, Lakisha and Darnell suggest the owner is black while names like Laurie, Brendan and Katie suggest the owner is white. She then entered these plus surnames into Google.com and Reuters.com and examined the ads they returned. Most names generated ads for public records. However, black-identifying names turned out to be much more likely than white-identifying names to generate ads that including the word "arrest" (60 per cent versus 48 per cent).'"

Comment: Re:Windows is more open (Score 3, Interesting) 162

by Jeremy Allison - Sam (#42554971) Attached to: Samba: Less Important Because Windows Is Less Important

They're not going to do that. The director of Windows server development at Microsoft even gave us a quote for the Samba 4 press release.

https://www.samba.org/samba/news/releases/4.0.0.html

For the tl;dr crowd:

"Active Directory is a mainstay of enterprise IT environments, and Microsoft is committed to support for interoperability across platforms," said Thomas Pfenning, director of development, Windows Server. "We are pleased that the documentation and interoperability labs that Microsoft has provided have been key in the development of the Samba 4.0 Active Directory functionality."

Thanks a *lot* Thomas !

Comment: Re:First posting? (Score 4, Informative) 162

by Jeremy Allison - Sam (#42553629) Attached to: Samba: Less Important Because Windows Is Less Important

No, I also know when it was first widely adopted. I was around and shepherded it through that remember. It really took off around 1994 when we had very wide use on SunOS and early Solaris use.

Wider Linux use really didn't start until about until 1996 or so. I remember tridge and I being amazed that making it work on Linux became more important than making it work on SunOS/Solaris/HPUX and other commercial UNIXes.

Jeremy.

God made machine language; all the rest is the work of man.

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