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User Journal

Journal Journal: Edge kinda sucks 2

From a tablet user's perspective, Windows 8.1 had a pretty good version of IE. It was full screen (to see the URL bar/tabs/bookmarks, you had to actually affirmatively ask for them by swiping from the bottom), they made good use of gestures (swipe left and right to move through history, etc), and the browser was... well, IE, not the world's best, but it's fairly efficient, fast, and compatible.

They removed that IE interface in Windows 10 (only the desktop IE remains.) The alternative is supposed to be Edge, but it has no gestures, and is never full screen in the same way.

Worse, Edge seems to kill performance on my tablet. The browser itself only ever seems to take up single digit percentages of CPU but regardless when I start it or have it running the entire tablet grinds to a halt. Close it, and performance goes back to normal. I have no idea why. Given the low CPU usage I wonder if it's just the way it uses the graphics drivers or something similar, but it makes it unusable.

I've switched to Chrome in the meantime, which contrary to early reports and Mozilla's outburst, is actually very easy. Chrome also has the same problems as Edge in terms of not being really full screen, but it doesn't have the performance issues, and it does have the intuitive (and better than trying to hit buttons with a finger) gesture based UI that IE had.

Tablet mode in general seems a step down in Windows 10 from the Windows 8.1 approach. Oh well.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Bernie Sanders 48

Not feeling it. Deeply suspicious. That doesn't mean I'll vote for Hillary - who has electability problems given the vast hoards of people who loath her - but I'm...

Part of it is Obama. Sure, Obama's kinda, in the last few months, turned back into the guy who ran for President in 2008, but he's still not really that person. Obama's job as candidate and President was to teach those uppity liberals that they can whine and/or get as hopeful as they want, the next guy will always be as bad - as terrible even - as the last guy. He succeeded beyond his wildest dreams.

Part of it is Ron Paul. Ron Paul - from the right- got the same kind of "genuine", "honest", "non-establishment", "heartfelt" plaudits as Sanders gets from the left. People supposedly knew him from the beginning, he's always been the real thing according to them. The Ron Paul Newsletter fiasco gave cause for concern on that. Then my professional life intersected with groups that Ron Paul is associated with indirectly, and in one case directly, and it became obvious the man's a huckster, someone who's very carefully cultivated an image designed to appeal to certain groups who'll donate money, subscribe to paid newsletters and podcasts, and so on en-mass. He's actually better at it than, say, Huckabee, who needed to run for President, or Limbaugh, who probably couldn't get it to work without the backing of a radio syndicate.

So I'm kinda cynical these days. He might get my vote in the end anyway, but it may well be a reluctant one, given on the day of the primaries and then forgotten about.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Chronicle: A little kayaking

On Sunday, i wanted to go kayaking at Kensington Metropark, which i've done in the past. I aimed to leave at 3 with a friend for the 20 minute drive, but we got there after 5. Regardless, they weren't renting boats due to high winds. So, off we went to Heavner Canoe & Kayak Rental, instead, which was on the way, and he had wanted to go to anyway. Specifically, Heavner is a route, we you go and come back or can be picked up. Kensington's Kent lake is just that, a lake.

We got there just after 6 and waited in line for a a few minutes. While that was going on, we reviewed prices and i used the outhouse for a moment. Unlike Kensington which has regular restrooms, Heavner has what seemed to be a plywood shack housing a toilet covering a hole in the ground. Nothing like the good outdoors. There was a man outside waiting for his son, making me comment "oh, there's a line," to which he responded, "there's always a line." At which point his son came out and they both left. After a minute or so, someone else tried the locked door and kept banging. I told him just a moment, and when i came out he apologized. I don't understand people.

Sticker shock then hit. At Kensington, it's $8/hour for a kayak, or $9 for a 2 person. At Heavner, all boats were $24/hour. We had about 45 minutes, so we took a 2 person kayak, knowing full well it'd be hard.

We must've pushed off at about 6:15, though in my mind it was still 6. We took a short oar and i long oar, i took front, as he is better than me, so him seeing me seemed better. It was a disaster. We splashed ourselves, we hit oars, we switched oars, we kept drifting and were unable to control it properly. The short oar was a really bad idea. We tried this and that, and finally got to the overpass. Ahead of us some people were swimming, and although it may have been fun, i decided to turn around. The time was 6:30, so in my mind, about a half hour, and i didn't want to perform so poorly with so many onlookers. We turned around and made it back at 6:45.

He was soaked, though not from me. I was wet, but not as much as he was. He made a comment to the person pulling us in how he couldn't get any wetter, or the like. To which he responded something between "oh yeah?" and "wanna see?". It was half funny. Anyway, we returned the oars and life jackets, came up front to pay. Another guy was there, who looked at the paper and expressed surprise over us only being out for 15 minutes. I told him it was more like a half hour, this wasn't our original destination, and i had to leave at 7. Although they do not charge for half hours, they do it anyway, but he was confused and asked me if he just charge the full hour anyway. I said sure, i paid and we left. On the way home, the usual 7:55 meeting was canceled. Whatever.

Some people there talked about having a coupon, and i saw there was some restrictions. A search finds them, but there is warning of knowing what it actually covers.

Overall, i had fun, even if it was for just a few minutes. I'm still debating whether it's worth paying 3 times as much to have a path to follow. But 2 kayaks next time. Definitely, 2 kayaks.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Belonging to a different era 2

Feeling a little nostalgic at the moment, but also beginning to sense a serious part of why I feel like a dunce today when it comes to computing when once I felt like a genius.

Quick wall of text on the Nostalgia bit

That article on Vector Graphics the other day reminded me a little of the S-100 bus, and the whole move to the PC ISA that came just before I really got into computing. The first computer I really touched was our school's RM 380Z, which was a proprietary CP/M based system, but exposure to that at school was mostly a "You can book 15 minutes to use it at lunchtime but otherwise the school maths teacher will use it to demonstrate things now and then." So the first computer I learned anything from was a friend's VIC 20. I then used a variety of cheap single-board-computers until my Amiga 500+, the most powerful of which was a Sinclair QL.

So... I never touched S-100. And I didn't really touch the PC until there was literally no other choice that was viable. S-100 was never an option for two major reasons: it was expensive, and it was crap. I mean, seriously, awful. S-100 survived because the home computing establishment's equivalent of the Very Serious People decreed it was Serious, and it was Serious because it was "standard".

A typical S-100 system consisted of the S-100 box itself - a dumb motherboard (very dumb, the only components on it were the edge connectors and a few capacitors and resistors to do all that magic EE specialists understand and I could never get my head around) enclosed in a card cage, plus a CPU card, a completely separate memory card or three, a completely separate disk controller, and a completely separate serial I/O card. The disk controller would be hooked up to a disk drive it was designed to control (yes, proprietary), which would be unlike around 90% of other disk drives out there - that is, if you were lucky. And the I/O card would be hooked up to a terminal that frequently was more powerful than the S-100 computer it was hooked up to..

Each combination of I/O and disk controller cards required a custom BIOS so you could run CP/M with it.

The bus itself was essentially the pins of an 8080 turned into a 100 line bus. So you were essentially wiring each card to an 8080, or something pretending to be an 8080, in parallel. This required quite a bit of hardware in each bus to make sure each didn't conflict with other S-100 cards.

Now, technically, you could get graphics (and maybe sound) cards, but that was unusual. Likewise, you could get more exotic CPUs - though getting software for them was a problem. But the typical S-100 system was text only with a Z80, and the typical S-100 system owner spent rather a lot of time trying to figure out how to order a "standard" CP/M application in a form that would run on their "standard" S-100 system, taking into account their disk drive that only 10% of the market used and their terminal that used VT-52 codes rather than VT-101 codes or (insert one of the other popular terminals here.)

Did I mention this is expensive? While the original Altair 8800 was $500 or so, it came with nothing but the card cage and motherboard, the CPU card, and a little bit of memory. And even on this, the makers barely broke even, expecting to make the profits on after sales. Useful memory, a terminal, an I/O card, a disk controller, and a disk drive, pushed up the prices considerably. Realistically, typical "useful" S-100 systems cost somewhere around $4,000.

Given all of that, it's not really surprising it got supplanted by the PC. Much is made of the fact IBM was taken more seriously by people outside of the personal computer industry in 1981, and that undoubtedly helped, but I can't help but feel that S-100 couldn't have survived for much longer regardless. You could buy a complete system from Commodore or Apple that was more capable for a third of the price even in 1981. The PC didn't need to be cheap, it had IBM's name behind it, but it was obviously more capable than S-100, and it was obvious that if the architecture was adopted by the industry, machines based upon it would be more standardized.

The "Feeling like a dunce" bit

So anyway, that was my train of thought. And it occurred to me that the fact I even have opinions on this suggests my mindset is still stuck there. Back then, even when you programmed in BASIC, you were exerting almost direct control over the hardware. You had a broad idea of what the machine did, what memory locations were mapped onto what functions, and every command you typed affected the computer in a predictable way. The computers themselves were (mostly) predictable too.

As time wore on, especially with the advent of multitasking (which I welcomed, don't get me wrong) you learned to understand your software would be only one party to how the computer behaved, but you understood that if you followed the rules, and the other programmers did too, you could kinda get your head around what was happening to it.

And you felt like a genius if you understood this. And I say "if", because it was possible.

At some point that stopped being possible. Part of it was the PC ISA, the fact an architecture from 1981 was still in use in the mid-nineties by which time it was long in the tooth and needed serious work. Its deficiencies were addressed in software and hardware. Intel essentially replaced the CPU, leaving a compatible stub there to start older applications, and the industry - after a few false starts - threw out most of the PC design and replaced it with the PCI architecture, again, like Intel leaving compatible stubs here and there to ensure older stuff would work. And Microsoft worked on making Windows the real interface software would use to access the hardware.

After a while, there were so many abstractions between your software and the underlying system, it really became hard to determine what was going on underneath. If I program, I now know there are rules I can follow that will reduce the chance of my application being a problem... today. But I don't know if that's the case for the next version of Windows, and all I know is how to reduce the chances, not how to eliminate them. I don't know if the Java I'm writing will generate a webpage that contains Javascript that will contain a memory leak that'll cause the part of the process managing the tab its in to bloat up an additional 100M or so. I can hope it won't, and use mitigation strategies to avoid things that might cause problems, but there are so many things outside of my control I have to trust now, it's just not practical.

Logically the right thing to do under the circumstances is to take back control, to use lower level APIs and simpler sets of rules, but in practice that's just not practical, and doing so means that my tools no longer fit inside the ecosystem with everyone else's. So it's not the right thing - it's actually the worst thing I can do, and if I tried to do it, I'd be shunned as a developer.

I was a genius once because I (mostly) understood the computers I was programming. I feel like a dunce today because that's just not possible any more.

User Journal

Journal Journal: GreaseMonkey scripts 6

I've been making use of GreaseMonkey for some time now. I found some scripts that i lie, namely Allow Password Remembering, Block youtube users, and Google Hit Hider by Domain. I've added a few of my own, Displaying Monk Levels and Checking Saint in our Book for ties, both for PerlMonks and now, Amazon Star percent to number.

I love Amazon Reviews, and those stars mean a lot to me. However, Amazon, in their great wisdom, decided to replace the useful numbers with useless percentages. Well, not useless, but compared to actual numbers, percents mean next to nothing. Who cares if 100% 5-star it, if that's only one person. I'd rather purchase a product with 80% 5-stars, but by a few hundred people. Sure, the number is on top, but who wants to do the math all the time?

To grab the number, the reviews page would have to be loaded for each star. So, i just did multiplication, which will be close enough. I guess the reviews page can get the actual number as opposed to multiplying, but this is good enough, and since it can be the same as the main product page which i did first, i'm not interested in putting in the effort to change it for the reviews page.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Chronicle: Had a problem conceptualizing recusion in Java

I'm reading Java: A Beginner's Guide by Herbert Schildt. Schildt really is good. The lessons are smooth, with small complete examples of everything, explanations, and learning in steps, that is, each chapter builds on what was learned in the past. It's not just a bunch of concepts thrown together.. Here's one case where the O'reilly book just didn't do the job. It was good, but not for learning (reviewing, perhaps.)

I'm typing in every example, skipping the comments though. Also, changing names when they use plurals. An array should be named num, not nums, because each member is an instance of a num. It acts as a collections of nums, but it is not what it is. It's the J/P thing again. In databases, which is J territory, it should clearly be singular. Each record is an instance of the singular object (table.) And, people who think of tables in the plural often come up with terrible deigns and write horrible queries. Their using the database to support a specific process (which always changes, anyway) and not to hold data. They never learn. But i digress. Programs are about getting something done, so, it is more likely it should be named in the plural. I guess i'm in the wrong here. Though, as my code is for me (as opposed to if i was on a team), i'm going to follow my own preference.

In the Self Test for Chapter 6, question 6 is: Write a recursive method that displays the contents of a string backwards. I hit a mental block with that yesterday and just couldn't get it right. I was amazed (read: horrified) that such a small thing could be so hard. I ought to be able to (know what i need to do to) write that in seconds. After some fumbling over char vs String, it was time to go home. Today i approached the code and fixed it in just a few minutes.

class test06
{
  static String backward(String a)
  {
    if(a.length() == 1) return a;

    return a.substring(a.length() - 1) + backward(a.substring(0, a.length() - 1));
  }

  public static void main(String arg[])
  {
    System.out.println(backward("abcdef"));
  }
}

When i first got the question, i misunderstood it. I saw his answer and realized i misread it, so i tried this. Compared to his answer, he cheats. He used .charAt() to print out one char at a time from within the method. Granted, the book does that at this point, but this one is truer. And, i need something to be proud about.

But why did it take me so long? At first, i assumed its because i'm not used to Java, recursion is silly in this case, and i don't usually do recursion. But that's not true. I had a problem conceptualizing it, its effective, and i do it occasionally in SQL. But there's the answer. I do it in SQL.

Recursive CTEs are a pain. While more versatile than Oracle's hierarchical queries (which have a number of their own benefits), they are also confusing to learn. At some point it clicks though, and then its just a matter of keeping things straight in your head. However, in SQL's recursion the inner most level is also the final level. Outside of SQL, the opposite is true.

It's convenient to have blame it on SQL, though i know it's not true. Embarrassing as it is, i hit a mental block on the concept. Nonetheless, SQL likely had something to do with my confusion. I love these "easy" tests.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Rant: Why i hate Java (simple, old debate) 4

Why do i hate Java? (And C too.) retardedNames, case sensitivity, offsets treated like indexes. These are examples of where programmers had good ideas but then unfortunately designed them into a language.

0 is not a number. A number represents a quantity and 0 is not a quantity. You don't declare an array less one because 0 is a number. However, it is treated as a number for convenience. Why then refer to an index in an array with 0 first? Okay, okay, i know. It's because the variable is just a pointer, and the index is really an offset. So then why use an offset to index an array? Seriously. In how many cases do you treat the offset as an index. And in how many do you treat it like an offset? I thought so.

Then there's the whole = vs ==. Debate over whether = should set or compare is understandable. Personally, i would never have used = to set, because most people use it to demonstrate equality. Not to test it, but to demonstrate it. As in any math equation we teach children. With that in mind, i would think it was more likely to be used to test equality rather than set it. Furthermore, pick the odd operator out: =, +=, -=, *=, /=. ^=. Yeah, yeah, those are for convenience. But how many times have you mistaken the double-character operator for anything else. Yes, but they have another operator that makes it obvious. Exactly. Isn't == obviously setting without an operation. x += y adds y to x then sets. x -= y subtracts y from x then sets. So, x == y should equal y to x then set. Slightly bumpy because it sets x to y and not vice versa, but its really easy to understand. And, earlier languages did it with :=. Same thing.

BASIC used = for both. Noone used LET outside of teaching. Regardless, context defined it anyway. Context is not available in Java because it allows you do do nifty things like increment an array offset while setting it. So, no context. Of course, this leads to bugs and the niftiness is often considered bad practice, but isn't it cool that we can do it?

I've seen absolute morons coding in BASIC. But never once had i seen them use = to do what they didn't intend. You know why? Because its impossible! Context rules. On the same note, i've read about talented programmers who made the mistake in C(++).

Prefix and postfix ++ and -- are a little different. They are not obvious (until you know what they do), and other than errors in logic, they are used as intended. They break context, per se, but that is what they are designed to do. Applying this to the poor = sign is just plain ridiculous.

Seriously, why are these things done when they are counterintuitive, prone to bugs, and bad practice? Were the designers brain dead, or just 31337 h4x0rz that hadn't grown up yet? Or, is everyone so blind to this because they never made this mistake.

Okay, the languages weren't designed inasmuch as they just ended up being used. But why? Was it because the pros outweighed the cons? Or was it because programmers actually like this nonsense?

User Journal

Journal Journal: Winduhs

I think the whole mobile operating system thing has screwed up GUI design to a certain degree. Microsoft, Ubuntu, and GNOME have both been brave and tried something new, but what they ended up with ended up being highly unpopular on the desktop. And to be honest, I think only Microsoft ended up with something truly good on a touch interface, though I admit to not using Ubuntu or GNOME in those contexts, just being aware that they've not really encouraged an ecosystem for applications to work well in a tablet environment, leaving users with only the main shell being friendly. So the loss of optimization for the desktop lead to no significant gains elsewhere.

The way I'm seeing it, Windows 10 seems to be genuinely exciting, and a decent modern desktop, that also encourages cross interface design. Microsoft has learned from the mistakes it made with Windows 8, kept the good parts, and put together something truly great and modern.

I don't really want to be stuck with Windows though as my primary OS. I'm hoping Ubuntu et al actually learn from it.

This is something you'll never normally hear from me, but perhaps they need a Miguel type figure to take a lead in either GNOME or Ubuntu. At this point, at least to me, it looks like Microsoft is the one with the good ideas about how a UI should work and the relationship of an application to the UI frameworks of the underlying OS. I don't want anyone to clone Windows, but it would be nice to learn from it, at least.

Back in the 1990s, nerds like me put together our own "desktops", running random window managers, app launchers, and file managers (if that) that seemed to go together. I'm feeling like the FOSS "desktop" is heading back to that era, of stuff that doesn't really go together, being shoehorned to fit, with no real philosophy binding the system together.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Chronicle: Yesterday's bike ride

Rode my bicycle yesterday for exercise, with intent to go to Meijers (The name, Meijer's Thrifty Acres, which people colloquial called "Meijers". The name has changed, removing the need for the possessive "s." Kids and sticklers now use the new name.) I did go there, stopping off at the Royal Oak Post Office en route.

The post office is a nice one. I used to have a PO Box there. They've since added inner doors to replace the gate locked at nighttime. The doors look nicer when closed, i guess, but also makes it look more office-like during regular business hours. The bike stand/rock was missing outside, so i used the railing on the accessibility ramp. It goes around like a hairpin, but gets more narrow in middle of the second half. Well, if whoever uses it can use the more narrow part, using the side of the excess shouldn't be an issue, should it?

Anyway, they're slow, but what government office isn't? When the guy two in front of me went up (without being called, to wait for the returning clerk, who asked if he was actually next when she came back) the guy in front of me went moved up. The line at the office is not straight. There is the counter and an open area for standing and leaving, then an island with a flat top and forms on the side. The line forms on the other side of the island and around the bend, where people usually wait to be called. So, both people in front of me were facing perpendicular to the direction i was facing. When two-in-front went up, one-in-front walked forward. I turn and got behind him, and he moved up just a little further. Obviously, he wanted room. So be it. I figured he might not kike Jews, so i didn't stare at him either. That is, i made sure to look away from him. He did his business and left. I needed only a minute, so i was out relatively quickly.

As i was beginning to ride away on my bike, he commented (while unlocking his car?) to me, "I never saw a rabbi on a bike before." I smiled and kept on riding. I still don't know what he meant by the statement or why he considered me a rabbi. Mayhap, he doesn't get out much. :)

Before i even got to Meijers, i was pooped, and realized i really needed the break before i could ride home. The stop at the post office elongated my trip more than expected, and i wasn't ready for that much exertion this summer, yet. I took my time in the store, including checking out the Italian section, and getting Turkish sun dried tomatoes. I may go back and grab some of the Pomi products (they had two, iirc) to see if they are that good.

On my way home, i evoked the same responses as usual. People stare at me biking. I think people stare at all bikers, or better put, intruders on their domain. Anyway, as i was riding down one street, i saw two boys playing a couple(?) blocks ahead. The first went inside. Seemed normal. I don't know if he saw me or not. The second saw me and ran inside too. Nope, not inside. As i passed by, i saw him hiding behind a bush. Did he think i might curse him or was he just afraid or shy? I wish could go back and ask. Or maybe watch a video online with comments. Hmm... bike cam, anyone? :)

User Journal

Journal Journal: Chronicle: Warm office, but what can i do? (2) 2

Well, two ladies came by in response to the request, at least one of which looked like she was dressed for dinner. I ignored them when they first walked by until they specifically asked for my attention. I had no idea that was normal business attire and really didn't think they were there for me.

Well, they have no half walls and no wall would make the desk fall down. I said i'd be willing to give up that part of the desk, but it didn't look like that was an option. We discussed the closed vent and i mentioned that it bothered other people in the past and i didn't want to bother them now. As they continued questioning, my neighbor piped in with her past experience. Finally, they suggested they would have an engineer look at the vent. I tried making a joke by telling them they could attach a pipe to the vent and put it down my back (which wouldn't bother anyone else...) One of them forced a small giggle. I don't even need retrospect to realize it was poorly timed. My mistake was to not appreciate that no comment is better than a bad one.

As they spoke i realized the were standing and i was sitting. Not being their superior, etiquette would demand that i stand, and stand i did. It's not something i always remember to do, as so many people do not. This etiquette in not a gender thing, but a respect thing. Sitting while other stand and speak to you is considered haughty (or inconsiderate, at the very least), or so i have been taught. A lot of people either disagree or just don't care.

I did bring in a thermometer today, changing the battery with a March 2015 expiry. It was 74+ all morning. When they left i looked again and saw it got lower, Right now its 72.5. Weird.

[I used the word "as" too much. Also i need to work on flow, as opposed to a collection of related statements.]

User Journal

Journal Journal: Chronicle: Killed smss.exe 4

I almost never reboot Windows at the office. It takes too long, requires turning off all the stuff the IT department uses to ruin my day, and wastes time getting things setup just right. Instead, i just hibernate, and bear the few minutes it takes to get back to normal. (Hmm.. very winteresting.)

This morning while "researching" why some system process (via Process Explorer) was hogging 200MB of memory, and tried restarting it. Luckily, it rejected the idea, and told me other processes relied on it. So, i clicked back to tree list, leaving it highlighted, and saw its progeny included smss.exe. Perhaps out of sheer ignorance, perhaps because i got it mixed up with sms.exe, i asked to restart it. Instant BSOD.

Come to think of it, that was really stupid. Firstly, killing the session manager would at best shut down the OS. But i should have researched it first. So silly. Please, laugh at me, heartily.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Rant: Warm office, but what can i do? 8

I really dislike the summer in the office. It gets warmer outside so the women start wearing less clothes. Then they complain the office is too cold. Really?! My water consumption went up this week, and i''ve been buying caffeinated drinks just to stay awake.

I have an air vent above me which was closed before i got here because the lady next cubicle over, who is very nice and sensible as long as she agrees with you, complained of being too cold. When i asked her about it, she said opening it would make her cold, require her to wear a sweater and socks (perish the thought!) and then take them off when she got outside, which would inconvenience her. About me, who gets much too hot and cannot take off my clothes, she offered me the ice pack she uses to keep her lunch cool, to place on my neck or in front or in back of my fan. I guess i'm just clothes-minded. Anyway, arguing with a coworker is not productive and only ends up in fights, if everyone stays employed. So, i'm looking for other solutions.

As our section of the cube farm is a set of four cubicles with their own walls, airflow is restricted. I made a request to maintenance to remove one of my walls or replace it with a half-wall (suggested by another clothes-challenged woman, who sits near a window (no windows can be opened)). That may allow for better air flow. The request went in yesterday, though i have to find out if that is the correct group to make the request to, and if this is allowed, or even if it would be approved.

In years past i've wondered why hot air made me uncomfortable and tired, yet outside i was fine. To wit, inside, at 72 i'm warm, 74 is uncomfortable, 76 is really uncomfortable and i am tired, and at 78 i've been known to blank out (depends on how tired i am). Outside, however, i can weather the 80s and love it. After reading and testing, i found the difference to be fresh air. I don't mind the heat, but the stale air. Take away my fresh air, and i'll need the air to be cooler. I'm assuming this is true for most people, though the range will differ.

Well, fresh air is out of the question here. The windows are closed, we're a few floors up, and the vent that would blow directly on to me has been closed. So, i need to be cooler. Iced and caffeinated drinks only work so much, cost a bit, and have other consequences. A personal air conditioner would seem best, but do those even exist? I mean, there are personal heaters which do the job well. But what about cooling the air? Fans do little more than move the air. I have a fan, but the walls of the cubicle stifle its already limited effect. There are sponge coolers that have mixed reviews. I'm looking for a(n impossible) air conditioner that would just blow the hot air under the cubicle wall (or the like), would be silent, and be powerful enough to cool me down. I don't need much more than that. Truthfully, any idea might work, as long as it is relatively noiseless and inconspicuous.

The only function of economic forecasting is to make astrology look respectable. -- John Kenneth Galbraith

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