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Submission + - Adobe to sue Apple over Flash cross-compiler ban (

sopssa writes: "IT World reports that Adobe intends to sue Apple "within a few weeks," citing sources close to Adobe. Not only did the recent iPhone and iPad licensing change ban Adobe's Flash-to-iPhone cross-compiler, but also Novell's MonoTouch which lets you compile C# and .NET apps to the iPhone. "Applications must be originally written in Objective-C, C, C++, or JavaScript as executed by the iPhone OS WebKit engine, and only code written in C, C++, and Objective-C may compile and directly link against the Documented APIs". Lee Brimelow notes in his blog post that "What they are saying is that they won’t allow applications onto their marketplace solely because of what language was originally used to create them. This is a frightening move that has no rational defense other than wanting tyrannical control over developers and more importantly, wanting to use developers as pawns in their crusade against Adobe. This does not just affect Adobe but also other technologies like Unity3D."."

Submission + - How many hours a week can you program?

An anonymous reader writes: How many hours a week should a full-time programmer program?

Trying to program anywhere near 40 wears me out. On a good week, I can do 20. Often, it is around 10 or 15. I'm talking about your programming session at the console, typing — including, of course, stopping and thinking for a minute, but not meetings, reading programming books, notes, specifications, etc., which by comparison feel like lunch breaks. I rarely get called to meetings (which is good) but that means to keep my brain from overheating I spend several hours a week surfing the web (usually reading tech news but also a few stops on Facebook, email, etc).

I should add that I am interrupted a few times per day. Me and another guy maintain an intranet site of a couple dozen web apps for an I.T. department, so we work on a few different things: phone calls, bug fixes, feature adds, as well as writing new web apps from the ground up, all in a days' work. And I know that wears a person out more than if they had just one project to work on.

I wonder if programming is like mental sprinting, not walking, so you can only do it in bursts. Am I normal or stealing?

Numeric stability is probably not all that important when you're guessing.