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+ - The Windows Store is a Cesspool of Scam Apps, Why Doesn't Microsoft Care?->

Submitted by capedgirardeau
capedgirardeau (531367) writes "Microsoft’s Windows Store is a mess. It’s full of apps that exist only to scam people and take their money. Why doesn’t Microsoft care that their flagship app store is such a cesspool? ... It’s now been more than two years since Windows 8 was released, and this has been a problem the entire time, and it is getting worse. If Microsoft was trying to offer a safe app store to Windows users, they’ve failed. Searching for most popular apps will return a list of many scam clones that charge a fee for what is a free app from the official publisher and you have to hope there is no malware installed as well. Worse yet, the Windows Store is now integrated with the system search feature. Search for an application using the Start screen search or search charm and these garbage apps from the Windows Store will appear. The article points out the reason is probably "Microsoft hasn’t been encouraging quality apps. Instead, they just want quantity. In March, 2013, Microsoft ran a promotion where they paid developers $100 for each app they submitted to the Windows Store or Windows Phone Store.""
Link to Original Source

+ - New Permission System Potentially Makes Android Much Less Secure 1

Submitted by capedgirardeau
capedgirardeau (531367) writes "An update to the Google Play store now groups app permissions into collections of related permissions making them much less fine grained and potentially misleading for users. For example the SMS permissions group would allow an app access to both reading and sending SMS messages. The problem is that once an app has access to the group of permissions, it can make use of any of the allowed actions at anytime without ever informing the user. As Google explains: "It’s a good idea to review permissions groups before downloading an app. Once you’ve allowed an app to access a permissions group, the app may use any of the individual permissions that are part of that group. You won’t need to manually approve individual permissions updates that belong to a permissions group you’ve already accepted.""
Editorial

Misogyny, Entitlement, and Nerds 1198

Posted by Soulskill
from the coming-to-terms-with-reality dept.
PvtVoid writes: "Jeopardy champion Arthur Chu pens a heartfelt takedown of misogyny in nerd culture: 'I’ve heard and seen the stories that those of you who followed the #YesAllWomen hashtag on Twitter have seen—women getting groped at cons, women getting vicious insults flung at them online, women getting stalked by creeps in college and told they should be "flattered." I’ve heard Elliot Rodger’s voice before. I was expecting his manifesto to be incomprehensible madness—hoping for it to be—but it wasn’t. It’s a standard frustrated angry geeky guy manifesto, except for the part about mass murder. I've heard it from acquaintances, I've heard it from friends. I've heard it come out of my own mouth, in moments of anger and weakness.

What the f*$# is wrong with us? How much longer are we going to be in denial that there's a thing called "rape culture" and we ought to do something about it? ... To paraphrase the great John Oliver, listen up, fellow self-pitying nerd boys — we are not the victims here. We are not the underdogs. We are not the ones who have our ownership over our bodies and our emotions stepped on constantly by other people's entitlement. We're not the ones where one out of six of us will have someone violently attempt to take control of our bodies in our lifetimes.'"
Science

Fossils of Earliest Known Pterosaur Found 18

Posted by Soulskill
from the death-from-the-skies dept.
damn_registrars writes: "A fossil of the earliest known Pterosaur flying reptile was found recently in China. Named Kryptodrakon progenitor, it was described in a paper published yesterday in the journal Current Biology (abstract). Its wingspan was about a meter and a half, very small compared to its evolutionary descendents, whose wingspan reached over 10 meters. 'The pterosaurs remained largely unchanged for tens of millions of years — with characteristics like long tails and relatively small heads — and none became very big. But later during the Jurassic period, some developed anatomical changes that heralded the arrival of a new branch called pterodactyloids that eventually replaced the more primitive forms of pterosaurs. Many of these pterodactyloids had massive, elongated heads topped with huge crests, lost their teeth and grew to huge sizes. Perhaps the defining characteristic of the group is an elongation in the bone at the base of the fourth finger called the fourth metacarpal, and Kryptodrakon is the oldest known pterosaur to have this advance, the researchers said.'"

Comment: Re:So - who's in love with the government again? (Score 4, Informative) 397

by capedgirardeau (#46795775) Attached to: Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

I like my government to help make sure things are safe for eating and drinking.

And I especially like when the government responds to criticisms by saying they didn't understand this issue when they made their rules and will take comments from the industry and revise their proposed rules as they have done in this case.

I know it is not as fun for the anti-government types, but even the linked to article mentions it at the very bottom of the story:

The FDA will open up the rule to comments again this summer and then revise the proposal, which is due to be finalized by August, 2015.

So this is already a non issue, they have agreed to revise the rules so there are not the dire consequences the article was using to stir everyone up.

Comment: This seems plausable (Score 3, Insightful) 149

by capedgirardeau (#46729531) Attached to: NSA Allegedly Exploited Heartbleed

I can understand this happening. It would make sense that the NSA would have someone or multiple people review every patch and check-in for a package as important as OpenSSH, just looking for exploitable mistakes.

I would not be surprised if they review a great deal of FOSS software they deem important to national security.

Comment: This happens all the time (Score 2) 173

by capedgirardeau (#46593087) Attached to: Homeopathic Remedies Recalled For Containing Real Medicine

This happens all the time, some quack alt "medicine" is recalled because it actually contains a known effective drug. Most often it is "herbal" dick pills that contain the active ingredient in traditional ED medications.

Getting on the "Recalls, Market Withdrawals and Safety Alerts for U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA)" email list can be very entertaining:

http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/ContactFDA/StayInformed/GetEmailUpdates/default.htm

Comment: Re:So close, and yet so far (Score 1) 264

by capedgirardeau (#46390645) Attached to: Apple Launches CarPlay At Geneva Show

Your comment is exactly right on on the money.

I have driven a number of cars with digital controls for the radio, tuning, volume and climate systems, temp, fan, distribution and they were terrible.

You must take your eyes off the road to deal with them, whereas, if you have knobs, buttons and sliders your hands can take care of it all.

I will never buy a car will all digital controls, that is one place touch screens do not belong.

Comment: Re:Wrong (Score 3, Insightful) 287

by capedgirardeau (#46149769) Attached to: Layoffs At Now-Private Dell May Hit Over 15,000 Staffers

Of course people want to lay off 15% of the workforce. That is very typical in leveraged buyout processes and part of the plan from square one.

You are take out big loans to buy the company, knowing you are going to immediately gut it maximize profits in the short term so you can pay off the loans. Then you continue to milk what remains as profit, letting the business decline knowing you can sell off chunks to get the last drop of value out of the company, and then at the very end, when you have loaded it up with debt again, you declare it bankrupt and walk away.

Comment: Re:I have no doubt this is true in the whole (Score 1) 279

by capedgirardeau (#46126737) Attached to: Animal Drug Investigation Reveals Pet Medication Often Doesn't Work

The placebo effect does affect animals. At least some of the placebo effect can be due to the attention, interaction and care the patient receives in the process of getting the fake/non effective medication or treatment and the same thing can impact animals if they get more attention/affection during the "treatment".

Also, since the placebo effect only works on subjective symptoms like self reported pain or ease of movement, if a person is doing the evaluating for the animal, they can make the same biased evaluations of the subjective symptoms, just about the animal instead of themselves.

Comment: No real surprise (Score 5, Insightful) 313

by capedgirardeau (#46116847) Attached to: Half of US Nuclear Missile Wing Implicated In Cheating

No surprise to me.

It is a terrible, mind numbingly boring job that is essentially a career killer in the Air Force. Not to mention the fact that the likelihood of them actually having to do what they train for is very low and if they do have to do what they trained for it basically means they are helping end life on this planet as we know it.

I completely understand why they would not be motivated to excel on the exams and/or might smoke a little grass.

I wonder what their Russian counterparts' moral is like.

Japan

200 Dolphins Await Slaughter In Japan's Taiji Cove 628

Posted by samzenpus
from the but-we've-always-stabbed-them dept.
Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "CNN reports that more than 200 bottlenose dolphins remain penned in a cove by Japanese fishermen, many of them stressed and bloodied from their attempts to escape before fishermen start to slaughter them for meat. Until now, the fishermen have focused on selecting dolphins to be sold into captivity at marine parks and aquariums in Japan and overseas as twenty-five dolphins, including a rare albino calf, were taken on Saturday 'to a lifetime of imprisonment,' and another 12 on Sunday. 'Many of the 200+ Bottlenose dolphins who are in still the cove are visibly bloody & injured from their attempts to escape the killers,' one update says. Although the hunting of dolphins is widely condemned in the west, Japanese defend the practice as a local custom — and say it is no different to the slaughter of other animals for meat. The Wakayama Prefecture, where Taiji is located condemns the criticism as biased and unfair to the fishermen. 'Taiji dolphin fishermen are just conducting a legal fishing activity in their traditional way in full accordance with regulations and rules under the supervision of both the national and the prefectural governments. Therefore, we believe there are no reasons to criticize the Taiji dolphin fishery.' Meanwhile the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society describes how about 40 to 60 local fishermen work with nets to divide up the pod, whose initial numbers were estimated by the group at more than 250. 'They tighten up the nets to bring each sub-group together then the skiffs push them toward the tarps. Under the tarps in the shallows is where the trainers work with the killers to select the "prettiest" dolphins which will sell and make the best pay day for the hunters,' the group says. The fishermen will 'kill the "undesirable" dolphins (those with nicks and scars) under the tarps to hide from our cameras when that time comes.'"

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