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Submission + - Google's 2nd Android Developer Contest kicksoff 1

coffeeisclassy writes: Google's second Android Developer Contest (ADC2) has started, despite some confusion around how to submit applications. The prizes are different from the first ADC, with each category having prizes of 100k, 50k, and 25k and an overall best of 150k,50k and 25k, meaning the best Android application from ADC2 is eligible for ~250k. The rules seem to allow any application never published before August 1st to compete and is open through the end of August (so break out your keyboards!). The top prizes are certainly less than that of first ADC, but with the prizes broken down by category Google may be hoping to inspire some love for less popular categories. While some other developers are waiting to find out to submit, one developer has moved ahead and released one of there entires Pigs Can Fly Site Monitor (also on Google Market for those with Androids). So if you've been waiting for an excuse to start a new side-project, here you have it :)

Your Browser History Is Showing Screenshot-sm 174

tiffanydanica writes "For a lot of us our browser history is something we consider private, or at least not something we want to expose to every website we visit. Web2.0collage is showing just how easy it is (with code!) for sites to determine what sites you visit. When you visit the site it sniffs your browser history, and creates a collage of the (safe for work) sites that you visit. It is an interesting application of potentially scary technology (imagine a job application site using this to screen candidates). You can jump right into having your history sniffed if you so desire. While the collages are cool on their own merit, they also serve as an illustration of the privacy implications of browser history sniffing."

Submission + - Finally ... PostgreSQL 8.4 ( 1

TheFuzzy writes: "Another year, another major release. The PostgreSQL development team has finally released PostgreSQL 8.4 (and there was much rejoicing). This version contains windowing functions for the Biz Intelligence types, and recursive queries for everyone else doing a web application. Postgres has also put a lot of work into changing many of the things which made it "hard to use" in the past. Try it and see if you agree."

Submission + - Sniffing browser history for awareness & art

tdalek writes: uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and then creates a collage of them. While the collage is kind of nifty, it also graphically illustrates just how easy it is for people to sniff your browser history. Before you get too worried, it uses a white-list of SFW sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habits). However, just because these people play nice is no guarantee that everyone else will. Other potential benign applications including customizing bookmark-lets, but the less than benign (say advertising or even hr site) implications or troublesome. An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For slashdotters not interested in warnings or explanations, you can jump straight to the browser history sniffing
The Internet

Submission + - Sniffing browser history for art

holdenkarau writes: "You may remember previous slashdot discussions on browser history sniffing, but there is a new kid in town doing something a bit different. uses similar browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning screen and go straight to the browser sniffing this should do the trick."

Submission + - Bill Gates on software, from 1989 1

An anonymous reader writes: The University of Waterloo has uploaded a talk by Bill Gates, on software, that took place there in 1989. Available here, the talk was only recently digitized and contains many predictions from someone who was already starting to become an industry leader at that time. Many are surprisingly accurate and quite relevant today.

Submission + - The Software Tools Business, a Microsoft View

holden writes: "Rico Mariani, an eighteen-year veteran at Microsoft, spoke to the University of Waterloo Computer Science Club, sharing his unique take on the history of, and controversies surrounding, Microsoft and the software tools industry in general. His responses in the q&a session to free software advocates is particularly interesting. The talk bas been digitized and is now available online."

Submission + - Designing software with Privacy in mind 6

dalektcalum writes: Dr. Ann Cavoukian, Canada's Information and Privacy Commissioner, recently gave a talk entitled Privacy by Design. The talk starts of by covering the basics of privacy, and privacy law, and then moves onto the important component, how to design software that properly protects users privacy. The majourity of the time is spent on design principles, but also examines specific technologies (such as Elliptical Curve Cryptography).

Be careful when a loop exits to the same place from side and bottom.