Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
United States

+ - Harvard Physicists Bring Light to a Complete Halt

Submitted by
tetrikphimvin
tetrikphimvin writes "In a quantum mechanical sleight of hand, Harvard physicists have shown that they can not only bring a pulse of light, the fleetest of nature's particles, to a complete halt, but also resuscitate the light at a different location and let it continue on its way.
"It's been a wonderful problem to try to wrap your brain around," said Lene Vestergaard Hau, a professor of physics at Harvard and senior author of a paper describing the experiment that appears today in the journal Nature. "There are so many doors that open up." This is also noted in Harvard's Gazette here, which includes video links."
Security

+ - DNS Attack only a warning shot?

Submitted by ancientribe
ancientribe (1057834) writes "The attack on the Internet infrastructure yesterday may signal a hint of bigger things to come: the distributed denial-of-service (DDOS) attack on the Domain Name System (DNS) root servers was likely a test-run for a potentially larger and more disruptive attack.

It was the latest in a series of DDOS attacks on DNS servers that began late last year with attacks on EveryDNS and EasyDNS. Experts had predicted it was only a matter of time before botnet operators hit a bigger and higher-profile DNS target, and that's just what happened yesterday, according to this article in Dark Reading.

http://www.darkreading.com/document.asp?doc_id=116 685&WT.svl=news1_1"
Space

+ - Clouds Revealed on Titan

Submitted by
sporkme
sporkme writes "New images from Titan may reveal insight to the role of methane on Saturn's largest moon. From the article:

NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured the image of the 1,490-mile-diameter (2,400-kilometer-diameter) cloud on December 29, 2006. The cloud's presence fits predictions that Titan has a "methane cycle" similar to Earth's water cycle, with bodies of liquid methane evaporating and forming clouds that rain material back down on the surface.
Titan is the only moon that is known to have an atmosphere of significant composition, which in this case is almost entirely nitrogen. The cloud is about half the size of the United States, and the images are astounding."
Announcements

+ - Put the Amiga Demoscene in your DVD Player

Submitted by
Jason Scott
Jason Scott writes "Four years ago, the crew at Hornet put out a collection of PC demos spanning 10 years on a DVD, and called it "Mindcandy". Everyone asked when they'd come out with a DVD of demos for other platforms, and just four short years later, they've announced MindCandy 2: Amiga Demos. It's got 30 Amiga demos rendered on the original hardware, a documentary about how a demoparty is run, and even 5.1 surround remixes of all the music. Additionally, they're sponsoring a rare US demoparty this April called Blockparty. It's a great year for demos!"
Yahoo!

+ - Solar power eliminates utility bills in U.S. home

Submitted by
skyhawker
skyhawker writes "Yahoo! News is running an interesting article about a New Jersey home that uses solar power to provide 100% of its energy needs, including fuel for the owner's hydrogen fuel cell powered automobile. The power system is provided by Renewable Energy International, which has one of the weirdest web sites I've ever seen — the links seem to work only in IE."
Programming

+ - programmed code - yours or the company's?

Submitted by
markybob
markybob writes "While working for my current employer, I do a lot in my job (small company), from basic network setup to programming. At the end of the day, since I never signed any kind of licensing agreement or copyright transfer, I am still the owner of my code, even if I allow the company to use it, correct? If I leave the company, could I reasonably use that code for whatever purposes I fit, even if selling my code to someone else or asking my old company to license it if they wish to keep using it? How would other Slashdotters handle this situation?"
Hardware Hacking

+ - Where to donate old hardware?

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "Like many Slashdotters, I have a surplus of old computers and parts that I (and family and friends) no longer have use for. Some of this junk is still useful, and although I'm too busy to sell it piecemeal on eBay, it'd be a shame to just throw it away. I'd prefer to just drop this stuff off, driver disks and instruction manuals included where applicable, at a major charity such as Good Will, AmVets, or the Salvation Army, but I suspect that they wouldn't be able to move it and would end up throwing it away. Anyone have any recommendations for the major charities or any suggestions for recycling options?"
Education

+ - Inconvenient Truth Too Inconvenient For Schools

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The Federal Way School Board in Washington State recently restricted the showing of An Inconvenient Truth, Al Gore's documentary about global warming and its potential effects on Earth. An email was sent to the school board that said "The Bible says that in the end times everything will burn up, but that perspective isn't in the DVD" prompting one of the board members to propose a moratorium on the showing of the film. The film is being made available to educators via participate.net, which also provides films such as Fast Food Nation, Murderball (not what it sounds like), and Stand Up. Up to 50,000 copies of An Inconvenient Truth are made available to teachers."
Television

+ - Senator to FCC: no broadcast flag for you!

Submitted by Flag waver
Flag waver (666) writes "Senator John Sununu (R-NH) will introduce legislation that will prevent the FCC from creating technology mandates for the consumer electronics industry. As a result, the FCC would be hamstrung in its efforts to revive the broadcast flag. '"The FCC seems to be under the belief that it should occasionally impose technology mandates," Sununu said in a statement. "These misguided requirements distort the marketplace by forcing industry to adopt agency-blessed solutions rather than allow innovative and competitive approaches to develop."' Sen. Sununu previously tried without success to remove the broadcast flag provisions from the massive telecommunications bill that died before reaching the Senate floor during the last Congress."
Television

+ - FCC Opens Market for Cable Boxes

Submitted by
fistfullast33l
fistfullast33l writes "The FCC rendered a decision today against a Comcast appeal that centers on integrated security features in set-top cable boxes. The decision comes at the end of a long standing feud between the FCC and Cable Companies over the matter. The result is that starting July 1st, cable boxes distributed by Cable Companies must not be tied directly to a cable provider via internal security features. This rule is viewed as the first step in creating a market for set-top cable boxes. Comcast does have the right to appeal and has said they will do so. From the article: "Several major consumer electronics manufacturers have argued that if set-top boxes weren't directly linked to the provision of cable service, they could enter the set-top market. Consumers could get a cable card from their service provider that they could insert into a set-top box purchased at a consumer electronics store. The cards would ensure that consumers could only access channels that they paid for.""
PC Games (Games)

+ - World of Warcraft now the size of New York City

Submitted by
DeadBugs
DeadBugs writes "World Of Warcraft has passed 8 Million subscribers. This would put it on par with the population of New York (the largest city in the United States). With the first expansion coming out since the game was released, the game could easily pass 10 million people.

From the press release: "Since debuting in North America on November 23, 2004, World of Warcraft has become the most popular MMORPG around the world. Today, World of Warcraft is available in seven different languages and is played in North America, Europe, mainland China, Korea, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, and the regions of Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau.""
Wireless Networking

+ - Is it dangerous to share my 802.11b/g?

Submitted by
oiarbovnb
oiarbovnb writes "I recently moved into a new house and it took me a while to get my internet connected. For the first couple of weeks, I connected to an unsecured network one of my neighbors provided (they changed the name of the network, so I think they knew what they were doing, but left it open anyway). Now that I have my own internet (cable-modem), what are the problems with sharing this? I already know that they can read any non-encrypted information, but they cannot view information that is sent via https. I also know that I should install a software firewall and have anti-virus going and all that jazz. I named my network "Free!!! Be Nice!" in the hopes that if my neighbors do use my network, they don't try to hose my system. Karma-security I guess you could call it..."
Technology (Apple)

+ - Cisco VP Explains Lawsuit Against Apple

Submitted by
Dekortage
Dekortage writes "The day after Apple announced its iPhone, Cisco sued over the name. Mark Chandler, Cisco's SVP and General Counsel, has posted an explanation of the suit on his blog: "For the last few weeks, we have been in serious discussions with Apple over how the two companies could work together and share the iPhone trademark. ...I was surprised and disappointed when Apple decided to go ahead and announce their new product with our trademarked name without reaching an agreement. It was essentially the equivalent of 'we're too busy.'" What did Cisco want? "[We] wanted an open approach. We hoped our products could interoperate in the future.""
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Scientists create world's largest novelty atom

Submitted by
haja
haja writes "CNN Reports: Scientists create world's largest novelty atom: Scientists have long been labeled as overly serious, narrowly focused individuals who don't have time for fun. But two University of Chicago atomic physicists proved that even the most buttoned-down professionals are capable of enjoying a good laugh every now and then. Last week, Drs. Marcus Hurley and Thom Fredericks unveiled what they are calling their "most hilarious work to date": an oversize novelty atom that measures "a ridiculously huge" 8.2 x 10-10 meters in diameter."
Robotics

+ - iRobot Create: Fully programmable mobile robot

Submitted by paxmaniac
paxmaniac (988091) writes "iRobot has announced Create: a new fully programmable mobile robot based on the Roomba robotic vacuum cleaner.

People have been hacking the Roomba since the day it came out. Well, hacking just got a whole lot easier. A command module for the Create provides a programmable 8-bit Atmel micro controller, four DB-9 ports for your own sensors, and a number of sample programs that can be compiled and uploaded to the command module via USB.

Some more details along with some cool applications here.

This looks like the perfect robotics platform for hobbyists, schools and universities alike."

If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

Working...