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Software

+ - Can Hadoop Survive its Weird Beginning?->

Submitted by
concealment
concealment writes "Hadoop is not like other efforts to commercialize open source in some important ways. In addition, is arriving at a time in which some of the traditional advantages of open source-based business models have eroded because of cloud computing and other developments.

Most people think of Hadoop as pioneering technology that is being developed through an open source ecosystem. But if we take a closer look at Hadoop’s origins and the current structure of its community, it quickly becomes clear that Hadoop is not following the footsteps of other projects like Linux, Drupal, Alfresco, or JBoss. Hadoop started out differently and has evolved into a structure that is much different than any other project that is so prominent."

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Businesses

+ - Here come the humanoids. There go U.S. jobs-> 1

Submitted by
concealment
concealment writes "Rethink Robotics founder Rodney Brooks took to the stage at the Techonomy conference here to talk about the wonders of his new robot, Baxter, which is designed to work on factory floors doing dull and necessary tasks. He costs just $25,000 and works for what amounts to $4 an hour.

Baxter is a step forward in robotics with mass potential. It has a face and sensors to tell it when people are near. It's about as close to a humanoid robot as we can get, and Brooks said it's just the beginning.

"Within 10 years, we're going to see humanoid robots," said Brooks, who was a co-founder of iRobot, maker of iRoomba, the vacuum cleaner robot."

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Science

+ - Wayback Machine trumps FOI tribunal->

Submitted by calder123
calder123 (911363) writes "Last week, the BBC won an FOIA tribunal ruling that they didn't have to reveal the names of attendees at a seminar in 2006, designed to shape the BBC's coverage of climate change issues. The document, uncovered by Maurizio Morabito, puts comments by the BBC that the meeting was held under Chatham House rules, and that that the seminar drew on top scientific advice in an interesting light. In a bizarre co-incidence, four of the BBC's attendees at the seminar have resigned in the last few days."
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